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Keramic Studio 



A MONTHLY MAGAZINE FOR THE CHINA PAINTER AND POTTER 

Index— Volume Nineteen 

MAY 1917 to APRIL 1918 INCLUSIVE 
KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO., SYRACUSE, N. Y. 
{All Rights Reserved) 

CONVENTIONAL 




MAY, 1917 Page 

Satsuma Tea Set Vernie Lockwood Williams 4 

Adaptations of the Color Supplement.. ..Adelaide Alsop-Robineau 5 

Scarab Designs Henrietta Barclay Paist 6 

Vase, Bird Design Dorothea Warren O'Hara 9 

Old Italian Jars Maud M. Mason 12 

Belleek Pitcher in Enamels Kathryn E. Cherry 13 

Sugar and Creamer, Butterfly Design.. Florence McCray 16 

Plate for Etching M. Janie Launt 17 

Forget-Me-Not Sugar Bowl and Plate.. ..Albert W. Heckman 22 

JUNE, 1917 
Design for Tea Tile or Book Ends, 

Enamels Kathryn E. Cherry 26-33 

Adaptations of the Color Supplement.. Adelaide Alsop Robineau 27 

Flower Pot, Bird Design Maud M. Mason 

Suggestions from Symbolic Motifs Vernie Lockwood Williams 30-31 

Conventional Motif, Grapes Henrietta Barclay Paist 32 

Old Chinese Crackle Vase Dorothea Warren O'Hara 37 

JULY, 1917 

Bowl ...Maud M. Mason 41 

Borders for Service Plates Vernie Lockwood Williams 52 

AUGUST, 1917 

Tiles for Window Box, Landscape Kathryn E. Cherry 61 

Tea Set, Marsh Marigold Motif Henrietta Barclay Paist 63 

Bird Design for Tile Maud M. Mason 66 

Bowl, Fish Motif Vernie Lockwood Wlliiams 68 

Shortcake Set, Strawberry Motif Albert W. Heckman 69 

Cup and Saucer, Simple Conventional 

Motif : Elise W. Tally 70 

Breakfast Set Lola St. John 71 

SEPTEMBER, 1917 



Vegetable Marrow Motifs Henrietta Barclay Paist 77 

Powder Box, Figure Motif Kathryn E. Cherry 79 

Floral Tile ' Maud M. Mason 80 

Tea Set, Japanese Motif Vernie Lockwood Williams 81 

Vase, Tea Set, Plates Vera Stone 85-90 

OCTOBER, 1917 

Tile for Book Ends, Landscape Henrietta Barclay Paist 93 

Sedji Ware, Motifs in Enamels Kathryn E. Cherry 94 

Fruit Dish, Design Adapted from 

Textile Vernie Lockwood Williams 95 

Border Designs for China or Glass J. O. Balda 99-101 

Plate Design Vera Stone 100 

Cup and Saucer Syvilla Fister 101 

Bowl Design, also suitable for Glass Mary L. Brigham 103 

NOVEMBER, 1917 
Construction Design, Butterfly Appli- 
cation Henrietta Barclay Paist 109 

Vase, Aztec Motif Esther A. Coster 110 

Cup and Saucer Allej'ne C. Webber Ill 

Belleek Bowl, Bird Motif Kathryn E. Cherry Ill 

Jardiniere Bird Motif Ada Maud Chapin 113 

Chop Plate abstract Design Vernie Lockwood Williams 114 



Page 

Cup and Saucer Elisc W. Tally 117 

Breakfast Set in Black and Red Albert W. Heckman 119 

DECEMBER, 1917 

Bowl and Plate, Butterfly Design Henrietta Barclay Paist 124-125 

Palm Jar and Tray, Camel Design Alice B. Sharrard 127 

Plant Analysis Vernie Lockwood Williams 129 

Plate J. O. Balda 130 

Cold Cream Box lone Wheeler 131 

Bowl Albert W. Heckman 131 

Plate Mary L. Brigham 132 

Plate Border and Honey Jar Elise W. Tally 133 

Box, Russian Motif Esther A. Coster 133 

Tea Set, Butterfly Annie S. Tardy 134 

Flower Vase Lola A. St. John 134 

Rose Vase Kathryn E. Cherry 135 

Bonbon Box F. H. Hanneman 136 

JANUARY, 1918 

Rectangular Vase, abstract flower form ..Vernie Lockwood Williams 139 

Vase, Bryonia Motif Henrietta Barclay Paist 140 

Satsuma Bowl Mrs. Richard Lavell 141 

Belleek Vase F. H. Hanneman 141 

Vase, Conventional Flower Kathryn E. Cherry 145 

Cold Cream Box Arthur L. Beverly 146 

Ramekin and Plate Marguerite Cameron :.. 148 

Plate or Cup and Saucer Designs Florence McCray 150 

Egyptian Bowl Albert W. Heckman 150 

Incense Jar and Cigarette Jar Albert W. Heckman 151 

Belleek Bowl M. N. Waterfield 151 

Satsuma Jardiniere Elise Tally Plall 152 

FEBRUARY, 1918 

Design Units J. K. Heismann 156 

Seven Borders Arthur L. Beverly 159 

Bird Design Unit Essie Foley 160 

Medallions for Vases, Creamers, etc Kathryn E. Cherry 161 

Little Things to Decorate Albert W.Heckman 162 

Designs for Glass Decoration M. A. Yeich 165 

MARCH, 1918 

Jardiniere Kathryn E. Cherry 171 

Plate with Berries Clara L. Connor 173 

Satsuma Vase, all over pattern, and 

Bowl Elise Tally Hall 174 

Suggestions from the Color Supplement. Adelaide A- Robineau 174 

Designs for Glass Decoration.: Lola A. St. John 176 

Fruit Bowl Leah Rodman Tubby 177 

Salad Bowl and Plate, Fish Design M. Louise Arnold 178 

Designs from the Wild Rose-Hip M. Janie Launt 181 

Marmalade Jar and Plate Florence McCray 182 

APRIL, 1918 

Tile Henrietta Barclay Paist 191 

Designs for Glass Work Flora Leland and Laurel G. 

Foster 192 

Vase, Spiderwort Motif Mrs. John Ehlers 194 

Child's Bread and Milk Set Hill Carter Lucas 198 



NATURALISTIC AND DECORATIVE 



MAY, 1917 Page 

Service Plate, Pink Roses May E. Reynolds 11 

Salad Bowl and Plate, Berries Walter K. Titze 15 

Decorative Motifs , Florence R. Weisskopf 18 

Oleander Vase Adeline Moore 19 

Little Things, Roses and Forget-Me- , 

N °ts Doris Dawn Mills 21 

JUNE, 1917 

Vase, Landscape Motif May„E .^Reynolds 35 



Bedroom Flower Vase, wild Asters Walter K. Titze 

Wild Flower Study '. Florence W. Whitson 

JULY, 1917 

Marsh Marigold Henrietta Barclay Paist.. 

Porch Set, Roses Walter K. Titze 

AUGUST, 1917 

Flower Medallions Adeline Moore 

Pansy Plate May E. Reynolds 



36 

38 



51 
53 



65 

72 



KERAMIC STUDIO-/«dcjk: 



NATURALISTIC AND DECORATIVE— Continued 



SEPTEMBER, 1917 Page 

Belleek Bowl, Violets Walter K. Titze 82 

Cup and Saucer, Chrysanthemums May E. Reynolds 83 

OCTOBER, 1917 

Candlestick, Roses May E. Reynolds Judson 104 

Four Plate Designs, Flowers Adeline More 105 

Vase, Japanese Figures Walter K. Titze 106 

NOVEMBER, 1917 

Luncheon Set, Roses Ida Nowells Cochran 116 

Grapes, Decorative Study Marion L. Fosdick 118 

Fish Plate Adeline More 120 

Cosmos Study Marion L. Fosdick 121 

DECEMBER, 1917 

Vase in Dogwood Leaves F. C. McGaughy 128 

Plant Analysis Florence W. Whitson 128 

Bird Vase May E. Reynolds Judson 135 



JANUARY, 191S Page 

Vase, Landscape Motifs May E. Reynolds Judson 146 

Four Decorative Panels Arthur L. Beverly 149 

FEBRUARY, 1918 

Plate, Berries Adeline More 158 

Chocolate Set May E. Reynolds Judson 166 

Lemon Lily Vase Albert W. Heckman 107 

Plant Analysis '....Florence W. Whitson 168 

MARCH, 191S 

Cup and Saucer, Flowers Adeline More 170 

Service Plate Mny B. Hoelscher 175 

Elderberry Blossom Vase Albert W. Heckman 179 

Snowberries Margaret Watkeys 183 

Plate, Border, Flowers F. H. Hanneman 184 

APRIL, 1918 
May E. Reynolds Judson 196 



Sugar and Creamer... 



MISCELLANEOUS 



MAY, 1917 



At the Sign of the Brush and Palette Anita Gray Chandler 2 

Duquesne Ceramic Club Exhibition 3-8 

The Linen Page Jetta Ehlers -. 10 

Beginner's Corner, Acid Etching Jesse M. Bard and Miriam Boone 14 

Some Don'ts Concerning Lustres Fanny Rowell 20 

JUNE, 1917 

At the Sign of the Brush and Palette Anita Gray Chandler 24 

New York Society of Keramic Arts 

Exhibition : 25 

The Linen Page Jetta Ehlers 34 

Beginner's Corner, Ice Tub Jessie M. Bard and Edith M .Hunt 38 

JULY, 1917 

Keramic Society of Greater New York 

Exhibition 39-50 

At the Sign of the Brush and Palette Anita Gray Chandler 40 

Madonna and Child, Delia Robbia 

ceramic Maud M. Mason „ 41 

AUGUST, 1917 

A. Plea for a National Flower (Colum- 
bine) • Allena Morgan Jones 57 

At the Sign of the Brush and Palette Anita Gray Chandler 58 

Newark Society of Keramic Arts Ex- 
hibition Sara McCampbell 59-6 

The Linen Page Jetta Ehlers 62 

Some Glass Shapes for Decoration 67 

Beginner's Corner, Cup and Saucer Jessie M. Bard and Elise Tally 70 

SEPTEMBER, 1917 

At the Sign of the Brush and Palette Anita Gray Chandler 76 

The Linen Page Jetta Ehlers 78 

Beginner's Corner, Plate Jessie M. Bard and Hallie Day 90 

OCTOBER, 1917 

Anita Gray Chandler 92 

Maud M. Mason 96-98 

Jessie M. Bard 100 



At the Sign of the Brush and Palette 

Fawcett School of Industrial Arts 

Beginner's Corner, Notes on Firing. 

The Linen Page Jetta Ehlers... 



102 



NOVEMBER, 1917 Page 

At the Sign of the Brush and Palette Aiiita Gray Chandler 108 

The Linen Page *... Jetta Ehlers 112 

Beginner's Corner, Tea Tile, Wild 

Asters Jessie M. Bard 115 

Glass Enamel Decoration Marie A. Frick 117 

DECEMBER, 1917 

Hand Decorated Beads Ida Diana Ekbergh 126 

Beginner's Corner, Child and Dinner 

Sets Jessie M. Bard, May B. Cheney 

and C.L. Chamberlain 130 

Glass Decoration D. M. Campana 132 

JANUARY, 1918 

Glass Decoration (continued) D. M. Campana 137 

Glass Designs, Tumbler and Glass Leah R. Tubby and Lola St. John.. 138 

Textile Designing Albert W. Heckman 112-144 

Beginner's Corner, Salt Shaker, Cup Jessie. M. Bard, F. M. Herring- 
ton, Orilla E. Miner, Ida Now- 
ells Cochran M7 

' FEBRUARY, 1918 

Wood Block Printing Albert W. Heckman 154-155 

Museum Study for Ceramic Students Maud M. Mason 157 

The Linen Page Jetta Ehlers 160 

Beginner's Corner, Dinner Set Jessie M. Bard, F. H. Hanneman 163 

Glass Decoration (continued) D. M. Campana 161 

MARCH, 1918 
The Making of a Design for Filet 

Crochet Lace Albert W. Heckman 

Glass Decoration (continued) D. M. Campana. 

Beginner's Corner, Plate Design .Jessie Al. Bard, and K. E. Cherry. 

APRIL, 191 S 

Chicago Ceramic Association Exhi- 
bition 186- 

Unity of Art, Work Bag and Table 

Runners Henrietta Barclay Paist 190- 

Gold Work on Glass D. M. Campana 

The Linen Page Jetta Ehlers 

Decorated Porcelains at Mineola Fair.Maud M. Mason 194- 

Beginner's Corner Jessie M. Bard, G. B. Spainhower 

and Mary L. Brigham 



172 
176 
1.80 



191 
192 
193 
195 



COLOR SUPPLEMENTS 



Treatment on page 

Mountain Ash Plate Kathryn E. Cherry May, 1917 

Vase, Conventional Rose Motif Kathryn E. Cherry June, 1917 

Lamp Vase, Bird Design Walter K. Titze July, 1917 

Fruit Plate and Butterfly Design May B. Hoelscher and Janie M. 

Launt August, 1917 

Conventional Flower Motifs Vera Stone September, 1917 

Snapdragon Study Lucy Marie Shover October, 1917 



Treatment on page 

Plate in Black and Red Albert W. Heckman, November, 1917 

Conventional Suggestion of Bitter 

Sweet Margaret II. Watkeys.. December, 1917 

Egyptian Vase in Green and Gold Albert W. Eeckman January, 1918 

Plate Design May B. Hoelscher February, 1918 

Chocolate Pot and Cup and Saucer Albert W. Heckman March, 1918 

Plate and Bowl in Orange, Red and 

Black Hill Carter Lucas April, HUN 



The entire contents of this Magazine are covered by the general copyright and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 

CONTENTS OF MAY, J9J7 



Editorial 

At the Sign of the Brush and Palette 

Duquesne Ceramic Club Exhibit 

Satstttna Tea Set 

Adaptations of the Color Supplement 

Scarab Motif 

Vase, Bird Cage Design, Satsuma or Belleek 

A Little Chat About Table Furnishings 

Service Plate, Pink Roses 

Old Italian Jars 

Answers to Correspondents 

Belleek Pitcher in Enamels or Dry Dusting Colors 

Marmalade Jar 

Beginners' Corner 

Salad Bowl and Plate 

Sugar and Creamer 

Plate for Etching 

Motifs for Various Uses 

Oleander Vase 

Some Don'ts Concerning Lustres 

Mouniain Ash Plate (Supplement) 

Talcum Shaker 

Bon Bon Dish, Sugar, Creamer, Open Salts, Cold Cream Box 

Forget-me-not Sugar Bowl and Plate 



Anita Gray Chandler 

Mrs. Vernie Lockwood Williams 
Adelaide Alsop Robineau 
Henrietta Barclay Paist 
Dorothea Warren O'Hara 
Jetta Ehlers 
May E. Reynolds 
Maud M. Mason 

Kathryn E. Cherry 
Miriam Boone 
Jessie M. Bard 
Walter K. Titse 
Florence McCray 
M. Janie Launt 
Florence R. Weisskopf 
Adeline More 
Fanny Rowell 
Kathryn E. Cherry 
May Whitbeck 
Doris Dawn Mills 
Albert W. Heckman 



Page 

1 
2 
3, 7, 8 
4 
5 
6 
9 
10 

n 

12 

12 

13 
14 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
20 
20 
21 
22 



REMITTANCES!!! 

We prefer Money-Order or New York Draft but if check 
is more convenient add the cost of Exchange which in N. Y. 
State is 10 cents.— KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO. 



ARE YOU LOOKING FOR "FAVORITE" CHINA ? 
If so, can you use any of the following items ? 



No 

China 

Catalogue 




Have you tried the Velvet paper 

used for all kinds of water-color 

work? Write me about it. 



LOAF SUGAK TKAY No. 3381 Price 50c 

ASK YOUR DEALER FOR "SYRACUSE" OUTLINING INK, 
25c and SOc Postpaid. 
WEBER'S SPHINX GOLD 65c a box, $7.20 dosen. 

SLEEPER'S CRUCIBLE GOLD " " 

Add two cents postage for each box. 
COOVER'S BLACK OUTLINES. CHINA PAINTERS' SUPPLIES. 

K.. E. CHERRY'S COLORS AND ENAMELS. 
JESSIE LOUISE CLAPP, 516 McCarthy Blk. f SYRACUSE, N. Y, 



THE CHERRY COLORS 

Colors for Painting and Tinting 
Special Colors for Dusting 

THE MOST POPULAR ENAMELS 
ON T HE MA RKET 

Send for Complete Price List 
The Robineau Pottery, Syracuse, N. Y. 



GLASS COLORS! 

Send for special list of 17 very fine imported glass colors; 
put up only in half vials : 
Mixing Yellow 9c. Gold Yellow 19c. Transparent Orange 16c. 

Yellow Brown 13c. Hair Brown 14c. Best Red 14c. 

Deep Carmine 20c. Rose Pink 17c. Violet Purple 40c, 

Deep Ruby. 56c. Light Green 15c. Celestial Blue 13c. 

Peacock Blue 13c. Dark Green 15c. Transparent Black. 13c. 

Outlining Black 10c. Soft Flux 13c. 

As an introductory offer, we will send these 17 colors, one 
half vial each, for $2.25 net (list price $3.10). 

ROMAN GOLD FOR GLASS $1.00 per box 

SILVER FOR GLASS 50c. per box 

The Robineau Pottery, Syracuse, N. Y. 



Vol. XIX, No. 1. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



May 1917 




SYRACUSE manufacturer of porce- 
lain tableware told us recently that 
his firm had more orders than they 
could fill at prices 30% higher than 
Jlast year. All Potteries, as a rule, 
^have so many contracts ahead that a 
jdealer in colors was able lately to 
|make with one firm a $12,000 con- 
tract of gold for decorating, and 
^with another a contract of $4,000. 

At the same time we have received the following letter 
from one of our contributors: 

"I am tired and completely disgusted with the commercial 
work. Just to give you an idea of the prices paid the worker: 
10c. a working for bread and butter plates, next size plates 
12|c, next size 15c. and so on. I know of this instance: a 
large French salad bowl, decorated in conventional basket 
motives, all done in hard enamels with much gold, representing 
a good deal of work carefully done, sold for $4.50. Think of it, 
how can any one make a living at such prices?" 

Quite a contrast between this manufacturer who cannot 
produce enough to fill orders and raises the prices of his wares 
to adjust them to new conditions, and the amateur decorator 
who has a hard time to sell her work at any old price dictated 
to her by somebody else. And the first lesson to draw from 
this is what we have so often repeated, that individual workers 
should shun commercial work. They cannot compete with 
factories in price and it would be a mistake to think that now- 
adays factories always do poor decorating work. Their stand- 
ard of design is improving rapidly. We have seen some 
extremely beautiful sets in conventional designs turned out by 
the Syracuse porcelain makers whom we mentioned before. 
If such work has not the individual touch of really artistic work, 
it is mechanically perfect and that is better than poor or 
mediocre individual painting. The only salvation for amateur 
decorators is to do better work than factory work, to do some- 
thing different. 

Another lesson is that factories have a good sales organi- 
zation; amateur decorators, still struggling with the old 
system of cut throat competition, are not organized. In the 
big cities, there are Clubs, it is true, which do a lot of good with 
their exhibitions, their classes of design, etc. They help won- 
derfully to improve the standard of decoration, but they are 
not really organizations to help decorators to sell, to fix the 
value of their work, not in competition with others but in ' 
co-operation with them. Such organizations seem to us very 
badly needed. 

Individual decorators have now to contend with the trying 
situation caused by the scarcity of white china. Some French 
china comes in all the time, but irregularly and in small quan- 
tities. There is of course no German china. Meanwhile the 
Japanese are sending good shipments of their wares, especially 
of Satsuma and Sedji, and we have reasons to believe that next 
fall there will be on the market some American earthenware 
specially made for the amateur trade and very satisfactoiy, 
but there will be no American hard china of the European type, 
as American potters will not change their process of lead glaze 
porcelain for the felspathic European porcelain. They get 
satisfactory results themselves with the overglaze decoration 



of lead glaze porcelain. If the trials made by decorators of this 
American china have failed, if the ware has come out of the kiln 
with black spots, it is simply because it was fired too fast. With 
the right kind of firing it will come out all right. 

But, whichever way the problem of scarce china is solved, 
either by using American china or by waiting until the trade 
conditions with Europe become normal again, it seems that 
there will be no scarcity of American, Italian or Japanese or- 
mental wares and of table earthenware. And in that line more 
than in any other there is a good opportunity to produce some- 
thing absolutely different from the regular factory porcelain 
tableware. 

However it is on the quality of work and design, and also 
on the processes of decoration that decorators should depend 
mostly for the production of really artistic work, different from 
the commercial work. With the ordinary painting and es- 
pecially with the strictly commercial trick of decalcomania, it 
requires exceptional executive ability to produce something 
better than factory ware. But with such processes as dusting, 
and especially with enamels, which are not practical for factory 
work, the possibilities for artistic, original work, are unlimited. 

And decorators should not depreciate their work by ac- 
cepting any low price which is offered to them. We do not 
mean that they should ask big prices for poor work, they must 
learn to do good work first. Then they will find that they can 
sell more easily at high prices than at low prices. People will 
not hesitate to pay good prices for really good craftswork. In 
fact they will often pass by something which is truly meritorious 
simply because it is priced low. They will figure that at such 
a low price it cannot be good. 

The Four Winds Club House, 210 Robineau Road, Syra- 
cuse, New York, will open a sales room for crafts work, May 1st 
in connection with a tea room. Those in charge wish to make 
a specialty of table furnishings, such as Porch, Breakfast and 
Lunch sets with linens to match, hand wrought silver, etc., etc. 
The Editor of Keramic Studio invites consignments of decorated 
porcelains from any one who wishes to take advantage of the 
opportunity of summer sales and will be personally responsible 
for payments of sales or return of unsold articles. It is re- 
quested that photographs of articles be submitted in order to 
avoid unnecessary expense, as only such as are accepted by the 
jury will be put on sale. 

The Club House is most attractively located and furnished 
and will be well advertised among the well to do. It appeals 
especially to auto parties and hunters after the unusual. It 
should be of some assistance to our Keramic workers in dis- 
posing of their work during the summer months when there is 
little doing in the cities. The Editor of Keramic Studio is 
personally much interested in the club's activities, especially 
the crafts shop and will do everything possible to encourage sales. 

The annual exhibition of the Newark Society of Keramic 
Arts will be held in the gallery of the Newark Free Public 
Library, April 24 to 28. The Library is easily accessible to 
out of town visitors and no cards of admission are required. 
It is hoped that many will take this opportunity to become 
acquainted with the work of the Society who have not done so 
previously. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



ANITA GRAY CHANDLER - - - Page Editor 

7 Edison Avenue. Tufts College, Mass. 



AT THE SIGN 

OF THE 
BRUSH AND PALETTE 




This is Ye Old Art Inn 
where the worker of Arts and 
Crafts may rest a bit and par- 
take of refreshment. 



THE modern ceramist and china decorator are really car- 
rying out the ideas and aspirations of a line of craftsmen 
who lived and wrought for many centuries before the dawn of 
Christianity. We wonder if the dignity and beauty of their 
own craft often occurs to them; if they realize the importance 
of the legacy that has been left them by the artistic efforts of 
the past ages? How often does our modern decorator visit the 
museum nearest her so she may see the examples of pottery and 
porcelain that have come down to us through the ages, and 
compare the styles of decoration that have been used? Or, in 
the absence of an art museum in her city, how often does she 
consult the numerous books that may be found in the public 
libraries dealing with ceramics, and so well illustrated with 
pictures of pottery and porcelain that it is almost as easy to 
study shape and designs as from the originals? 

To be sure, the modern decorator, or "china-painter," as 
she is inclined to call herself, is an unusually busy person. She 
is always working at top speed to keep the pot boiling, and if 
she includes firing among her accomplishments the time she 
calls her own might be packed into a thimble. But, of what 
avail is her work if quantity is the main consideration and her 
own ideas the chief inspiration? And how is the quality to be 
improved and her inspiration quickened if she fails to make 
some effort to learn what has preceded her own little phase of 




a very ancient art? She must connect with the past to be con" 
vincing in the present. Not that she must abjectly copy, but 
that she must gain a foundation upon which to build her own 
work. 

At first most of the pottery and porcelain will seem un- 
lovely to her. It may even seem crude and ugly to eyes that 
have become accustomed to what the writer chooses to call 
sentimentalism in decoration. Then after a while it will begin 
to fascinate; the very crudity will tell some story; the unfa- 
miliar decoration will pique the curiosity; a hundred questions 
will arise as to the maker, his country, the customs of his age, 
the purposes for which this particular jar or bowl was designed, 
its subsequent history, its influence upon later work. 

Suppose, for instance, one is looking at a case of Chinese 
pottery. Here are several little battered pieces of reddish clay 
lightly covered with green glaze. There is a slight incised de- 
sign upon some of them. They are the earliest specimens of 
glazed pottery ever made in China and date back to the second 
century B. C. Look a bit farther on. Here are some pieces 
made during the Han dynasty about the opening of the Christ- 
ian era. They also are green-glazed, but are more dextrously 
modeled, imitating the shapes of bronze vessels of that time. 




Iz'n-chow ware — Earliest overglaze Chinese decoration, an ancestor of our 
"4 modern porcelain — Sung dynasty. (Courtesy of the Boston Museum of 
£T Fine Arts.; 



Kang-hsi Vase — Yellow hawthorne. The reign of Kang-hsi brought about a 
brilliant artistic Renaissance, contemporaneous with the revival of art 
under Louis XIV in France. (Courtesy of the Boston Museum of Fine 
Arts.) 

It was not until the Sung dynasty that overglaze decora- 
tion came into use. Before this design had been either applied 
clay or incised. This Sung dynasty, which occupies a period 
of some 300 years near the close of the 10th century, marks the 
beginning of a real ceramic art. The designers broke away 
from the rules of the bronze makers and developed their own 
ideas in the clay. Mr. Bernard Rackham says in his book on 
porcelain: "It is strange to reflect how late in history their 
skill (the Chinese) has been learned, and to remember the Per- 
sians, Egyptians, Greeks and other western races were masters 
of the potters' craft many centuries before the Chinese achieved 
their earliest artistic wares. Coming late into the field, they 
evolved in a comparatively short space of time a material 
which placed them ahead of every rival." 




MAY 1917 
KERAMIC STU DIO 



MOUNTAIN ASH PLATE-KATHRYN E.CHERRY 

COPYRIGHT 1917 
KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



We in America have felt the artistic influence of China 
more and more each year. While we have been giving her 
Christianity she has given us art, or a certain conception of 
art that seems to have converted our designers much more 
easily than we have converted the "heathen Chinee." Step 
into an interior decorator's studio and you will find that the 
Chinese influence is featured quite as much as the Colonial 
(cherished child of the American decorator's heart). Look at 
the newest jewelry, embroidery, lamps, rugs, wall-coverings, 
draperies, pictures, furniture, even clothes, and what do you 
see? The Chinese influence, of course! Why are we using 
old blue and gold in our homes in place of the grays and pinks 
or the buffs and whites that formerly accompanied our Windsor 
chairs and pie-crust tables? The Chinese influence again. 

There is a wealth of inspiration for the china decorator in 
Chinese art. And what could be more appropriate than a Chi- 
nese motif or design upon a material which China discovered 
and which to this day bears her name? 

New York is to have a museum entirely devoted to the 
American Indian. It will house the George S. Heye collection 
of 400,000 specimens relative to the history of the North and 
South American Indians. It will be rich in pottery, weaving, 
bead embroidery, and carving. 



The Boston Society of Etchers has recently been organ- 
ized with thirty-two members, each seriously engaged in the 
work. Mr. George T. Plowman is the president. 

A Memorial exhibition of the paintings by the late John 
J. Enneking, Boston's well loved landscape painter, was so well 
attended that it was prolonged weekly. The painter's widow 
sat at the catalogue table at certain hours, and graciously an- 
swered questions about her husband's canvases. Beside the 
table hung his palette, just as he put it down, thickly covered 
with little hills and valleys of paint in every conceivable tint 
and shade. "I think he loved his chromatic studies best," 
said Mrs. Enneking in reply to my question, "Those were the 
last that he worked upon. He always loved the last best." 
And she indicated one of those misty, blue "symphonic poems" 
that intellectual Boston has raved over. At the banquet given 
the old painter not long ago at the Copley Plaza and attended 
by over 1000 of the artistic people of Boston, he was literally 
crowned with a laurel wreath. 




*3^-. 




EXHIBIT OF MRS. WILLIAMS 
DUQUESNE CERAMIC CLUB EXHIBIT, NOVEMBER, J9J6 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




MRS. VERNIE LOCKWOOD WILLIAMS - Page Editor 

University of Pittsburg. Home Studio, 52 W. Maiden St., Washington, Pa. 

SATSUMA TEA SET 

A N occult design to fill a circle made from a fine petaled 
-L*~ flower was adapted in three sizes for this Satsuma set. 
The largest medallion is for the center of a 9" plate, medium 
sized one for teapot, sugar, creamer and six inch cylindrical 
vase. The smallest is for cups and center of saucers. Mrs. 
Cherry's enamels were used with very successful results for 
this set. The dark part of design; quarter inch band on all 
pieces, handles and design on covers, is Azure Blue. The 
center of flower form is Jersey Cream. All other grey tones 
are Wistaria. Background of design, also narrow band on all 
pieces, is Aquamarine. The set is then soaked in tea to de- 
sired tone. The standard of the tea table was painted black, 
and trays Azure Blue to match blue on set. The ser- 
viettes and traycloth were oyster white. Italian linen, 
edged with cable stitch in Azure Blue floss. 

NOTE 

On page 199 of the April number, the two exhibition 
groups of china were attributed to Mrs. Vernie L. Williams. 
The lower one only was hers, the upper one was by her pupils. 



,•2*5 





KERAMIC STUDIO 




ADAPTATIONS OF THE COLOR SUPPLEMENT— ADELAIDE ALSOP ROBINEAU 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




MRS. HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST - Page Editor 

2298 Commonwealth Ave., St. Paul, Minn. 

THERE is no department of nature which furnishes more 
decorative material with more decorative possibilities 
than that which is classified as Entomology. From the stand- 
point of color and anatomy it furnishes endless themes for 
the designer. 

The Beetle (scarabaeus) is the subject of some of the oldest 
scuplture works of the Egyptians and forms the decorative 
unit which is so characteristic of Egyptian art and religion. 
The gadfly, our dragon fly, is another specimen with decorative 
possibilities both as to color and form and in terms of mineral 
pigment suggests enamels and lustres as materials for carrying 
out. This is one place where lustre seems to be the logical 
material for reproduction and yet when lustres held the center 
of the stage in interest and experiment these motifs were not 
given the prominence they would seem to warrant. In carry- 
ing out the units shown, gold bronze lustres and enamels may 
be used in combination or gold and lustres alone, gold being used 
on body and legs as an undercoat or body for lustre and the 
wings treated with lustre alone. If enamels are used, it will 
of course be in the bodies, the color schemes being left to 
the choice of the artist and the special needs or purpose to 
which the motif is adapted. The units shown can be woven 
into borders, tile designs or used simply as units well placed and 
held together by bands or lines. 






ART NOTES 

The third annual exhibition of the work of Northwestern 
artists under the auspices of the St. Paul Institute of Art was 
held in the auditorium March 3d to 14th inclusive. The 
awards were as follows: 
Oils: 

Gold medal, Emily Groom, Milwaukee, Wis. 
Silver medal, Magnus Norstad, St. Paul, Minn. 
Bronze Medal, Adrian Brewer, St. Paul, Minn. 
Honorable Mention, Gustaf Goetch, Minneapolis. 
Pastel and Water Color: 

Silver Medal, Francesco J. Spicuzza, Milwaukee. 
Bronze Medal, C. W. Lawford, Minneapolis. 
Honorable Mention, Blanch C. Grout, Lincoln, Neb. 
Etching: 

Honorable Mention, David T. Workman, Howard Lake, 
Minn. 

On March 7 the Twin City Keramic Club at a luncheon 
was addressed by Dean Oure of the University of Minnesota, 
on the subject of cloisonne. Dr. Oure gave a most delight- 
fully interesting talk, covering the history and the technique 
of the art under consideration and brought with him some 
rare specimens from his own collection, tools, materials, work 
in process, photographs, etc. He touched on the philosophy 
of the real Japanese artist in a most appreciative way and of 
one in particular who at the head of an art colony is trying to 
produce and perpetuate the best in this type of art. One can 
obtain data from encyclopedia but such an intimate and de- 
lightful treatment of a subject from one who is in position to 
speak with authority and from a deep love, is a rare treat, 
one which the club will long remember as an inspiration. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



The Club is also enjoying a six weeks course of evening- 
lectures by local artists on the following topics: "Art in Com- 
mon Things," "Mural decoration," "Taste," "How to judge a 
picture," Interior decoration" and a "Theory of color." 
♦ ♦ *> 

The John W. Alexander memorial collection which has 
been on view at the Minneapolis Art Institute during the 
month of March reminded art lovers afresh of the tremendous 
loss to the art world of this master of line, composition, color 
and lighting. His portrait of Walt Whitman, owned by the 
Metropolitan Museum, is a triumph of composition, of re- 
straint and refinement, luminous but harmonious in color, and 
sympathetic and appreciative as portraiture. 

The portrait of Joe Jefferson as "Bob Acres" is not so 
pleasing pictorially, but is a masterful portrayal of character. 
His exquisite studies of women, rhythmic in line, broad and 
decorative in treatment, strongly suggest what is best in Japa- 
nese art, but the atmosphere is wholly American. Mr. Alex- 
ander's pictures affect one like a breath of fresh air. They 
have the sweep of the sea, the compelling curves of the wind, 
the atmosphere of sincerity and the joy of life 

On exhibition at the same time was the collection of 27 
wood carvings by Chas. Hoag, a Scandinavian, together with 
some interesting textiles by his wife. The carvings represented 
"The Spirits of the Woods," and are inspirational in concep- 
tion and splendid in technique. Some of them are veritable 
poems in wood. They are carved from the woods best suited 
to the theme, and the titles are suggestive of the mysterious 
quality of the carvings. "The Holy Spirit," "Mystery of 
Nature," "Struggle of Nature," "Dying Chestnut," "Evolu- 
tion," " The Oak's Song," etc., are a few of the themes which 
have inspired this artist craftsman. One of the weavings by 
his wife shows a shadow portrait of himself in grey wools. 

A group of flower panels in pastel by Agnes Harrison Lin- 
coln were a part of the March attractions. They were repre- 
sentative of the latest thought and feeling in color and compo- 
sition. As color schemes they were virile, but as compositions 
they show strongly the modern tendency to crowd and con- 
fuse. They were strenuous and compelling, but as the stren- 
uous life is .not always the most efficient, the picture which bids 




MRS. PRICE— DUQUESNE CERAMIC CLUB EXHIBIT, NOV., 1916 



loudest for recognition is not the one to give the most lasting 
pleasure or hold the interest it has gained. 

Through the Scandinavian Art Society of America the 
Minneapolis Institute has become possessed of two represent- 
ative paintings of the Scandinavian Exhibit which has been 
making its rounds of American cities since the close of the 
Panama Pacific Exposition. 




MRS. MCINTYRE— DUQUESNE CERAMIC CLUB EXHIBIT, NOVEMBER, 1916 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




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DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 

132 East 19th Street, New York City 



KERAMIC STUDIO 

Page Editor 



VASE, BIRD CAGE DESIGN, SATSUMA OR BELLEEK 

FIRST FIRE— Paint the entire vase with equal parts of 
Yellow luster and Orange luster, using a large square 
shader and plenty of garden lavender oil. 

Second fire — Divide the vase in four sections. (There are 
four bird cages on the vase). The design is carried out in 
Brown Enamel soft, except the bird and the little dark spots 
in the cage, these are made of Emerald Green Enamel hard. 
As the hard enamel requires a very much harder fire to de- 
velop it than the soft Brown Enamel, the Emerald Green En- 
amel should be floated on as thinly as possible. When applied 
in this way it will develop along with the Brown, which is 
floated on heavier. The reason for using the hard enamel in 
connection with the soft, is to produce a different texture for the 
bird and little green spots, which in this particular instance is 
desirable. A very similar effect, however, is obtained by using 
Bright Sea Green Enamel soft, for the bird and spots, and 
would perhaps be easier. 



Jt<^Ofr?CK50^CK 





Fall size panel 



10 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




THE LINEN PAGE. 

JETTA EHLERS ------ p AGE Editor 

18 East Kinney Street, Newark, N. J. 

A LITTLE CHAT ABOUT TABLE FURNISHINGS 

ANOTHER example of the use of figured linens is shown 
in this month's illustration. This is part of a set made 
of an exquisite Russian hand-woven linen. This it is impossi- 
ble to procure now on account of the war, but it is shown be- 
cause it is so full of suggestion. The edge is a simple filet 
border of very fine oyster white French linen thread. 

The whole set is most unusual, and will I am sure be an 
inspiration to some workers. It is through the courtesy of 
Marshal Fry, whose property it is, that I am able to show it. 
While it may be impossible to get linen just like this, I feel 
sure that there are things of the same order to be had which 
would work up beautifully. Of course, where a material is 
so beautiful in itself, it needs very little if any decoration. 
The little filet edge on this Russian set so repeats the lace like 
weave of the linen, that it seems a perfect finish. The set 
consists of runner, table mats, and napkins. There is a linen 
which has a tiny all-over design woven in that would make up 
well. This comes in the cream white only, but could be used 
with color either in applique or crochet. An interesting set 
was worked out for the servants quarters of a country house, 
combining heavy unbleached muslin and blue and white 
checked gingham. The checks were about a half inch square. 
This was applied in bands upon the cloth and napkins, in 
much the same manner as the blue and white set shown in 
the January number. Blue willow ware was used with this. 
Sash curtains of cream voile with bands of gingham made the 
curtains for the dining room, the whole effect being most 
cheery and attractive So you see very ordinary material 
may serve to bring about successful results. To consider 
the arrangement of a table as a problem in design, may come 
as a new thought to some workers. If ever one had an op- 
portunity to demonstrate in a practical way good space divi- 
sion, this is it. There was a day when hospitality was weighed 
by the enormous quantity and variety of food spread before 
the guest. "The table groaned," is a time honored expres- 
sion. No worthy old fashioned company supper, set forth 
less ' than four or five kinds of cake, and as many sorts of 
preserves and pickles. One had indigestion before the meal 
even began. Now we choose rather to have a smaller but 
still abundant menu, finely cooked and exquisitely served. 
The table no longer groans, but is ever and ever growing more 
a thing of beauty, where the interior decorator may exercise 



all the finest things of his art. 

The point of interest in arranging the table seems naturally 
to be the center piece. This may be beautifully arranged flowers 
in bowl, vase or basket. Or it may be a basket of fruit, or a 
metal comport with fruit. Whatever it is, let it be some- 
thing choice in both form and color. There is a great fancy 
for the artificial fruits just at present for this decoration, and 
one may find in certain shops in New York the most exquisite 
things in this line. They are, sad to say, exceedingly expen- 
sive and therefore out of the reach of most of us. There are 
beautiful clusters of grapes, both the dark purple-black and 
the greenish white, that look as though they would melt in 
one's mouth, which they wont, being made of glass. They 
cost the neat little sum of three dollars a rather small cluster. 
A beautiful luscious looking pear cost three fifty. There are, 
however, some things which may be picked up at a much 
lower figure. A friend told recently of discovering back on 
the top shelf of a little used closet, an old fashioned mound of 
wax fruits under a glass shade. Some of the things were 
really very good, and were soon making a fine bit of color in a 
brass comport on a fine old mahogany sideboard. And a bit 
of good color is what we most want in this arrangement of the 
center, whether it be flowers or fruit. Poking' about through 
the shops the other day on the lookout for new things some 
candles were discovered which made a strong appeal. These 
were made of beeswax, and were lovely in color, a sort of grey- 
ish yellow brown. In pewter candlesticks these would be a 
joy. One could build up a whole table scheme from them. 
They are twenty-five cents a pair. Candles for the table are 
largely used without shades. There is a simple dignity about 
them used in this fashion which seems to fit in better with 
some of the things we are trying to do. Another sort which is 
much used is the church or altar candle. These have a yellow 
tone which goes nicely with the colored linens. They are 
bought by the pound. The green bay berry candles are also 
used and look well with brass or copper candlesticks. Of 
course with the very simple linens and china we are planning, 
only candlesticks of simple line and color will harmonize. Do 
not choose elaborate or highly decorated ones for use with 
these things. They don't "belong". In planning your table 
aim to have a symetrical arrangement. Avoid crowding things, 
and remember that simplicity, in this as in the linens, is the 
keynote of good taste. Because it is simple, it need not lack 
in elegance and distinction. Do not place things about the 
centerpiece in a hap-hazzard fashion, but place them care- 
fully, with the thought of good space division uppermost. 

Keep experimenting as you go along, and do not be afraid, 
to try some daring things. Rather something decidedly ex- 
treme once in a while than to stagnate. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



U 





MAY E. REYNOLDS ------ Page Editor 

116 Auditorium Building, Chicago, 111. 



SERVICE PLATE, PINK ROSES 

t^IRST Fire— Outline design in Outlining Ink, and dust on 
A band,with Olive Green, paint in roses with Rose, Ameri- 
can Beauty, and a touch of Crimson Purple, leaves in Yellow 



Green, Moss Green, Brown Green, a touch of Grass Green, 
Veins in Dark Green and Finishing Brown, Violet Trenton 
Ivory, Neutral Yellow, pale wash of Violet, in shadows, also 
Violet of Iron in shadow parts. Lay in Roman Gold in the 
band design, and Green Gold in the conventional leaf design. 

Second Fire — Retouch roses in light wash of Peach Blos- 
som and American Beauty in centers. Retouch gold in design 
and in band. 



12 

MAUD M. MASON - 

218 East 59th Street, New York City 



KERAMIC STUDIO 

Page Editor 



FOR OUR INSPIRATION 

FOR our inspiration this month, we have two fine old Italian 
apothecary jars. These jars date about the fourteenth 
or fifteenth century and were used as receptacles for the medi- 
cines of ancient time and are always most interesting in form 
and decoration. In the larger jar the distribution of the 
ornament and the spacing of the bands are especially worthy 
of study. In the vertical decoration we have a leading motif 
alternating with a subordinate one, this giving an interesting 
rhythmic repetition of vertical bands, the whole decoration 
strengthening rather than weakening the form. 

These jars are covered with a grey white opaque glaze and 
the decoration is something in polychrome, rich blues, greens 
and yellows and again in blues and many very beautiful ones 
are decorated in lustre. They are much sought after to-day 
by collectors and the prices of fine examples run into the 
hundreds. 

Those who have been experimenting with some of the 
coarser wares will find the treatment of the small jar especially 
suggestive. In my class in the Fawcett Industrial School in 
Newark, some of the pupils have had very interesting re- 
sults with enamels on some dull yellow bowls for which they 
paid ten cents. 





Jar of Enameled Earthenware painted in Dark Blue and Manganese 
Purple — Italian, first half of 15th Century. 



Old Italian Jar of Enameled Earthenware 
K* IT 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

A subscriber answers B. J.'s inquiry in the February magazine which 
was as follows : 

/ have painted on a variety of materials but I met my Waterloo in dealing 
■with parchment. It wrinkles and crinkles in spile of all efforts. What will 
prevent this? What, varnish is used and is varnish ever applied before applying 
colors? What black is used as a background? 

I think the trouble is too wet paint, try wiping your brush quite dry ami 
flat before taking up the color, then take a little at a time on the flat of the 
brush and work on the surface of the parchment. Water colors will not ad- 
here to varnish. Ivory Black is a good Black. 

F. J . C. — I have a quantity of gold and silver leaf in little paper bunks such 
as used by sign painters and gold letters on glass. Is there any way 1 ran US< 
it on cliiua.' 

2. Have a bonbonniere dusted in 1 grey green, 1 dark green, \ brawn 
green, jorgot to pad the oil smooth and it came out cloudy. Can I do anything 
to cover the cloudy part? It is also loo green. 

8. How shall I slack a 13 in. punch bowl, shall I fire it alone? 

4. Can you assist me to find a color study showing desert, pyramids una 
sphinx with camels, caravan, etc., in moonlight. 

1. Unless you had a very large amount it would not pay you to bother 
with it for a sheet contains very little of the metal and it would have to be 
dissolved in acid and go through quite a little process. 

2. The only thing would be to oil it again and dust if but this would 
make it still darker. You might try dusting it with 1 part Dark Grey for 
Flesh and 1 part Pearl Grey. This may soften the green. 

3. Stand the bowl on edge with the base against the side of the kiln 
and put some supports under the base .to keep it in place. It need not be 
fired alone. Fire slowly. 

4. We do not know of any study that would have all the things in you 
mention. 

(Continued on page 21) 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



13 




BELLEEK_PITCHER IN ENAMELS OR DRY DUSTING COLORS— KATHRYN E. CHERRY 



KATHRYN E. CHERRY - 

Marina Building, St. Louis, Mo. 



Page Editor 



BELLEEK PITCHER 

In Enamels— The lines are No. 5, Azure Blue; grey on 
flowers No. 2, Aquamarine; leaves No. 3, Leaf Green; dark 



on flower No. 4, Chinese Blue; Background No. 4, Chinese 
Blue; medallion No. 1, Silver Grey. 

Dry Dusting — Outline design in India Ink. Oil and 
dust the lines with No. 5, Dark Blue for Dusting. Oil the 
leaves, dust with No. 3, Florentine Green. Oil grey in flowers, 
dust with Grey Blue. Oil medallion, dust with Pearl Grey. 
Second Fire — Oil background, dust with Dove Grey, retouch 
any of the design where color is weak. 



14 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




MARMALADE JAR— MIRIAM BOONE 



BEGINNERS' CORNER 

JESSIE M. BARD ------ Page Editor 

Dickinson Seminary, Williamsport, Pa. 

ACID ETCHING 

Treating Design of Marmalade Jar by Miriam Boone 

ONLY white china can be used for acid etching. Divide 
the jar in three equal parts and trace the design on and 
outline with India ink according to previous instructions. 
The bands can be drawn in with either a Keramic gauge or 
with the use of a banding wheel. All parts of the design that 
is not to be lowered or etched must be covered with a resist 
for the acid. Turpentine Asphaltum is used for this purpose 
and can be bought at a hardware store or where painters' sup- 
plies are sold. 

This work is not hard if the pupil will exercise a little 
care and judgment in working but some people make great 
labor of it. The Asphaltum becomes gummy in a short time 
so it is best to take out just a little with the end of a palette 
knife, about a teaspoonful. Use a china slant to work it up 
in or a small saucer would answer. A great many people get 
it on the handle of the palette knife and of the brush and on 
their hands and thus get everything sticky, making hard work 
of it and themselves uncomfortable, but this is not necessary. 
Keep the asphaltum about the consistency of enamels so it 
flows easily from the brush, thin it with turpentine when it 
becomes too stiff. Use a No. 1 or 2 Winsor and Newton red 



sable brush. Keep the asphaltum on the tip of the brush 
only and flow it on just as enamels are flowed out. It should 
be applied heavy or the acid will eat through it. Light brown 
places are thin places and are to be avoided. Work for straight 
edges as ragged edges spoil the effect of the design. Cover all 
of the design and the bands with the asphaltum, leaving the 
background white, then cover the remaining surface of the 
jar leaving a white space about a sixteenth of an inch all 
around the design and bands. Every thing must be covered 
that is not to be etched, for the fumes of the acid will dull the 
glaze. The acid can be applied as soon as the asphaltum is 
dry. The acid used is Hydrofluoric. This is one of the strong- 
est acids made and great care should be taken in the use of it. 
Have a bottle of ammonia convenient to use in case you get 
any on you. If one is inclined to be careless one had better 
not use the acid, though there is no danger if one will take 
ordinary precautions. Take a brush handle or a small stick 
and wrap a small piece of cotton tightly on the end of it, 
make a swab, dip this in the acid and then apply it to the white 
parts of the china left exposed, this is done with a rolling motion 
of the stick, if it is rubbed on the asphaltum will be rubbed off. 
Make another application when the china looks dry; it usually 
takes about an hour to absorb it. Length of time to etch 
depends on the hardness of the china, it usually takes about 
six or more applications of the acid. The depth can be tested 
by taking a pen knife and scraping along one of the edges. 

When it is dry enough hold the article under running- 
water to remove the acid then place it in boiling water until 
the asphaltum becomes soft enough so it can be scraped off 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



with a knife. After scraping clean it with turpentine. Rub 
a little charcoal over the etched surface to bring out the design, 
rub all the surplus charcoal off with the hand or a soft cloth 
leaving a grey background which will not affect the gold. 
Paint the petals of the flowers with either Yellow Lustre or 
with Albert Yellow and a pinch of Dark Grey paint. Centers 
of flowers are painted with Yellow Brown and a little Yellow 
Red. Go over all the rough etched part, stems, leaves and 
bands with Green Gold. The light part of jar is tinted with 
a light creamy tone made of Albert Yellow and a little Dark 
Grey. The dark bands are 5 parts Dark Grey and 1 part 
Yellow Brown. Go over Gold for second fire. 




PANEL OF PITCHER (Page 13) 
KATHRYN E. CHERRY 

SHOP NOTE 

The E. Westphal Art Company of 521-527 West 7th St., 
Los Angeles, Cal., have engaged Miss Mabel Sponholz from 
their Milwaukee Store, to teach the use of enamels in their 
studio for three weeks, beginning April 16. 



WALTER K. TITZE - - - 

210 Fuller Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. 
Inside Border of Bowl 



15 

Page Editor 




Ornament to be used on Plate 

SALAD BOWL AND PLATE 

ALL dark bands and basket motives are Green Gold. Light 
Colored leaf in Roman Gold, the same with conven- 
tional berries. Dark Grey in back of conventional motive 
3 parts Mode, 1 part Pearl Grey. Light grey 1 part Mode 
and 3 parts Pearl Grey. Lower part of bowl is dusted with 2 
parts Ivory Glaze, 1 part Mode and 1 part Pearl Grey. 
If enamel and no gold is desired (use Belleek), all dark bands, 
basket motives, outline of berries in Azure Blue (Cherry's) or 
Chinese Blue (O'Hara's). Leaves (dark) 2 parts Florentine 
Green and 1 part Azure Blue. Light leaf Florentine Green. 
Inside of berries Turquoise. Dark grey in back of motive 1 
part Azure Blue, 2 parts Special White and 1 part Florentine 
Green. Light grey 1 part Turquoise, 1 part Florentine Green, 
1 part Special White. This may be outlined if desired. Work 
naturalistic in lightly, remembering the conventional must be 
most prominent. Use a lot of greys in leaves, violet in back- 
ground and do not make berries too blue. Circle motive to be 
used in center of plates with a small band at the edge. Inside 
border to be used three times. 




16 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




SUGAR AND CREAMER— FLORENCE McCRAY 



T INES on handles, bands and background of butterfly 
-L* Antique Green Bronze. Semi-circle and two lines be- 
low butterfly Green Gold. Butterfly three shades of Green 
Enamel. Flowers and spots on wings Dull Blue Enamel. 
Tint band with Grey Green. Tint the rest of the piece Ivory 
to which a little green has been added. 

EXHIBITION NOTE 

The Philadelphia Ceramic League will hold its Eleventh 
Annual Exhibition at the Plastic Club, 247 S. Camae St., 
May 11 and 12, 10 a. m. to 6 p. m.; May 13 2 to 5 p. m.; May 
14 10 a. m. to 6 p. m. This is expected to be the largest and 
most interesting display ever given, as the League has added 
more than thirty new members in the past year and will award 
at this Exhibition 16 gold pieces as prizes. 

M. E. OAKES, 
Chairman Exhibition Committee. 




FULL SIZE ORNAMENT 




PLATE FOR ETCHING— M. JANIE LAUNT 



(Treatment page 17) 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



17 




PLATE FOR ETCHING— M. JANIE LAUNT 

Leaves and stems, Green Gold ; background, also Green Gold ; panels, tints, either Pink, Green or 
Yellow Luster or two lusters may be used. 



18 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



MOTIFS FOR VARIOUS USES 

Florence R. Weisskopj 
These motifs are taken from the dahlia studies. 
No. 1. Flower petals, yellow enamel; outlines, grey; 
small petals and buds, orange enamel with black center. The 
leaves and stems are dark grey enamels. 

No. 2. Small bud motif. Gold outline and stems; bud, 
Chinese blue paneled in, and dark part of leaves blue green. 




No. 3. Small circular motif. Outline, stems and leaves, 
black enamel; background, ivory tint; round flower, white en- 
amel; dark circular petal, bright red; small center, pale green. 

No. 4. Rectangular form. — Flower petals, orange luster 
outlined in dark brown.; stems and leaves, brown; downward 
pointed form, pale green lustre. 

Triangular form. — Flower petals, blue with darker blue 

surrounding; dark part black and center gold. Leaves, gold 

outline and veining on grey ground; 

■ lines gold. 
Flower form. — Leaves, stem, outline 
and dark part of petal dark purple 
enamel; light part crimson and down- 
ward painting form, medium grey. 

Motif with three flowers. — All lines 
and dark part of design, silver; flowers 
to be filled with several shades of bright 
blue enamel. 

Large oval motif. — Tint background 
grey ; stems and leaves dark grey enamel ; 
outline of flower forms, dark grey 
paint. Fill in flowers, alternating orange 
enamel petals and yellow painted ones; 
center of flower and buds, bright blue 
enamel. 

Round medallion. — Large round 
flower, lavender and purple, with yellow 
center; leaves and outline, black; other 
flower forms, orange and brown; round 
forms, medium blue enamel dots. 

Other forms are so simple that no de- 
scription is given. 




KERAMIC STUDIO 



19 




Bi 



PAINT _ dark leaves with 
Copenhagen blue and 
one-third of Yellow Green, 
the light leaves are Apple 
Green, the very dark touches 
are Shading Green with the 
Yellow Green. Stems are 
Mauve and Shading Green. 
The flowers are painted with 
Yellow for Painting very 
delicately and shaded with 
Pink and Mauve. Buds are 
shaded with Pink and Mauve 
Buds are a brighter pink. 

Second Fire — Oil the vase 
with dusting medium very 
dry, pad until no oil shows 
on pad then clear design with 
cotton on an orange stick 
then dust the vase with 3 
parts Dove Grey and 2 parts 
of Ivory Glaze. Touch cen- 
ters in flowers with a thin 
wash of Yellow for Painting 
and the edges with Pink. 

Third Fire — Go over the 
leaves and flowers in deepest 
places same colors used in 
first fire then wash shadows 
back of design with Dark 
Grey for Flesh. 






OLEANDER VASE— ADELINE MOORE 
Three repeats on vase 



20 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



SOME DON'TS CONCERNING LUSTRES 

Fanny Rowell 
TF we tell you the many things not to do with lustres we hope 
-■- we may help you secure dainty coloring simply and directly 
with this fascinating medium They should be used firmly. 
Do not touch and retouch. Decide what you want to do, 
quickly and firmly place the color, then leave it alone. Stu- 
dents make too hard work of it. Because it is done so quickly, 
if done well, they think it cannot be finished. I have seen 
them patch over and over, with each new stroke a fresh disaster. 
"But I can take it all off," one answered when I commented in 
this way on her manner of working. 

Bear in mind that the smallest daub of lustre leaves its 
color. In washing a tint off to try again, be sure that you get 
it all off. It is an untidy procedure for lustre, to put on and 
take off. It is usually in combination with colors or outline 
that we use lustres, and we may deface some other part of 
the work. If spaces are to be laid in solid tints, use a flat 
brush well filled with lustre, but with the lustre pressed out of 
the brush against the bottle, so there may be abundance to 
work with but no drops of lustre. You can manage then to 
paint an even tint without padding. If a lighter tint is de- 
sired, pad as soon as the tint is laid on the china and pad until 
it ceases to be tacky. It is just wet enough to catch all the 
dust that is in the atmosphere. Dry it in a ventilated oven 
at once. Dust is the natural enemy of lustres. If you should 
lay the china away, half dry, to await for a firing, you can 
easily see how it would absorb particles of dust as so much 
mucilage would. It is fun to lay it on, but not half so much 
fun when it comes from the firing with blemishes, so beware 
that you use the lustres neatly and quickly. 

Ornament over lustre if it is in the plan of your work. 
Too much of the ornament over lustres tells a sad tale of being 
put to cover blemishes. It is not worth while to do a lot of 
unnecessary decorating to cover shabby work. Have a hospi- 
tal for the pieces of china thus spoiled or a bottomless pit in 
the cellar or a bottle of hydrofluoric. If your time is of value, 
better not waste it with spotted lustres. It is so easy to use 
lustres right and not have blemishes. 

A kiln near at hand is a necessity, and the less handling 
the better. The ideal firing is to have it in the same room where 
the lustres are painted, and they may be dried in the kiln 
with the door open. The steam from the lustres must escape. 
You can readily understand- that if the rising vapor has to 
return and rest on the china, something will happen to the 
lustre, usually spots, varying from pin point size to the size 
of a gold piece. Then what are you going to do? No use to 
put a tint over because where the vacancies occur the new tint 
will show lighter. When brushes are clean and dry, they are 
are all right for lustre. Never mind if paint or gold has been 
in them before, so that they are clean, we use any brushes 
that in size may suit our work. Broad flat sable brushes such 
as are used in oil painting are useful in laying large spaces in 
lustre. Do not leave the lustres to dry in them or they will 
be hard as rocks, and of no use. To use a brush with some 
paint in it surely dulls the lustre. If you want this effect, 
now you know how to get it. But usually you do not want it. 
You can see after firing where color gets used out of a brush 
and pure lustre begins. If such a mistake should occur in 
putting a tint around the edge of a plate, the place where the 
tint joins shows distinctly different colors. All this is very 
aggravating, but thus do you learn. If one is not thoughtful 
it might be best to leave lustres alone. 

Then on the painting table, with the open bottles of lus- 
tre around, do you dip here and there and forget which colors 
you have used and make a general mix up of tints from which 



only second sight could rescue you? And put the corks back 
where they belong? A cork wet with dark green would not 
improve the tint of a rose lustre and a few drops of ruby would 
certainly spoil a bottle of opal. 

"What is the matter with these lustres?" a stranger asked 
who brought to my studio as uninviting a mess of lustres as 
it has ever been my fate to see. 

5 "What is the matter with you?" I felt inclined to say for 
never had lustres been more ill-treated. They were deep in 
color without brilliancy, fingered and spotted before firing, 
ill-suited to the shapes on which they were placed, inartistic 
in arrangement and with no effective contrasts. She thought 
it might be the fault of the firing. The real fault was in untidy 
handling, with intent to remedy with more lustre if it should 
not come out right. This daintiest of keramic materials needs 
bright thought and deft hands or the tones lose their freshness. 
One fault was that she had the habit of using the colors too 
heavily. A thin wash is always best, even if the darkest of 
rich tones is desired, get it by repeated washes, with a firing 
for each. For a single firing or any work that is not complicated, 
opal lustre gives the most charming effects. It is quite lovely 
in its irregularity, for truly opal tints develop the shell colors 
that we like in Mother of Pearl. 

MOUNTAIN ASH PLATE (Supplement) 

Kaihryn E. Cherry 

SKETCH design in then paint red berries with Blood Red 
and Ruby, the lighter ones are Blood Red, then the 
brighter ones are Yellow Red; the yellow ones are Yellow for 
Painting and Yellow Brown. The accents on berries are 
Auburn Brown. Leaves are painted in with Shading Green 
and Yellow Green. The stems are Brown Green and Blood Red. 
Background is Yellow, Blood Red, Yellow Brown and Mauve. 
Second Fire — Paint the dark leaves around design with 
Auburn Brown and Brown Green and a little Yellow Brown. 
Touch berries by washing over the shadow side with Blood Red 
and Yellow; on light side accent the leaves with Shading Green 
and Brown Green, then put shadows on background with Blood 
Red and Mauve. j** t<* 

TALCUM SHAKER 
May Whitbeck 

OUTLINE with Black. 
Paint large center 
flower and the two at the 
bottom of shaker with 
Yellow Brown and a little 
Dark Grey, all other flow- 
ers have a thin wash of 
Albert Yellow. Centers 
of flowers are Yellow 
Brown and a little Yellow 
Red. Leaves are Apple 
Green and a little Yellow 
Green. The space be- 
tween the two lower band 
lines is of the green, leav- 
ing one single black line. 
Paint the space at the bot- 
tom of the shaker and be- 
tween two lines around the 
neck with Dark Grey and 
a little Yellow Brown and 
the space above the main 
design with Albert Yellow 
and a little Dark Grey. 




KERAMIC STUDIO 



21 



LITTLE THINGS 

Doris Dawn Mills 

BON BON DISH 

PAINT forget-me-nots 
with Deep Blue Green 
and a little Violet No. 2 
in the shadows. Leaves 
are Albert Yellow, Apple 
Green, Brown Green and 
Shading Green. Shadow 
leaves are Blood Red and 
Deep Blue Green. Tint 
Deep Blue Green at bot- 
tom blending it into Al- 
bert Yellow (very light) 
at top. Bars, balls and 
edge Gold. 

SUGAR AND CREAMER 
AND OPEN SALTS 

Light band at top Rus- 
sian Green. Bands Gold. 
For roses use Rose. For 
leaves Albert Yellow, Ap- 
ple Green, Brown Green 
and Shading Green. For 
shadows Blood Red and 
Deep Blue Green. 

For second salt, dark 
at top and balls are Gold. 
Lower part of both a very 
light cream. 

COLD CREAM BOX 

Use Rose for flowers. 
For centers, Albert Yellow 
with Yellow Brown and 
Brown for dark. For the 
leaves use Albert Yellow, 
Apple Green, Brown Green 
and Shading Green. For 
the stems Brown Green. 
Shadows, Blood Red and 
Deep Blue Green. Tint 
center a very light Yellow. 
Edge and bottom of box 
Blood Red padded to a 
delicate Pink. 









ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 
(Continued from page 12) 

E. L. S. — Please tell me what colors to use for design on vase in June, 
magazine, page 26 by Mrs. Chas. Warner. Flat or Enamel colors? 

2. When Fat Oil is mentioned, does that mean Fat Oil of Turpentine? 

3. Is there anything in powder or paste form which can be mixed with 
color to make soft enamels? 

4. Would Mason's "Best White Enamel" mixed with color make a soft 



or hard enamel.' 

1. Either flat or enamel colors could be used. 

2. Yes, they are the same thing. 

3. See answer to B. E. T. in March, 1917, for formulas. 

4. Any enamel can be used, but some are harder than others and need 
more enamel or flux in proportion to the color used. It is best to make a 
test and fire it first or write to the manufacturer as we are not familiar with 
the different makes. 



22 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



M . L. C. — In enamel work on Satsuma and Belleck what colors muni I 
use with while enamel to gel a coral shade? 

2. What colors mixed with while will (jive the inside, outside and seeds of a 



3. Will Yellow Brown and Carnation give the color of an orange? 
4- In soft enamel designs are the backgrounds tinted? 
■5. Is Opal or Yellow Lustre a good foundation for gold on Belleekf 
6. Will Belleek or Satsuma stand four or five fires? 

1. Try Pink and a little Carnation. 

2. For outside use Yellow Brown, a little Yellow Red and a touch of 
Black, for inside put the white on fine and when dry paint over it lightly 
with Ruby and Blood Red; for seed apply the white and paint with Ruby 
and a little Black. 

3. Yes. 

4. It depends on the design, a tint may be used if desired. 

5. Yes, if you mean they are to be used for a background. 

6. Yes. 



Airs. ] 



-I have a piece of china from which the lustre has been removed 



with acid and relinled with Peach Blossom and Mauve in different parts of the 
elesign. The color has small black specks through the tint. Can you suggest 
any wan to relinl or cover these flaws and not lose the design? 

It is impossible to answer this question without seeing the design and 
the coloring. A darker tint could be used if it would not spoil the effect of 
the design. 

Mrs. I. — / would like to ask about a piece of china I saw which had a 
ground of an Ivory tint but instead of a glaze it was dull, looked like lint padded 
and dry before firing. I do malt work but this looked different, very fine and soft, 
like velvet. Can you tell me how it was done? 

Some people apply acid to the china, just enough to dull the glaze and 
then paint over it and this has a matt effect, possibly that is what you refer to. 

./. P. II. — How can I mend a doll's head of wax and what colors will it 
lake when mended? Are there any wax colors I can gel? 
What can I thin lustre with when it is too thick? 

1. We do not know, apply to a Doll Hospital. 

2. Thin lustres with Garden Lavender Oil. 




FORGET-ME-NOT SUGAR BOWL AND PLATE— ALBERT W. HECKMAN 

The gray bands in the design are Dove Gray; flowers are blue and stems green, and a bit of Yellow Brown in centers of flowers. 

This may be carried our in flat enamels with good effect, using blue for flowers, Violet for buds and 

Dark Green for leaves and outlines of flowers, and a light Gray Green for bands in the design. 



REVISED BARGAIN LIST 

AT 75 CENTS PER DOZEN 

We offer until further notice the following studies with treatments all illustrated in Catalog "F" 



Catalogue F 
PAGE 

Elder Blossoms—Marshal Fry 20 

WUd Carrots— M. M. Mason 21 

Peacock Study— F. H. Rhead 23 

Some Color Schemes and their Application— Hugo Froehlich. . 24 

Scarlet Bean — Leta Horlocker 26 

Birds for Tile Decoration— Edith Alma Ross 26 

Poppies— T. McLennan 27 

Thistles^-Mary A. Neal 28 

Poppies— M. M. Mason .... 29 

Apples— M. M. Mason 

Oranges — M.M.Mason 

Iris— Laura Overly 

Phlox— Paul Putzki ....„ .... 33 

Plums — T. McLennan Hinman 34 

Marigolds— Laura B. Overly 35 

Zinnias — Mary Overbeck 36 

Orchids— P. Putzki... 37 

Poppy and Hawthorn Blossoms— H. B. Paist 38 

Cyclamen— P. Putzki 39 



Sweet Peas — T. McLennan-Hinman... 

Asters — T. McLennan-Hinman 

Anemone — A. AIsop-Robineau 

Mirror — Helen S. Williams 

Calla Lily— O. Foley 

Jack in the Pulpit — N. Beyer. 

Hydrangea— M. M. Mason 

Texas Wild Flowers— A. Donaldson 

Hollyhocks— P. Putzki 

Narcissus — T. McLennan-Hinman 

Cotton— A. Donaldson 

Rose Panels— Mrs. H. B. Baker 

Petunias — Paul Putzki 

Passion Flower — Alice W. Donaldson... 

Freesia — E. E. Daniels 

Azalea — Margaret D. Lindale 

Flowering Almond— E. E. Daniels 

Apple Blossoms — Alice W. Donaldson.. 
Larkspur— Edna S. Cave 



Catalogue F 
PAGE 

42 

43 

44 

45 

46 

46 



47 
48 
50 
51 
52 



55 
55 
56 



These will be sold postpaid at 75 cts. a dozen with treatments, until further notice. No order taken for less than one dozen. 
Choose your own assortment — The whole list sent free for two yearly subscriptions, one of which must be new. 
THIS PREMIUM OFFER GOOD UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO., SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



WE WELL SEND A SAMPLE COPY OF 

THE POTTER 

to any Beginner, Studio Potter, Teacher, or anyone 

interested in pottery making of the past, 

present, or future. 

Just send your name; state your activity or interest in pottery, 
and The Potter will come to you by return mail. 

Edited by FREDERICK HURTEN RHEAD. 

Published by THE POTTER PUBLISHING CO., 

Mission Canyon, Santa Barbara, California 

SUBSCRIPTION $3.00 a year, 35c a copy. Foreign §3.50 

The Potter is indorsed by Beginners, Professionals and Lay- 
men in the United States, Canada, England, Scotland, France, 
Belgium, Denmark, Japan, China, The Philippine Islands, 
Australia, and New Zealand. 



The COMPLETE SETS of 

The Sixteen Numbers of 

PALETTE and BENCH 

Are gone,! but we have SETS of 15 at $3.00 

Every number except October, 1909. 
HTPOSTPAID TO ANY PART OF THE WORLD 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO., Syracuse, N. Y. 



THESE BOOKS SENT POST-PAID 
ON RECEIPT OF PRICE 

Mm. Filkin's A. B. C. for Beginners in China Painting $1.00 

How to apply Enamels by Mabel C. Dibble. „.. ,B0 

Book on Methods for painting in Water Color by Gertrude Estabrook 1.00 

Colors and Coloring in China Painting Keramic Supply Co 26 

Lunn's Practical Pottery, 2 vols, (or vole, sold singly $2.15 each) 4.00 

The Teaoher of China Painting by D.M.Campana 79 

Firing China and Glass by Campana 37 

Book of Monograms by Campana „ 42 

Flat Enamel Decoration in China by Mrs. L. T. Steward 1.00 

Home Furnishing by Alice M. Kellogg (Pub. at 1.50) 75 

The Human Figure by Vanderpool „ 2,00 

Marks of American Potters by E. A. Barber 2.25 

American Glassware, Old and New 1.00 

Grand Feu Ceramics 5.00 

The Fruit Book 3.00 

The Rose Book 3.00 

The Art of Teaching China Decoration, Class Boom No. 1 3.00 

Flower Painting on Porcelain, Class Room No. 2 3.00 

Figure Painting on Porcelain and Firing, Class Room No. 3 3.00 

Conventional Decoration of Pottery and Porcelain, Class Room No. 4.. 3.00 

Book of Cups and Saucers 1.50 

Book of Little Things to Make 2.50 

Keramic Decorations Nellie F. Mcintosh ...1.00 

Eberlein & McClure's "Practical Book of Early American Arts and 

Crafts," post paid, net 6.00 

"Handicrafts for the Handicapped" by Herbert J. Hall and Mertiec M. 

C. Buck, post paid 1.35 

Pottery for Artists, Craftsmen and Teachers by Geo. J. Cox, 1.35 

A NEW BOOK 

Design and the Decoration of Porcelain, by Henrietta Barclay Paist 

Paper Cover $1.50 Cloth Cover $2.60 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 



When writing to advertisers please mention this magazine 



The entire contents of this Magazine are covered by the general copyright and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 



CONTENTS OF JUNE, J9J7 



Editorial 

At the Sign of the Brush and Palette 

New York Society Keramic Arts 

Design for Book Ends in Enamels 

Vase, Conventional Rose Motif (Color Study) 

Adaptation of the Color Study 

Decorated Flower Pot 

Symbolic Motifs 

Unit of Design, High Bush Cranberry 

Thy Linen Page 

Vase, Scene 

May E. Reynolds 

Bedroom Flower Vase 

Old Chinese Crackle Vase 

Answers to Correspondents 

Beginners* Corner 

Ice Tub 

Wild Flower Study 



Anita Gray Chandler 

Kathryn E. Cherry 

Kathryn E. Cherry 

Adelaide Alsop Robineau 

Maud M. Mason 

Mrs. Vernie Lockwood Williams 

Henrietta Barclay Paist 

Jetta Ehlers 

May E. Reynolds 

Adelaide Alsop Robineau 

Walter K. Titze 

Dorothea Warren O'Hara 

Jessie M. Bard 
Edith M. Hunt 
Florence Wyman Whitman 



23 

24 

25, 33 

26 

26 

27 

28 

29, 30-31 

32 
34 



ob 
37 
37 



38 
38 



THE CHERRY COLORS 

Colors for Painting and Tinting 
Special Colors for Busting 

THE MOST POPULAR ENAMELS 
ON THE MARKET 



Send for Complete Price List 
The Robineau Pottery, Syracuse, N. Y. 



GLASS COLORS! 

Send for special list of 17 very fine imported glass colors; 
put up only in half vials : 
Mixing Yellow 9c. Gold Yellow 19c. Transparent Orange 16c. 

Yellow Brown 13c. Hair Brown 14c. Best Red 14c, 

Deep Carmine 20c. Rose Pink 17c. Violet Purple 40c. 

Deep Ruby. 56c. Light Green 15c. Celestial Blue 13c. 

Peacock Blue 13c. Dark Green 15c. Transparent Black.. 13c. 
Outlining Black 10c. Soft Flux 13c. 

As an introductory offer, we will send these 17 colors, one 
half vial each, for $2.25 net (list price §3.10). 

ROMAN GOLD FOR GLASS $1.00 per box 

SILVER FOR GLASS 50c. per box 

The Robineau Pottery, Syracuse, N. Y. 



On account of the scarcity of the White China I am selling out 
my stock, including a new line of 

Satsuma and Haeger Pottery 



in 



assorted colors, just received, at list prices less 20% 




Why not own Edward F. Christman's new book 
of designs? Forty pages for only $1.00 



Write me about the Velvet 
Paper for Watercolor Work 
and which can be had in 
different shapes and sizes, 
from Place Cards up to Pic- 
tures for Framing and Serv- 
ing Trays. 




Satsuma Footed Vase 

Two sizes, 3} in. and 6J i 

Prices 85c and $1.95 

ASK YOUR DEALER FOR "SYRACUSE" OUTLINING INK. 
25e and 50c Postpaid. 
WEBER'S SPHINX GOLD 65c a box, $7 .20 down. 

SLEEPER'S CRUCIBLE GOLD " " 

Add two cents postage for each box. 

COOVER'S BLACK OUTLINES. CHINA PAINTERS' SUPPLIES. 

K.. E. CHERRY'S COLORS AND ENAMELS. 

JESSIE LOUISE CLAPP, 518 McCarthy Blk., SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



REMITTANCES!!! 

We prefer Money-Order or New York Draft but if check 
Is more convenient add the cost of Exchange which in N. Y. 
State is 10 cents.— KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO. 



When writing to advertisers please mention this magazine 




VASE-CONVENTIONAL ROSE MOTIF-kathryn e. cherry 

JUNE 1917 COPYRIGHT 

KERAMIC STUDIO 



KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO 



Vol. XIX, No. 2 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



Tune 1917 




E had fully intended at first to raise 
the subscription price of Keramic 
Studio to $5 per year beginning with 
the May issue. The increased cost 
of publishing has forced Magazines 
either to raise the price of sub- 
scriptions or advertisements, or to 
struggle along without any profit. 
Several have stopped publication. 
And now Congress wants to increase 
the rates of postage so that they will be almost prohibitive. 
We hope, however, that this increase will not be carried to the 
extreme point suggested at first. At $5 a year now Keramic 
Studio would be cheaper than it was at $4 before the war. 
However, when we considered the increased cost of everything 
to our subscribers, from luxuries to necessities, and the pros- 
pect of still greater burdens for them to bear, we had 
not the heart to add an extra straw and we will try to pull 
through at the old price until conditions are more settled. 
•> ♦ ♦ 
There has been a slight advance in subscriptions since last 
December, when we began the new department editorial work. 
That change has been much appreciated by teachers through- 
out the country and has been the means of bringing the publi- 
cation to the attention of many more departments of art in 
colleges and schools. While this is very gratifying to us, we 
wish to impress upon you the need of your cooperation and 
help to increase the subscriptions. 

Keramic Studio has done its utmost for the benefit of 
Ceramic Art and we believe this fact is fully appreciated by 
those who are competent to judge. But we need more sub- 
stantial help than mere praise, although we are thankful for 
both. Will you not, each one of you, make an effort to interest 
some of your friends in this magazine ? If you will send in the 
names of people who are interested in this work but unfamiliar 
with Keramic, we will be glad to communicate with them, and 
mail sample copies, lists of books, etc. Let us work together ! 

The next issue will be given up almost entirely to the 
exhibit of the Keramic Society of Greater New York which 
is full of suggestions for decorators. Among other things it 
will be noted that quite a few are taking up the decoration of 
glass. We shall look for interesting developments along this 
line. We are showing in the present issue some useful 
illustrations of the exhibit of the old New York Society of 
Keramic Arts. The group of lamp vases, etc., by Miss Mason 
is especially notable for the strong designing. Mrs. Cherry's 
exhibit contains many unique decorations as usual. It is to 
be regretted that the coloring cannot be shown, as this con- 
stitutes the chief charm. 

While eveiyone is thinking of the war and working for 
the various relief societies, there is danger that ceramic work 
will be neglected for a time, especially since the difficulty of 
procuring ware for decoration has grown more or less acute. 
It seems to us that now would be a good time to put our efforts 
rather on^working out designs on paper and trying various 
color schemes. Such work can be taken up at odd times and 



places and need not interfere with more serious duties. A 
good plan would be to take the photos of exhibits and enlarge 
some design, adapting to whatever piece you may have in 
mind to decorate later, changing the motif both in size and 
arrangement to fit different shapes. Then take some flower 
or bird studies, make conventionalized motifs from them on 
the order of the designs used in the exhibit and try to arrange 
in the same manner. This would be fine practice. 

Why do we of late confine our efforts at designing to 
flowers and birds? Why not try a few animals or fish or 
humans, we must not get into a rut even though it is an agree- 
able one. Work out on linen the same motifs you have used 
on your china and we will arrange a competition for the fall. 
We would be pleased to have our subscribers write and sug- 
gest what sort of competition they would like, whether for 
breakfast, dinner, tea or special sets such as porch sets, card 
sets, etc., etc. 



There are two spring flowers in my garden that I 
have never seen used in design. They are most attrac- 
tive both in color and form. One is comfry, a low growing 
plant with white dotted leaves and flowers similar to the for- 
get-me-not, but larger, shading from blue in the open flower, 
through lavender, to deep pink in the bud; the other is the 
Virginia blue bell which grows somewhat taller with drooping 
clusters of heavenly blue flowers which also shade to pink in 
the bud. It has a rosette of whitish green leaves at the base. 
To know either of these flowers is to take them to your heart. 

We have been promised an article soon on the various 
undecorated wares that can be picked up either in the art 
stores or oriental shops or in unexpected places, and which 
are both charming and odd in color and shape. Many of the 
sets decorated for exhibition are of these wares: Japanese, 
Italian, Wedgwood and what not. Keep an eye out always 
for finds in this line. That is one good that has come out of 
the war, we are learning the possibilities of many wares we have 
not known before. Truly it is an ill wind that blows nobody 
any good. We may possibly come across American made 
potteries that will be available. Let us hope so, for we need 
greatly to develop an American ware for the decorating market. 
»> ♦ ♦ 
AN EXCEPTIONAL OFFER! 

Those who send in their subscriptions for either six months 

or one year new, or re-newal, will be entitled to the following 

offer, until further notice : 50 per cent discount on the following 

books published by us : Regular price 

Classroom No. 1 Art of Teaching China Decoration.... $3.00 

" " 2 Flower Painting on Porcelain 3.00 

" 3 Figure Painting on Porcelain & Firing 3.00 

" 4 Conventional Dec. of Porcelain 3.00 

"Little Things To Make" 2.50 

"Cups and Saucers" 1.50 

This is an opportunity for teachers and is open for only a 
short time. It will be well to take advantage of it as soon as 
possible. We frankly admit that it is only to stimulate sub- 
scriptions during the summer season. 



24 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



ANITA GRAY CHANDLER 

7 Edison Avenue. Tufts College, Mass. 



Page Editor 




AT THE SIGN 

OF THE 
BRUSH AND PALETTE 

This is Ye Old Art Inn 

where the worker of Arts and 
Crafts may rest a bit and par- 
take of refreshment. 



WHERE is all the poetry our women painters were going 
to bring into the world of art to elevate mankind ?" 
inquires the critic of The Art World in an acid discussion of 
certain nudes in the Spring Exhibition of the National Academy, 
painted by three Boston women, Gertrude Fisk, Helen Turner 
and Harriette Clark. "Where is the moral superiority that 
they were to contribute to save a race from slipping back into 
the tophet of animalism, of which we have heard so much? 
If our women painters can't do better they had better go back 
to china painting or washing dishes, then they will at least be 
doing something really useful and not make their own sex 
blush for them." He inserts one drop of balm into the acid — 
china painting is "really useful," as useful as dish washing. 
He probably has not seen an exhibition of china for a decade, 
and the names of Callowhill, Cherry, Mason, O'Hara and 
Paist mean nothing to him. 

In an interesting article entitled The Rise of American 
China Painting, Lida Rose McCabe tells of Dorothea Warren 
O'Hara's conversion from the naturalistic to the conventional 
school of decoration. In the course of the interview Mrs. 
O'Hara is reported as saying, "When I think of the atrocious 
things I painted in response to popular demand, I wonder how 
I can ever be forgiven! I taught china painting in Kansas 
and Montana. Money was imperative and it was the only 
way I could earn it. But while I taught and perpetrated I 
felt intuitively that I was doing wrong. Subconsciously, I 
knew I was sowing seeds of ugliness where flowers of beauty 
were possible. How to bring about the latter miracle was 
mystery to me. There were no museums or collections, no 
art journals, illustrated magazines or text books accessible 
to art gropers of the Western country. While teaching in 
Montana my crimes in the name of art got on my nerves! I 
broke away and came East. At the Philadelphia Centennial 
Exposition I met a friend. Passing a case of china she said, 
'Was there ever anything so horrible?' Glancing over her 
shoulder I saw the work of my Montana pupils. 'Horrible,' 
I repeated. 'Let's not look at it!' And I dragged her away." 
From the East Mrs. O'Hara went to study in Germany and 
England. "In the European galleries," she continues, "I 
wakened to the beauty of Chinese, Japanese and Persian 
potteries." It is of interest to note that the Museum of 
Tokio has since purchased two of her enameled jars for its 
permanent collection. 



The Boston Museum of Fine Arts has recently acquired 
through the generosity of Denman W. Ross his priceless col- 
lection of Chinese and Japanese pottery, porcelain, silk hang- 
ings and jewelled sword cases. These have been in the 
museum as a loan collection for some time. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 

The Metropolitan Museum gives a course of lectures that 
is a little out of the ordinary, to say the least. It is designed 
especially for the interests of sales people, buyers and design- 
ers of the department stores. Professor Grace Cornell of 
Teachers' College conducts a seminar every Saturday evening 
at 8 o'clock. These are most informal and questions are 
solicited. The course tries to show how to recognize good 
color, good line, and the other qualities that give value to art. 

The 21st annual celebration of Founder's Day was ob- 
served at Carnegie Institute on April 26. 

An exhibition of the art of color printing was opened at 
the Rhode Island School of Design on April 24. 




Graceful example of Japanese pottery, Korean influence. The first pottery 
made in Koda bears the date 1632 and was the work of a Korean named 
Sonfcai. Early pieces have white brush marks under the glaze. Later 
the decoration takes the form of lines in Mishima. Both of these meth- 
ods are Korean. Finally a true Japanese method developed, bringing 
in designs of natural objects, impressed, of plum-blossoms and bamboo. 

This jar has looped handles, a pottery cover, and is decorated with a large 
peony in white Mishima. It is five inches tall. 

(Courtesy of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts.) 

An exhibition of lustrous gold china and decorated glass 
by Sidney T. Callowhill attracted a number of visitors to the 
Arts and Crafts Shop, Boston, during the months of April 
and May. Mr. Callowhill's lustres are so well known it is 
useless to describe them here, but his glass decoration is some- 
thing new, taken up within the past year, and quite probably 
enforced by the scarcity of suitable shapes in white china. 
He uses both transparent and opaque colors with excellent 
effect. All the designs are simple, flat, delicately colored, 
and decidedly pleasing. The entire exhibition was posed 
against effective backgrounds of hand-made linens and black 
velvet. 

There has been a long felt need for just such a text book 
as Henrietta Barclay Paist has given to china decorators in 

(Continued on page 37) 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



25 




PLACE PLATES— MAUD M. MASON 




PLACE PLATES IN SILVER 
Designed by Maud M. Mason Executed by Elizabeth M. Vanderhoof 




GROUP OF DECORATIVE PIECES— MAUD M. MASON 
NEW YORK SOCIETY KERAMIC ARTS 



26 

KATHRYN E. CHERRY - 

Marina Building, St. Louis. Mo. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 

Page Editor 



DESIGN FOR BOOK ENDS IN ENAMELS 

BACKGROUND is Night Blue. Stem lines are Jasmine. 
Leaves are Leaf Green. Jar is Jasmine. Light grey in 
flower Silver Grey. Medium Grey on flowers Satsuma. 
Dark in flower Lilac. Large dots Lavender. Small dots 
Orange Red. Small circle flowers Jasmine. 



VASE, CONVENTIONAL ROSE MOTIF (Color Study) 

OUTLINE design with Black. Put green gold in bands 
then fire. Stems are Purple Grey (enamels.) Leaves, 
Peacock Green. Small dots Mulberry. Circle, flowers are 
Wistaria. Centers, Jasmine. Dark in large flowers, Warmest 
Pink. Lightest color, Italian Pink. Go over the gold again 
then fire. If enamels need retouching go over with same colors 
If vase is Satsuma, when all finished, make a bucket of very 
strong black tea and put the vase into this, warm it up several 




times with jar in tea, allow it to stand two days; this gives the 
jar a beautiful tone and it brings background up to the tone 
of enamels and black outline. 




DESIGN FOR TEA TILE OR BOOK ENDS, ENAMELS— KATHRYN E. CHERRY 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



27 




ADAPTATIONS OF THE COLOR STUDY— ADELAIDE ALSOP ROBINEAU 



23 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




MAUD M. MASON ----- p AGE Editor 

218 East 59th Street, New York City 

DECORATED FLOWER POT 

THE little flower pot illustrated was of a grey crackled 
Japanese ware that sets in a saucer of the same ware. 
Soft enamels were used in its decoration, the blacks, spaces, 
lines, etc., being put in with Black Enamel. The light grey 



in the center of the flower, the wing of the bird and its] head 
feather are laid with equal parts of Soft Yellow and Orange 
Enamels. For the leaves use equal parts Florentine and 
Emerald Green for a blueish green, or if a warmer green is 
preferred use Willow Green. The little berries are in Ver- 
milion Enamel. The body of the bird is in Austrian Blue 
Enamel as are also the wide bands at the edges of the pieces 
and the center of the flower. For the flower use Light Carmine. 
Lines under the blue bands are Yellow. The design is used 
twice and is placed on opposite sides of the pot. The black 
lines at the base are repeated on the inner rim of the saucer. 
Attractive flower pots may be bought in the Sedji ■ ware, 
upon which very charming color effects may be obtained. 

COUNTY FAIRS 

ONE of the best opportunities it seems to me to arouse 
interest in beautiful porcelains and table decorations, 
is given us in the annual exhibitions at the State and County 
Fairs. These Fairs are attended by thousands of people of 
all classes eager to see the best products of the community, 
exhibited there, and could be more useful and helpful in the 
community, if the very best workers would participate in 
them. The prizes in the ceramic class are usually very liberal 
and numerous, covering many different kinds of articles. 

I wish that every one acquainted with such exhibitions 
would send in early announcements of them to the Editor of 
the Keramic Studio for publication, in order that every one 
may know of these opportunities for exhibitions and then 
plans may be carried out for work that would be eligible for 
prizes. Let every one join in making this year, artistic 




KERAMIC STUDIO 



29 



accomplishments of these ceramic shows. Below will be found 
a list of prizes offered at the Queens County Fair, Long Island: 

Department M 

Section 2 

Judge — Maud M. Mason, New York City. 

All exhibits competing for premiums in this Department must be re- 
ceived before 6 p. m., on Monday, September 24, otherwise they may be 
debarred from the competition. 

DECORATED PORCELAIN— ORIGINAL IN DESIGN 

Class 1st 2d 
No. Prize Prize 
32 — Breakfast, luncheon or dinner set, arranged on table with 
suitable linens and flower decorations, service for six peo- 
ple $15 §10 

33 — Afternoon tea or individual breakfast set, linen, tray, etc . 7 5 

34 — Decorated lamp vase 7 5 

35— Decorated bowl 5 3 

36 — Best piece of work executed in enamels 5 3 

37 — Best piece of work executed in lustre 5 3 

38 — Monogram design for plate 5 3 




FOR OUR INSPIRATION 

THE bowl illustrated this month for our inspiration is 
one in the South Kensington Museum collections. It 
has always interested me for the beautiful spacing of its nu- 
merous borders. Only the back of the bowl is shown and it 
is especially entertaining to note the manner in which the 
base has been treated. Around the largest part of the bowl 
we have our most important and dominating border, the nar- 
row and brilliant borders at its sides framing and giving it 
importance, while the other borders play their part in covering 
• the surface and making an interesting whole. The propor- 
tions of every space and line are all so carefully considered and 
thoroughly satisfying that I think the design affords us a fine 
lesson in the spacing of borders on our porcelains whether we 
are using one or many. 

*• * 

STUDIO NOTE 

After a long sojourn on the Pacific Coast Miss Fannie M. 
Scammell has returned to New York City. Her studio is 
located at 244 West 104th St. 



MRS. VERNIE LOCKWOOD WILLIAMS - Page Editor 

University of Pittsburg. Home Studio, 52 W. Maiden St., Washington, Pa. 

SYMBOLIC MOTIFS (Page 30) 

NO. 1. Border on Poncho Feather cloak from Peru. 
These Ponchos were made as a rug with a slit in the 
center to admit the head. 

Treatment. — Dark portion of spiral, also first band at 
the top, Black. Light portion of spiral, Ivory Yellow; Sec- 
ond band at the top and first band at base, Yellow Red; 
band at top, Banding Blue; wide band at base, Lemon Yellow. 

No. 2. Vulture. From center of large dish found in 
Mexico. 

Treatment. — Black portions, Mrs. Cherry's Pompadour. 
Medium grey tone, Mason's Dark Yellow Brown. Light 
grey tone a neutralized Ivory. White spaces, white of china. 
Outlines, Black. 

No. 3. From a carved wooden basket made by the 
Indians of the Northwest. Pottery was almost unknown to 
these Indians. But every available object was carved. Pre- 
historic south and central America are considered as the great 
countries for pottery. 

Treatment. — White spaces, Ivory. Black spaces, Yellow 
Ochre, grey spaces, Aztec Blue, dark spot in oval, Yellow Red. 

No. 4. Design for wooden club used by the Indians of 
Brazil as an Insignia of Rank. 

Treatment. — Black portions, Yellow Red; medium tone, 
Aztec Blue; light grey tone Yellow Green neutralized. 

Nos. 5 and 9. Early Mexican Stamps for making a 
pattern on the body, as tatooing was a universal custom. 

Treatment for No. 5. Black portion, Cherry's Pompa- 
dour; light grey spaces, Mason's Ivory; white portions, white 
of china; outlines, Black. 

Treatment of No. 9 — Background, Yellow Red; line 
design, Black; light figures, Dark Blue; and Yellow for cir- 
cular spots. 

Nos. 6 and 8. Wooden Ear Plugs from Ancient Peru. 
Ear ornamentations were one of the distinguishing marks of 
an Inca. 

Treatment for No. 6. — Black portion, Black; space at 
the right of figure in circle, Yellow Ochre neutralized ; medium 
grey spaces, Aztec Blue; light spaces, Ivory. 

Treatment for No. 8. — Dark spaces, Yellow Red; dark 
grey space, Yellow Green two-thirds, Banding Blue one- 
third; medium grey space, Royal Blue. 

No. 7. From an Old Peruvian jug found in Ethnolo- 
gical Museum in Berlin. 

Treatment. — Background of border, Black; light spaces, 
Light Yellow Ochre; medium grey spaces, Dark Yellow Brown; 
dark spaces, Cherry's Pompadour. 

No. 10. Taken from Fruit Basket woven by Modoc 
Indians. 

Treatment. — Background is the same green as in No. 8. 
Dark grey spaces, Dark Yellow Brown with very little Black 
added. Bands Black. 

No. 11. Taken from a Mask worn by North West and 
South American Indians during a "Love Story" dance. 

Treatment. — Light grey spaces, Royal Blue; medium 
grey spaces, Albert Yellow; black spaces, Black. 

No. 12. Taken from Dakota Skin-Cloak painted in 
their Picture Writing when going to War. 

Treatment. — Black spaces, Black; spots, Albert Yellow; 
triangular shapes, white of china. 



30 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




MOTIFS TAKEN FROM HISTORY OF MANKIND VOL. II, BY F. RATZEL (Treatments page 29) 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



31 



ggn ^ g» ip ream 



IV 



Vila 



li-l*l 



#1 #1 



#1 



VII d 




III 




itt tt itfe 




b a 




VII b 



VII c 



t2/(MMIK2^lkl 




VI VIII 

SUGGESTIONS FROM SYMBOLIC MOTIFS— MRS. VERNIE LOCKWOOD WILLIAMS 



32 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




MRS. HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST - Page Editor 

2298 Commonwealth Ave., St. Paul, Minn. 

THE unit of design shown is from the high bush cranberry 
and is intended to be shown in different scale. The col- 
oring is in two shades of green and scarlet with black outlines 
and will be effective repeated on bowls, vases, jardinieres, etc., 
and if reduced can be made to fit any shape or size of piece. 

THEORY OF COLOR LECTURE 

THE last of a series of six evening lectures under the 
auspices of the Twin City Keramic Club was given in 
Minneapolis, April 12th, by Lauros Phoenix of the Minnea- 
polis School of Art. 

Mr. Phoenix explained his system of teaching color har- 
mony by the use of the musical scale — arranging the colors 
(hues) according to their vibratory relation to the musical 
notes; and finding his analogy for color chords in the musical 
chords of the scale. It is a system which involves the study 
of the fundamentals of music and depends for its logic on a 
science which is to say the least in its infancy (in a hypothet- 
ical stage). As an arbitrary system it affords a definite method 
of selecting color schemes, and every attempt to rescue the 
subject of color from the chaotic methods of the past and to 
formulate a system based on color values and color intensity 
is an effort worthy of our consideration and study, and the 



fact that modern musical systems are looking to color for 
analysis, are based on the relation of color to sound, shows 
that science has sensed an underlying truth and is working 
towards a solution. 

COLLECTION OF PORCELAIN AND POTTERY 

THE Twin City Keramic Club (St. Paul and Minneapolis) 
held the last of a series of luncheons Friday, April 13th, 
followed by a visit to the T. B. Walker Art Galleries, Minne- 
polis, and a talk on keramics by the Curator of the Galleries. 

The collection embraces Chinese, Korean, Japanese. 
Greek, Old Persian and Rakka ware and Wedgwood. The 
Chinese forms the major portion of the collection and embraces 
no less than eight dynasties. There are three cabinets of 
magnificient "Lang-yao" or "Sang de boeuf," one of rich 
"Peach bloom," one of beautiful "Hawthorne," several cabi- 
nets of blue and white, two of ornamented "mirror black" 
one of blues and one of greens. Nearly all from the great 
ceramic period covered by the reigns of "ChienLung" (1736- 
1795), "Yang Cheng," (1723-1736), "Kang-hsi (1662-1723). 
There are splendid examples of Old Fer Ting of Sung and 
Ming dynasties; Taoist sacrifice vessels of the Southern Lung 
dynasty; and Cochin china and other wares of the Yuan dy- 
nasty. 

The collection of old Ming fills a number of cabinets and 
embraces three immense reticulated (or pierced) Temple jars. 
One cabinet contains a grand collection of porcelain, earthen- 
ware and mosaic idols in crackle, plain white and ornamented 
glazes and other specimens too numerous to mention. 

The reducing heat process in firing by which the coloring 
of the glaze is affected and different colors and effects are 
produced was explained by the Curator in an interesting and 
instructive manner. 

There is one cabinet each of Korean and Japanese ware 
and while Korea is supposed to have learned the art from China 
many centuries before the Christian era, the specimens showed 
little characteristic resemblance to the Chinese. The art is 
supposed to have been introduced into Japan through Korea 
about 200 A. D., however excavations in burial grounds in 
Japan, dating as early as the sixth century B. C, have pro- 
duced examples of crude pottery. 

It was during the period of Tokergawa Shoguns (1603-1868) 




KERAMIC STUDIO 



33 



that keramic art in Japan attained its greatest perfection 
and though Satsuma ware has the distinction of being the 
most beautiful ware produced in Japan, yet in the history of 
keramics most of the great names are associated with "Kiota", 
"Ninsei", "Kenzan" and "Hozen." In the collection are 
examples of most of the great artists — many by Takemoto 
and several vases of Royal Satsuma, besides an important 
vase of this renowned ware in another room of the Galleries. 

The two cabinets of ancient Greek pottery contain one 
of the most notable collections of this class in America. There 
are important examples treating from the 6th to the 1st cen- 
tury B. C, the choicest and most valuable from the collection 
of Mr. H. De Morgan of New York City. 

In the Persian collection are fine old examples, a number 
of which were found in the ruins of the palace and tomb of 




Haroun al Raschid (of Arabian Nights fame). The "Rakka" 
group is made up of objects taken from the ruins of the ancient 
city of Rhagis (or Ragis) now a heap of ruins in Central Persia. 
In the Wedgwood collection is one of the 25 copies made by 
Josiah Wedgwood of the famous Barberini vase (now in the 
British Museum) as well as other specimens made by this 
master in the zenith of his fame. The collection is made 
comprehensive by cards placed at the base of each object, 
giving name of shape, glaze, color and period and date of 
manufacture, in many instances a brief interpretation of the 
ornamentation. 




NEWCOMB POTTERY 



FLOWER GARDEN PLACE PLATES— MAUD M. MASON 




GROUP OF DECORATIVE PIECES— KATHRYN E. CHERRY 
NEW YORK SOCIETY KERAMIC ARTS 



34 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




THE LINEN PAGE. 

JETTA EHLERS ------ Page Editor 

i 8 East Kinney Street, Newark, N. J. 

A VISIT TO THE EXHIBITIONS 

T^HIS being the season for exhibitions, perhaps the read- 
*- ers of the linen page may be interested in hearing about 
some of the things which were shown. The editor has at- 
tended three exhibitions within the month, each of them making 
a special point of including table linens. The public generally 
showed the keenest interest in the subject. With our own 
club it was the first time an exhibit of the kind had been at- 
tempted. The results were most gratifying, one fact standing 
out, namely: that in no way did the linens detract from the 
interest in the china, some people to the contrary. We watched 
very carefully the attitude of the public on this point, and 
came to the conclusion that our china never before appeared 
to so good an advantage, nor attracted more attention. 

In the various exhibitions visited there were things weird 
and bizarre, to be expected, one presumes, in the development 
of any new idea. Just whether many people could be brought 
around to accepting silk dress goods as a covering for a dinner 
table or not, is a doubtful question. And yet, that was one 
thing seen in making the rounds of the galleries. Wonderful 
color, stunning china and a truly artistic ensemble we grant. 
Perhaps one is terribly materialistic in feeling that in "fitness 
to purpose" it was wrong. The fabric was a beautiful pink 
brocaded crepe-de-chine or some such oriental weave. A 
band of cream colored filet extended the length of the cloth 
through the center, and it was edged with narrow filet, with 
wider bands at either end. A china comport in the center 
held artificial fruit, a luscious looking peach exactly repeating 
the pink of the cloth. 

Another table in the same gallery showed a cloth of a 
dull orange silk crepe. The center piece was a silver bowl in 
which were arranged calendrelas. The bowl reflected in the 
most wonderful way the color of both cloth and flowers. No 
recollection of napkins comes to me with either set. One 
would surely feel staggered at wiping one's mouth with a crepe- 
de-chine napkin. A rather weird effect was attained by the 



combination, on one set, of woodblock and worsted work. It 
was the only one having this treatment seen in any exhibi- 
tion. Here again the question arises of "fitness to purpose." 
Of course one must not be too conservative about these things. 
On the other hand one must not sacrifice all the canons of 
beauty in straining for something ususual. 

This thought persisted, not only in regard to the linens 
but also the china. Another point which may interest you 
is that on many things tassels were used. These were made 
up of colored beads or of painted button molds, in many in- 
stances a combination of both. Some were silvered. These 
were strung together and were perfectly stunning as to color 
and arrangement. They were put on by means of snap fast- 
eners so that they could be removed when the piece was laun- 
dered. Some people admired them immensely, others scoffed. 
I heard within the space of a few seconds one person call them 
"perfectly darling" and another declare them "tawdry." 
Amongst other things was a set of napkins of natural colored 
pongee silk, with charming woodblock in soft pastel colors. 
In one corner an eyelet was worked and into this was caught 
a tassel made of beads. Old fashioned rick-rack braid dyed 
to match the linen was used to finish the edges of a tray set. 
Much of this which has been described would surely shock 
many people. Some of us I am sure need shocking. If I 
have dwelt at too great length upon these ultra-modern things, 
it has been solely to show what the workers are doing that is 
truly novel. 

Along with the extreme things were many beautiful ones, 
thoroughly in the spirit of the new art movement. There 
was little if anything shown that was commonplace; and much 
that was perfectly charming. Some choice Russian things 
with touches of beautiful needlework were seen. A wonder- 
ful set of Italian needlework also was shown. For the most 
part the linens were designed and executed by the various 
members. One of the most refined sets consisted of a runner, 
table mats and napkins of oyster white linen, with a very 
narrow row of what I believe is called cable stitch about a 
half inch from the hem. Upon the mats and runner another 
row was added about two inches from the other at opposite 
ends. The spacing of the whole set was the perfection of 
simple beauty. A set which attracted much attention was 
made of a rather dark blue linen, the centerpiece and doilies 
being round with fringed edges. On this was shown a set 
of wistaria china with blue enamel decoration. This was the 
only thing of its kind seen along the line. 

In looking back over the exhibitions the conviction comes 
that our field of ceramics has broadened wonderfully. In the 
broadening process naturally some things are perpetrated 
which one cannot accept. Do not allow this to stand in the 
way of our appreciation of the good in it all. 



After having seen all this wealth of good things, our little 
napkin of this month's illustration looks rather tame. How- 
ever, one can't live at concert pitch all the time so one needs 
something to "let down" on. This is a good example of how 
cross-stitch may be introduced. One word of advice about 
cross-stitch, unless the stitches are very small and close, "don't." 
To do this use a very fine canvas pulling it out from under 
after the design is completed. As this canvas is not to be had 
now on account of the war, a rather stiff scrim may be used in 
its place and answers fairly well. The other work on the 
napkin is the familiar fagoting, a finish which seems to fit in 
with so many things. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



35 



MAY E. REYNOLDS - - - - - - Page Editor 

116 Auditorium Building, Chicago, 111. 

VASE, SCENE 

ClRST Fire — Put in design with outlining ink, paint in 
* darker band where indicated near top, in Old Dutch 
Blue, also design at lower part of scene, in Old Dutch Blue. 
Paint in scene, using Dark Green and Best Black for the trees, 
for the light brush Violet of Iron, and in the darker parts Brown 
Green, Moss Green and a little Dark Green. Hills in back- 
ground in Violet, Copenhagen Grey, with the slightest touch 
of Old Dutch Blue, water in Russian Green, and a trifle of 
Deep Blue Green, also a touch of Peacock Blue. Hill in fore- 
ground in Moss Green, Brown Green, Empire Green, Dark 
Green, a touch of Finishing Brown and Violet of Iron. 

Second Fire — Dust on tint at top of vase in one part 
Apple Green and two parts Grey Glaze, also tint where in- 
dicated near scene Grey Glaze dusted on next to Old Dutch 
Blue band and at base of vase. Retouch the scene in same 
colors as used in first fire, and go over the band and the design 
below scene with Old Dutch Blue. 



About twelve years ago she opened her studio for china 
painting in the Auditorium Building, Chicago, and has since 
devoted her talent to that work exclusively. 

Miss Reynolds has taught in most of the larger cities and 
is well known from coast to coast. 




MAY E. REYNOLDS 

MISS MAY E. REYNOLDS began her career by attending 
the Art Academy of Cincinnati, Ohio, where she studied 
for four years under Duveneck, Meakin, and other teachers of 
note. While a student she was selected to exhibit three por- 
traits in oil at the Eighth Annual Exhibition of American Art, 
in Cincinnati, in 1901, exhibiting at this time with artists of 
national fame, as Chase, Tarbell, Childe Hassan, and Wendt. 
Miss Reynolds was graduated from the Art Academy in 1901, 
and went from there to New York, where she studied at the 
Art Students League under the tuition of Walter Appleton 
Clarke, Vincent Du Mond and others. After leaving the 
League Miss Reynolds did poster work and designing in New 
York 

While in Cincinnati Miss Reynolds was an active member 
of the Woman's Art Club, and is also a member of the New 
York Keramic Club. 




36 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




BEDROOM FLOWER VASE— WALTER K. TITZE 



(Treatment page 37) 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



WALTER K. TITZE - - - 

210 Fuller Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. 



Page Editor 



BEDROOM FLOWER VASE (Page 36) 

ClRST Fire — Trace design in carefully. All black bands 
*• and lines are black, painted on, padded and then dusted 
with same color. Paint flowers with Yellow for Painting, 
Albert Yellow, Yellow Brown, and for shadows Yellow Brown 
and Brown Green and in some places add a touch of Violet. 
Leaves in Shading Green and a touch of Violet. Small wild 
aster forms in Black as well as winding stem and leaves. 

Second Fire — Dust entire vase with 1 part Yellow for 
Dusting, 1 part Coffee Brown and 2 parts Ivory Glaze. Wipe 
out only prominent flowers, leaving all the rest under. Fire. 

Third Fire — Wide grey bands are the same color as used 
in second fire for entire background. They can be painted 
or dusted on. Retouch flowers and leaves. It is very im- 
portant you get Black on even in first fire as it must be covered 
with dusted color second fire. 

AT THE SIGN OF THE BRUSH AND PALETTE 

(Continued from page 24) 

Design and the Decoration of Porcelain. These lessons were 
given serially in Keramic Studio a year ago, and created a 
great deal of attention at the time. But in book form they 
gain a force and unity which should make them invaluable to 
the studio and class room. There is a foreword on the intro- 
duction of China Painting in America that yields important 
information to the student. Design and the Decoration of 
Porcelain is dealt with in a convincing and understandable 
manner, and together with the excellent illustrations, should 
prove as beneficial as a course of personal instruction. 

The last exhibition in historic Copley Hall was given this 
Spring when the Spanish King's tapestries were shown in Boston. 
Copley Hall is a low wooden structure on Clarendon Street, 
looking very much like a large stable if it were not for the 
studio skylights in the roof. Most of the famous Boston ex- 
hibitions have been given here. Raemaekers' cartoons were 
shown here last Autumn and Zuloaga's paintings this Winter, 
perhaps the most notable event of them all. When the Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology moved across the Charles 
to its new home in Cambridge, the old buildings were sold, 
and Copley Hall coming under the same property, was doomed. 
It has been the scene of many a brilliant artists' frolic and 
private exhibition. 



The annual election of the Art Lovers Club of Greater 
Boston took place the last of April with the following officers 
installed for the season of 1907-0908: President, Mrs. Anita 
Gray Chandler (re-elected); Vice-President, Mrs. Edward 
Rockwell (re-elected); Secretary, Mrs. W. S. Brown; Treas- 
urer, Mrs. A. Laurence Pouleur; Librarian, Miss L. H. Barnard. 
It was voted to contribute all money usually invested in gift 
pictures to the Red Cross Fund. The members have also 
denied themselves their annual Spring Luncheon, contributing 
fees for the same to Red Cross work. 



*3^. 




DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 

132 East 19th Street, New York City 



37 

Page Editor 



OLD CHINESE CRACKLE VASE 

HPHIS vase is of old Chinese crackle ware and was picked up 
-1 in an old Chinese shop. It may be possible to dupli- 
cate the shape in Satsuma. 

The design is earned out with Old Chinese Blue Enamel, 
except the little round flower in centers of ovals. This flower 
is Rhodian Red Enamel with Old Chinese Blue Enamel center 
and Bright Sea Green Enamel for the stems. The light part 
in the half circle around the dots in center is Rhodian Red 
Enamel. 




ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

B. F. K. — Is White Gold as durable as other golds? 1 used it on a set 
of dishes and it is chipping off. 

Yes, it is as durable. If it chips off it probably was applied too heavy, 
but if it is just wearing off, any gold will do that with much usage. 

E. L. S. — Please give me a color scheme for rase in June, 1905, magazine 
page 26 by Mrs. Chas. Warner. 

To be carried out in enamels on Belleek or Satsuma. Outline in Black. 
Center flower at both top and bottom is equal parts Warmest Pink and White. 
The two at the side are Warmest Pink. The two turned over blossoms at 
the top and the tips of the small buds are Mulberry. Leaves are Florentine 
No. 12. Buds and calyx are Leaf Green. Stamen are 1 Naples and 2 White. 
Dots back of design are Gold. 

Note: — The title of the Sung pottery in the May number 
should read T'zn-chow instead of I'zn-chow. The printer is 
not to blame for the error since the Inn-keeper's T's look 
like I's. 



38 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




ICE TUB— EDITH M. HUNT 

BEGINNERS' CORNER 

JESSIE M. BARD ------ Page Editor 

Dickinson Seminary, Williamsport, Pa. 

TREATMENT FOR ICE TUB 

TRACE the design on the china and go over the lines with 
India Ink with light grey lines and make necessary 
corrections while inking. If the lines look black when the 
drawing is completed rub lightly over them with a small piece 
of fine emery or sand paper until the lines are grey. Heavy 
lines interfere with the work when dry dusting. Oil the 
flower forms with Special Medium, (for instructions see Dec. 
magazine) and dust with Water Blue. Oil the semi-circular 
form in upper border and dust with Water Green. Oil leaves 
and broken bands and dust with 3 parts Bright Green, \ part 
Grey Blue, 2 parts Ivory Glaze. The band around center 
panels and the wide band at upper edge are Green Gold. 

Second Fire — If any of the colors need patching they can 
be painted in. Paint the center panels with a very thin wash 
of Copenhagen Blue. Retouch the Gold. 

A GOOD BEGINNING MAKETH A BETTER ENDING 

Fannie Manser 

IF the beginner in china painting has never handled a brush, 
her first piece of china should be a flat surface, such as a 
plate or tile, so that strict attention can be paid to the use of 
the brush, without much thought being given to the holding 
of the china. 

Tinting is the first thing taught. Tube colors are 
preferable, because they require but little grinding, but if 
powder colors are used, they must be thoroughly ground until 
all grit disappears. Pour the color on a piece of ground glass, 
add to the paint a good medium, three or four drops, stir well 
with a palette knife until the color is mixed to a consistancy 
to drop from the knife. The brush to be used should be a 
broad flat camel's hair brush, which before using should be 
put into hot water for a while — as this keeps the hairs from 
falling out. Take a piece of silk (old white silk is best) place 
over a piece of cotton or wool batting for a pad. This is to 
pounce the paint, which must be put on with quick even strokes. 
Change the pad several times until the tint is a delicate shade. 
Thick paint never fires well. If a hair comes out of the brush 
onto the paint, take your china pencil point and press lightly 
on the hair and it will come off. The china is ready to fire. 

For. the second fire, select a simple design or motif, for 
the tinted piece. If you can make your own designs, use 
them, if not, hunt through the Keramic Studio until a simple 



motif presents itself; after selecting the design, take the thin 
paper which looks like oiled tissue paper, and lay over the 
design. The India ink and pen can now be used to draw the 
design on the paper accurately; after this is done, lay this 
same drawing on the plate where it is to be painted (which 
can be held in place with plasticene wax), slip the black carbon 
or graphite paper under the design, go over the lines with a tracer 
or a sharp hard pencil, and when you lift the paper away, a 
clear drawing of the design will be left. Now in order to keep 
the design from rubbing out, take your India ink and perfect 
the design. As the India ink is mixed with water, it will fire 
out, but it will not rub out with the painting as oil and water 
do not mix. It can be wiped off however with alcohol to erase 
the tracing marks. A black outline may be used if preferred. 
Paint over these water color lines with a good black mineral 
paint, mixed with medium, but not as thin as for tinting; for 
this use a pointed sable liner that will make a clear line. If 
bands are necessary to connect the motifs, use a Hasburg's 
gauge with which the lines are easily put on. Practice in 
making lines is very essential and requires a steady hand. 
After the paint has been dried, wipe off very lightly with a 
damp cloth so that the water color will disappear, and you can 
see if your outlining is well applied, if not, retouch until you 
are satisfied with the work, this will be good practice. Have 
the china fired. When a small space is filled in with a color, 
use a point shader number five or six. 




WILD FLOWER STUDY— FLORENCE WYMAN WHITSON 






JL \*J 



REVISED BARGAI 

AT 75 CENTS PER DOZEN 

We offer until further notice the following studies with treatments all illustrated in Catalog "F" 



Catalogue F 
PAGE 

Elder Blossoms— Marshal Fry 

Wfld Carrots— M. M. Mason 21 

Peacock Study— F. H. Rhead 

Some Color Schemes and their Application— Hugo Froehlich. 24 

Scarlet Bean— Leta Horlocker .26 

Birds for Tile Decoration — Edith Alma Ross 26 

Poppies— T. McLennan 

Thistles— Mary A. Neal 

Poppies — M. M. Mason 

Apples— M.^M. Mason 

Oranges — M. M. Mason 

Iris — Laura Oyerly 

Phlox— Paul Putzki 33 

Plums — T. McLennan Hinman 34 

Marigolds— Laura B. Overly 

Zinnias— Mary Orerbeck 

Orchids^-P. Putzki 

Poppy and Hawthorn Blossoms— H. B. Paist 38 

Cyclamen— P. Putzki 



Sweet Peas— T. McLennan-Hinman.. 

Asters— T. McLennan-Hinman 

Anemone — A. Alsop-Robineav 
Mirror— Helen S. Williams 
Calla Lily— O.Foley.. 



Catalogue F 
PAGE 



Jack in the Pulpit— N. Beyer 

Hydrangea— M. M. Mason 

Texas Wild Flowers— A. Donaldson 

Hollyhocks— P. Putzki 

Narcissus — T. McLennan-Hinman .... 50 

Cotton— A. Donaldson 

Rose Panels— Mrs. H. B. Baker 

Petunias— Paul Putzki 53 

Passion Flo wer— Alice W. Donaldson 53 

Freesia— E. E. Daniels 

Azalea— Margaret D. Lindale .54 

Flowering Almond — E. E. Daniels .55 

Apple Blossoms— Alice W. Donaldson 55 

Larkspur — Edna S. Cave 56 



These will be sold postpaid at 75 cts. a dozen with treatments, until further notice. No order taken for less than one dozen. 
Choose your own assortment — The whole list sent free for two yearly subscriptions, one of which must be new. 
THIS PREMIUM OFFER GOOD UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO., SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



WE WILL SEND A SAMPLE COPY OF 

Till: POTTER 

to any Beginner, Studio Potter, Teacher, or anyone 

interested in pottery making of the past, 

present, or future. 

or interest in pottery, 
The Potter will come to you by return m 

Edited by FREDERICK HURTEN RHEAD. 

Published by THE POTTER PUBLISHING CO., 

Mission Canyon, Santa Barbara, California 

SUBSCRIPTION S3.00 a year, 35c a copy. Foreign 

The Potter is indorsed by Beginners, Professionals and 
men in the United States, Canada, England, Scotland, 1 
"Belgium, Denmark, Japan, China, The Philippine I 
Australia, and New Zealand. 



The COMPLETE SETS of 

The Sixteen Numbers of 

PALETTE and BENCH 

Are gone, but we have SETS of 15 at $3.00 

Every number except October, 1909. 



-POSTPAID TO ANY PART OF THE WORLD 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO., Syracuse, N. Y. 



THESE BOOKS SENT POST-PAID 
ON RECEIPT OF PRICE 

Mrs. Eilkin'B A. B. C. for Beginners in China Painting $1.00 

How to apply Enamels by Mabel C. Dibble 60 

Book on Methods for painting in Water Color by Gertrude Estabrook 1.00 

Colors and Coloring in China Painting 25 

Luna's Practical Pottery, 2 vote, (or rote, sold ringly $2.15 each) 4.00 

The Teacher of China Painting by D. M. Campant; 76 

Firing China and Glasa by Campana. 

Book of Monograms by Campana 

Books 2 and 3 "Decor:: . 

Color Painting," Designs by Campagna,.. 
''The Teacher of Oil Painting," Designs by Campa 
Flat Enamel Decoration in China by Mrs. L. T. Steward ... 

Home Furnishing by Alice M. Kellogg (Pub. at 1.50) 75 

..._ 2.00 
2.25 
.... 1.00 
5.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 



.42 

1.25 



The Human Figure by Vanderpool 

Marks of American Potters by E. A. Bar! 

American Glassware, Old and New 

Grand Feu Ceramics 

The Fruit Book 

The Rose BooL 

The Art of Teaching China Decoration, Class Room 

Flower Painting on Porcelain, Class Room No. 2 

Figure Painting on Porcelain and Firing, Class Room No. 3 3.00 

Conventional Decoration of Pottery and Porcelain, Class Room No. 4.. 3.00 

Book of Cups and Saucers 1.50 

Book of Little Things to Make... 

Keramic Decorations Nellie F. M; .1.00 

Eberlein & McClure'a "Practical B -.n Arts and 

Crafts," post paid, net 

' Handicrafts for the Handicapped" by Herbert. J. Hall and Mortice M. 

C Buck, post paid ... 1.35 

Pottery for Artists, Craftsmr-n and Teachers by Geo. J 
Design and the Decoration of Porcelain, by Henrietta Barclay Pah- 
Paper Cover $1.50 Cloth Cover S2.50 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 



When writing to advertisers please mention this magazine 



The entire contents of this Magazine are covered by the general copyright and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 



CONTENTS OF JULY, 1917 



Twenty-fifth Exhibit of the New York Society of Ceramic Arts 

Exhibition of the Keramic Society of Greater New York 

At the Sign of the Brash and Palette 

Bowl 

Marsh Marigold 

Borders for Service Plates 

Answers to Correspondents 

Porch Set 

Sugar and Creamer 

Lamp Vase, Color Study 



Karriette Horsfall 

Hazel N. Adler 

Anita Gray Chandler 

Maud M. Mason 

Henrietta Barclay Paist 

Mrs. Vernie Lockwood Williams 

Walter K. Titze 
May E. Reynolds 
Walter K. Titze 



Page 
39 
39, 42-50, 55 
40 
41 
51 
52 
52 
53 
54 
54 



REMITTANCES!!! 



We prefer Money-Order or New York Draft but if check 
is more convenient add the cost of Exchange which in N. Y. 
State is 10 cents.— KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO. 

THESE BOOKS SENT POST-PAID 
ON RECEIPT OF PRICE 

Mm. Filkin'i A. B. C. for Beginners in China Painting $1.00 

How to apply Eaamela by Mabel C. Dibble 50 

Book on Methods for painting in Water Color by Gertrude Estabrook 1.00 

Color* and Coloring in China Painting 25 

Lunn'a Practical Pottery, 2 vols, (or rola. sold singly $2.15 each) 4.00 

The Teacher of China Painting by D.M. Campana 79 

Firing China and Glass by Campana 37 

Book of Monograms by Campana .42 

Books 2 and 3 "Decorative Designs," by Campana, each S3 

'Water Color Painting," Designs by Campagna, 53 

"The Teacher of Oil Painting," Designs by Campana 53 

Flat Enamel Decoration in China by Mrs. L. T. Steward 1.25 

Home Furnishing by Alice M. Kellogg (Pub. at 1.50) 75 

The Human Figure by Vanderpool „ 2.00 

Marks of American Potters by E. A. Barber 2.25 

American Glassware, Old and New 1.00 

Grand Feu Ceramics 5.00 

The Fruit Book 3.00 

The Rose Book 3.00 

The Art of Teaching China Decoration, Class Room No. 1 3.00 

Flower Painting on Porcelain, Class Room No. 2 3.00 

Figure Painting on Porcelain and Firing, Class Room No. 3 3.00 

Conventional Decoration of Pottery and Porcelain, Class Room No. 4.. 3.00 

Book of Cups and Saucers 1.50 

Book of little Things to Make 2.00 

Keramic Decorations Nellie F. Mcintosh... 1.00 

Eberlein A McClure's "Practical Book of Early American Arts and 
Crafts," post paid, net 6.00 

"Handicrafts for the Handicapped" by Herbert J. Hall and Mertice M. 
C. Buck, post paic 1.35 

Pottery for Artists, Craftsmen and Teachers by Geo. J. Cox, 1.35 

Design and the Decoration of Porcelain, by Henrietta Barclay Paist 

Paper Cover $1.50 Cloth Cover $2.50 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 



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Keramic Studio ? 



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magazine, and then— get busy ! 



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for 

ART TEACHERS AND STUDENTS 

2 volumes with about one hundred illustrations 
$4.00 postpaid. 



These volumes sold separately for $2.15 each postpaid. 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO. 
SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



Rare Volumes of Keramic Studio Magazine ! 

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LAMP VASE— w. K. titze 



JULY 1917 
KERAMIC STUDIO 



KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 



Vol. XIX, No. 3. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



July 1917 



TWENTY-FIFTH EXHIBIT OF THE NEW YORK SOCIETY 
OF CERAMIC ARTS* 

Harriette Horsfall 

THE Twenty-fifth Exhibition of the New York Society of 
Ceramic Arts recently held at the Little Gallery, 15 
East Fortieth Street, New York City, was, t though small, 
the most distinguished of the many dignified exhibits of this 
Society. The exhibition, which was confined to members only 
comprised much that was notable from the studios of the 
overglaze decorators, and some delightful groups from well- 
known potters. Among the decorators the treatment of en- 
amels grows yearly more interesting. The designs tend to 
greater strength and dignity, giving to the decorations the 
beauty of color and form so pleasing in the work of Oriental 
craftsmen. 

Mrs. Cherry of St. Louis showed charming bowls and jars 
in enamels. A large bowl designed in medallions was of spe- 
cial note, also a small celadon tray decorated with a well- 
thought-out animal motif treated with feeling for form and 
color. As a whole the exhibit of this craftswoman was both 
artistic and pleasing. 

Miss Ivison's small pieces were of varying interest. Miss 
Armstrong had a tea set in red and gold, good in color and treat- 
ment. Mrs. A. B. Leonard's showing was small, displaying 
a tendency to limit effort to execution, rather than design, in 
her exquisite lustre group upon an oval tray. 

Other lustre pieces were the work of Mrs. B. P. Vander- 
hoof, the chairman of the Society, who is skilled in the use of 
this medium. A delightful coffee set in silver lustre, by Mrs. 
Vanderhoof , was shown on a black and silvered lacquered fold- 
ing table which could easily be moved to where coffee might 
be served. An attractive set of silver place plates designed by 
Miss Mason and executed by Mrs. Vanderhoof, were set upon 
a cloth of Chinese brocade on a table near the entrance of the 
Gallery, and formed a beautiful feature of the exhibition. In 
fact the settings for the various groups of china were charming 
and added greatly to the beauty of this distinguished exhibit. 
Miss Mason's delightful table arrangements were always in 
harmony with the color schemes of her decorations. A set of 
orange and green plates and comports rested upon an antique 
refectory table, spread with Italian runner and doilies in soft 
cream linen. Another brilliant group of black enamel, the dec- 
oration in a color scheme ranging from palest yellow to deepest 
orange and green was spread on an orange silk table covering. 
Another set of place plates bordered in a flower garden design 
of rose, green, blue and black enamel on creamy white ware 
was very charming on very thin and dainty linen. In the 
centre of the table was a beautiful greenish Venetian glass bowl 
containing two or three very delicate pink roses, and the ar- 
rangement was completed by a group of four silver candle- 
sticks containing very delicately tinted pink candles. 

In addition to these suggestions for artistic tableware, 
Miss Mason exhibited bowls and lamp vases in enamels charac- 
terized by her strong feeling for design and color. Mrs. Van- 
derhoof had also some interesting Belleek jars worked out in 
enamels, and a breakfast set in grey blues and pinks of charm- 

(Continued on page 54) 

*By an unfortunate oversight the account of this exhibit was omitted 
from the last issue of Keramic Studio in which illustrations were given. — Ed. 



EXHIBITION OF THE KERAMIC SOCIETY OF GREATER 
NEW YORK 

Hazel N. Adler 
"T^HE Keramic Society of Greater New York held its annual 
A exhibition at the Museum of Natural History in New 
York City from April 26th to May 6th. A feature of unusual 
interest was a case of bowls decorated with designs suggested 
by the collection of Peruvian Textiles in the Museum. This 
case occupied a prominent position in one of the main corri- 
dors at the entrance to the exhibition room. Each member 
of the society was supposed to contribute one and it was in- 
teresting to see the wide variety of interpretations. The bowls 
themselves were chosen to carry out the primitive idea and 
were simple in shape and texture, and their decoration was 
handled in a spontaneous but true and skillful manner. The 
Museum was very much pleased with the collection and re- 
viewed it minutely in their bulletin. A large plate by Mrs. 
O'Hara decorated with a Peruvian fish motif in gold received 
special commendation and was photographed by them for 
their own collection. 

The exhibition room was arranged to represent a garden 
with lattice work screens covered with greens separating the 
different tables. The tables, as last year, aimed not only to 
display the chinaware, but to assemble it with suitable linens 
and table decorations. The dominant note was one of re- 
freshing simplicity — the kind which is well thought out and 
carefully executed to show restraint and refinement. 

Mrs. O'Hara's three large tables showed three very dif- 
ferent purposes, both in the decoration of the tableware and 
in its assembling. One was set with peasant pottery decor- 
rated in a large simple bird motif in blue. The contributing 
colors were yellow, lavender and green. The tablecloth was 
Russian crash herringboned in dark blue. The tall, substan- 
tial candlesticks were decorated to match the plates, and the 
glasses were old fashioned blue lustre. A large Capri bowl 
filled with Japanese iris adorned the centre. This table was 
sturdy and almost frugal but the gayly decorated pottery lent 
it great vitality and interest. 

Her second table was finer textured, both literally and 
figuratively. The tableware was yellow Wedgwood decorated 
with prim and restrained sprigs of highly conventionalized 
flowers in green and violet. The tablecloth was fine yellow 
linen with an appliqued band of grey. A low dish in the 
centre held a brilliant array of imitation grapes in green, 
violet and orange. Two tall Venetian glass candy jars planked 
it on either side. While not a whit more elaborate than the 
peasant table, this table was pervaded by an atmosphere of 
refinement and grace. 

Mrs. O'Hara's third table displayed a tea set of highly 
lustred Japanese ware in mulberry decorated with a classic 
leaf design in dark blue. Dark blue linen circular doilies 
with fringed edges decorated the mahogany surface of the 
table and the center decorations were of Venetian glassware 
and pewter. 

Anna Fitch and Georgia Pierce Unger also displayed in- 
teresting cottage peasant tables. Both ladies painted their 
own tables with interesting motifs which were earned out in 
the glassware, china and linens. 

(Continued on page 44) 



40 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



ANITA GRAY CHANDLER 

7 Edison Avenue. Tufts College, Mass. 



Page Editor 




AT THE SIGN 

OF THE 
BRUSH AND PALETTE 

This is Ye Old Art Inn 
where the worker of Arts and 
Crafts may rest a bit and par- 
take of refreshment. 



SO many letters have come to the editor of this page asking- 
how to form clubs similar to the Art Lovers Club of Greater 
Boston that it has been decided to publish the constitution of 
the latter, so that those about to organize may be somewhat 
guided by the original club. It is suggested that the consti- 
tution be followed as closely as possible, since a federation of 
sister Art Lovers Clubs may be established at some future date. 

CONSTITUTION OF THE ART LOVERS CLUB 

Article I. Name — The name shall be The Art Lovers 
Club of Greater Boston. 

Article II. Purposes — The purpose of this club shall be: 
To obtain a better understanding of Art; to study good pictures, 
their stories, and their painters; to spread the Art Idea among 
others, especially young people and children, by means of pic- 
tures and stories. 

Article III. Meetings — Meetings shall be held on the 
second and fourth Thursdays of every month during the Club 
year, beginning the fourth Thursday in October and continuing 
for twelve meetings. These meetings are to be held for the 
present at the homes of the members, at three o'clock followed 
by a social hour with a simple tea furnished by the hostess. 

Article IV. Membership — Only those persons known to 
be lovers of Art, enthusiastic, congenial, and willing to work 
for the good of the Club and its purpose, will be considered for 
membership. A prospective member must be brought as a 
guest to one club meeting by a regular member who vouches 
for her desirability, before she may be voted upon by the club. 
There shall be twelve charter members. The total member- 
ship shall be limited to twenty-five the first year. 

Article V. Dues — The dues shall be one dollar per annum to 
charter members; two dollars to other members. A prospec- 
tive member becomes a regular member upon payment of dues. 

Article VI. Officers — The officers shall include a Presi- 
dent, a Vice-President, a Secretary, a Treasurer, and a Libra- 
rian. These officers shall be nominated from the floor and 
elected by popular vote. They shall serve one year. 

Article VII. The Program Committee — This committee 
shall consist of three suitable members to be chosen by the 
club to arrange the program for the year. Each member of 
the club will be asked to give her services in reference work, etc. 

For further information concerning the club, address 
Mrs. Chandler, 7 Edison Avenue, Tufts College, Mass. The 
answers will be published on this page in the next issue follow- 
ing receipt of letters. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

The passing of Bela Pratt has occasioned sorrowful regret 
among the lovers of modern sculpture all over America. Though 



living and working in Boston, Mr. Pratt has belonged to the 
whole country, and as a whole it mourns the quenching of his 
genius. F. Ogden Cornish, writing in the Transcript says, 
"Pratt, like his contemporaries, Cyrus Dallin and the Kitsons, 
really came into Boston as a missionary of the newer move- 
ment in sculpture that has completely outgrown the insipidities 
of the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries and that, in 
the person of Rodin, has attained heights of artistic achieve- 
ment unsurpassed since the days of Phidias". He was a pupil 
of Augustus Saint-Gaudens. One of his most beautifully 
modelled groups is the Light and Darkness, one of his World's 
Exposition works. 

•> •> »> 

John S. Sargent recently returned from the South where 
he painted the portrait of John D. Rockefeller for the modest 
consideration of $50,000, said to have been contributed later 
by the artist to one of the war relief funds. 

The Boston Museum of Fine Arts sponsored an exhibi- 
tion of childrens' work the last of May, in which drawings and 
paintings by little people from 10 to 14 created considerable 
interest. Much work that was genuinely artistic was shown. 
These children have been taught, not so much with a desire 
to make artists of them in the future, but to develop their 
appreciation of the beautiful. 



A^j&~~^- 



Note: — Mrs. Chandler is much alarmed that her term of office as presi- 
dent of the Art Lovers Club of Greater Boston extends from 1907 to the year 
0908, according to the June number of the Studio ! She feels that it is alto- 
gether too long. 



MAUD M. MASON ----- 

218 West 59th Street, New York City 



Page Editor 



HIGHER IDEALS 

THE study of design in the various keramic clubs cannot 
be too highly commended and encouraged as it means 
so very much in the development of our beautiful craft. 

The Atlan Club in Chicago constituted the enthusiastic 
group that commenced this work many years ago and then 
the New York Society of Ceramic Arts with Mr. Dow as their 
prophet, followed a similar course some fifteen years ago, 
since which time most of the other Ceramic Clubs have fallen 
in line. I am frequently delighted by letters from remote 
towns in regard to courses of study in design all showing a 
desire for help in this direction and for an understanding of 
the principles governing all creative work. "I wish to design 
my own pieces". — "I wish to be able to distinguish a good 
design from a poor one". — "Why is one type of work good and 
another bad", etc., etc., the expression of such desires 
may be heard from many directions and is indicative of higher 
ideals and a desire to do better work, and a recognition of the 
fact that a study of the principles of art and decoration is 
essential to good work. However, simple pattern making 
should not be the ultimate ambition of the student of design, 
but the beginning, and we must remember that it is the gen 
eral art training that affords a back-ground for really fine crea- 
tive work. 

Therefore let us not stop with the accomplishment of 
merely pleasing simple decorations, but let us go ahead and 
do more significant work in design, illustrative of some inter- 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



-d 



41 



esting thought or action or something of special moment. 
This seems to me to be the ultimate expression of the artist 
and something well worth while striving towards. 

COLOR SCHEME FOR BOWL 

r I ^HE bowl for which I have planned a simple design is a 
A Satsuma one to which the Mason soft enamels are ad- 
mirably adapted, the following colors working out an interest- 
ing scheme. 

Wherever black appears in the design use Black enamel. 
For the basket, bands at the top and under the border, lines 
of dots on lower part of the bowl, and one or two small leaves 
in the unit and band at the base of the bowl, use Lavender 
Blue enamel. For the large flower, use Madder Red and for 
the three small flowers, Light Carmine. Broad panels on 
base of bowl, Emerald Green. Leaves and encircling frame, 
equal parts of Florentine and Emerald Green enamel. 

FOR OUR INSPIRATION 

AS I have stated before my thought in having these photo- 
graphs reproduced was to present to our fellow craftsmen 
in our smaller towns and cities some of the best historic exam- 
ples of ceramic art found in museums, that it may assist them 
in forming a collection of reproductions of works of art for 
their study and inspiration. Get from them all that you can, 
they will help you in doing better work. 

The above is one of Delia Robbia's master pieces in the 
National Museum in Florence. The figures are white against 
the usual blue back-ground surrounded by the polychrome 
wreath, in yellows, blues and greens, — the scheme you always 
associate with Delia Robbia's works. 

No worker in ceramics has ever accomplished work com- 
parable with these master pieces. The sentiment, beauty 
and charm of the figures are most eloquent and need no comment. 







THE MADONNA AND CHILD— ANDREA DELLA ROBBIA 




BOWL— MAUD M. MASON 



42 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




PEASANT SET— GEORGIA PIERCE IjNGER 
Hand-made table. China decorated with enamels. Gray, green, dark blue and red. 




ALMA P. CRAFT ESTHER A. COSTER 

Peruvian motives in bowls, brilliant enamels 



CLARA WAKEMAN 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



43 




COFFEE SET, CRACKLE WARE— MRS. GEORGE DRAEGERT 

Black, Red, Yellow and Green Enamel decoration. 




PEASANT COTTAGE SET— ANNA E. FITCH 
Colors: Yellow, Orange and Blue. 



44 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



EXHIBITION OF THE KERAMIC SOCIETY OF 
GREATER NEW YORK 

(Continued from page 39) 

Mrs. Hatfield contributed an interesting tea table of her 
own design. It was oblong shaped, with a shelf underneath 
and had drop leaf sides which could be extended when in use. 
Upon this table, which was painted a silvery blue, she dis- 
played a charming blue tea set decorated in rose violet with 
linens to match and a set of amethyst water tumblers which 
she colored and decorated herself. A spotless white invalid 
tray with a peacock and violet striped cover and dainty white 
china decorated with a conventional design in blue green and 
violet was also exhibited by Mrs. Hatfield. 

Mrs. Lillian Smith's tea table laid with a pale yellow linen 
cloth and Belleek china decorated with an imaginative bird in 
red orange, blue green and violet was choice and dainty. For 
the center she chose a cracker and cheese dish with a slender 
single rose vase on one side. 

Mrs. Roth's coffee service in red, orange and black on 
creamy Belleek was distinctive and beautifully executed. Mrs. 
Coster displayed an interesting library table with tile book 
ends, lamp and flower bowls decorated in Chinese phoenix 
design. 

The exhibition was largely attended and a great deal of 
well directed curiosity was shown in the aims and ideals of the 
society. The society is composed of a group of professional 
women and is, in reality, a professional woman's club which 
meets and holds its exhibitions for mutual benefit. In con- 
nection with it, however, classes are provided which welcome 
the amateur as well as the professional. Mr. Marshal Fry 
has directed one of the classes for several years and this year 
Mrs. Weaver, of Cleveland, helped several smaller groups with 
their individual problems. The members are looking forward 
to an even more extended program of class and club work for 
next year. 




DESIGNED AND EXECUTED BY DOROTHEA "WARREN O'HARA 

Motive for design taken from the jib way Indian bead 
work. From photo loaned by courtesy of American Museum 
National History, New York. 




BOWL, COPPER LUSTER— DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 

The two vases have background of Orange Luster and decoration of Old Chinese Blue Enamel. From photograph loaned by 

courtesy of American Museum of Natural History, New York. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



45 




AFTER DINNER COFFEE AND CHEESE AND CRACKER SET— LILLIAN C. SMITH 

In Violet, Blue Green and Rhodian Red Enamels. Linens, soft yellow. 




TEA SET— LILLIAN C. SMITH 

Enamel decoration— Turquoise, Old Pink and Blue Violet 




DESIGNED AND EXECUTED BY DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 

Motives and designs taken from animal and bird drawings from the American Museum of Natural History, New York. 
Center bowl (animal design)'colors used: Canton Blue Enamel, hard; River Green 
Enamel, hard; Pomegranate Red Enamel, hard. 



46 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




BLUE WEDGWOOD PLATES— MRS. WEAVER 



Decorated in gray, red and green enamels. Linen, blue 
and gray. 



CAROLS M. BAKER 
Decoration carried out in brilliant soft enamels. 





CHINESE TEA SET— NINA HATFIELD 

In Violet Blue, Red Orange and Yellow Green enamels. 
Cloth dyed to match. 



GRAPE JUICE SET— ALMA P. KRAFT 

Decorated with Gypsy Pink enamel background. Design 
carried out with Old Chinese Blue and Lemon Yellow enamels. 





DINNER TABLE FOR COUNTRY HOUSE- 
DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 

China decorated with bird and flower designs. Enamels 
used were Raven Blue, Bright Sea Green, Old Yellow and 
Mauvine. Table cloth and napkins of gray Russian linen, 
needle work on cloth and napkins was done with dark blue 
linen floss. The glasses were lustered with dark blue luster. 



TEA SET OF YELLOW WEDGWOOD CHINA- 
DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 

Decorated in bands of Emerald Green enamel and a small 
sprig design. Flowers of the design were done with Wistaria 
enamel with Rhodian Red centers. Leaves and stems of sprig 
design, Emerald Green enamel. Cloth and napkins yellow 
linen with border of yellow gray linen. Cloth edged with 
button-hole stitch of Emerald Green floss flecked with Yellow 
and Coral floss. 




TEA SET— ANNA TARDY 



Japanese china decorated with butterfly motive. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



47 




MRS. GEORGE DRAEGERT MARGUERITE CAMERON JANET M. LAW 

Bowls with Peruvian motives decorated with brilliant enamels. 




INVALID SET— MARY E. HARRISON 
Decorated in Yellow and Violet Enamels. 




TWO ROSE JARS AND BOWL— MRS. ALVIN LIBBEY 
Decoration of brilliant soft enamels. 



48 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




BOWL— ANNA E. FITCH 
Decorated with Peruvian motives, green, black and red. 




BOWL— GEORGIA PIERCE UNGER 
Decorated with Peruvian motives, green, black and red. 




PLACE PLATE— JANET M. LAW 

Decorated with the Italian Pink enamel, Manchu Blue 
enamel, Green No. 1 and Violet enamel. 



CRACKLE WARE VASE— ESTELLE FREEMAN 
Decorated in brilliant soft enamels. 




PORCH SERVICE— NINA HATFIELD 

Blue china tea set in Violet, Blue Green and Old Chinese 
Pink enamels. Cloths — Russian linen with blue and pink 
edge. Napkins — Violet and blue linen. Glasses — Violet dec- 
orated with blue enamels. 




BOWL— NINA HATFIELD 

Decorated with Peruvian motive, Violet and Dark Blue 
enamels. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



49 




ELIZABETH MACKENZIE ROTH 



CORNELIA NELSON 



LILLIAN G SMITH 



Bowls decorated with Peruvian motives, blue, green and yellow. 




MRS. ALVIN LIBBEY 



CAROLYN M. BARKER ALICE L. DALLIMORE 

Bowls with Peruvian motives, decorated in enamels. 




DESIGNED AND EXECUTED BY DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 

Motives of designs taken from Indian seed work (Micmac, Iroquois and Ojibway tribes). Photographs loaned by courtesy of 

American Museum of Natural History, New York. 



50 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




TEA SET— CAROLYN M. BAKER 

Decorated with Canton Blue enamel and silver. Linens 
gray and blue. 



BREAKFAST SET— MRS. GEORGE DRAEGERT 
Belleek china decorated with Violet and Pink enamels. 




LUNCHEON SERVICE— ALICE DALLIMORE INDIVIDUAL BREAKFAST SET— NINA HATFIELD 

Yellow Wedgwood china decorated with green, blue and In Violet, Turquoise Blue and Pink enamels. Cloth, Tur- 
white enamels. quoise Blue. Napkins, blue violet linen. 




INDIVIDUAL TEA SET IN YELLOW WARE— MARGUERITE CAMERON 
Decorated with Violet, Green and White enamels. Soft 
yellow linen, tray cloth gray. White napkins. 




SATSUMA TEA SET— CLARA WAKEMAN 
Decorated in Persian Red and Blue Green enamels. 




LIBRARY TABLE— ESTHER A. COSTER 

Lusters and enamels Dark Blue, Rose, Gray, Light Green 
and Coral. Hand blocked runner. 



BOWL— ANNA TARDY 
Decorated with Peruvian motives. Black, red and gray 
enamels. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



51 



MRS. HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST - 

2298 Commonwealth Ave., St. Paul, Minn. 



Page Editor show some applications for those who are not yet able to "draw 
their own conclusions". 



MARSH MARIGOLD 

THIS lovely flower of the marshes is one of the earliest 
of the spring plants. Its lovely bright yellow cup like 
flower and decorative leaves, even the stems shading from 
pale green to a deep pink (Violet of Iron to the china decora- 
tor), furnish inspiration and decorative possibilities beyond 
the average plant. 

I have shown only simple drawings, suggestions for 
simplifications and conventionalizations, a hint for those 
who may not be able to gather the original. Next month will 



TWIN CITY KERAMIC CLUB 

The Twin City Keramic Club, of St. Paul and Minneapolis, 
at its annual election in May elected the following officers for 
the ensuing year: 

President — Mrs. Arch Coleman 
Vice-President — Miss Ora V. White 
Secretary— M. Etta Beede 
Treasurer — Florence E. Newman 
The Club has just closed a successful year and will not 
meet again until September. 




MARSH MARIGOLD— HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST 



52 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




MRS. VERNIE LOCKWOOD WILLIAMS - Page Editor 

University of Pittsburg. Home Studio, 52 W. Maiden St., Washington, Pa. 



BORDERS FOR SERVICE PLATES. 

NOW is the time of year when all students in design should 
make detail drawings of the spring flowers they may 
come in contact with. 

Make a naturalistic study in color — then analyze as to 
details making very accurate drawings. 

Mount these drawings on cardboard and file away for fu- 
ture reference — they will be found to be of inestimable value. 

The border designs for service plates were all made from 
the bellflower, a common spring flower of beautiful blue. 

The plates were all worked out in gold, no outlines being 
used. A monogram may be added as part of the design, 
repeating as many times as may be desired. 

* ¥• 

STUDIO NOTE 

Professor Franz J. Schwarz has recently moved his studio 
from Ridgeland Avenue, Oak Park, 111., to his new address 
5322 Washington Boulevard, Chicago. 

ANSWER TO CORRESPONDENT 

N. J. C. — In the May number you asked if we could assist you in find- 
ing a color study showing desert, pyramid and sphinx with camels, caravan, 
etc., in moonlight. Miss Nellie N. Mcintosh, 919 North Walnut Street, 
Danville, HI., will be glad to supply the study. 




KERAMIC STUDIO 



53 




WALTER K. TITZE - 

210 Fuller Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. 



Page Editor 



WALTER K. TITZE 



PORCH SET 

I USED a brilliant yellow Japanese ware. It can be pur- 
chased at any department store or Japanese shop. Ena- 
mels are used. 

First Working — Trace in carefully, especially so with the 
flower motive. All dark bands and background in back of 
flower medallion, are black enamel. I would suggest you out- 
line all in India ink before working. Flow white enamel over 
entire floral unit making one mass for flowers and leaves. Fire. 

Second Working — Grey bands are two parts Albert Yellow 
and two parts Satsuma, painted on. Clean off enamel. Paint 
floral spray over white enamel laid on first firing and when 
completed if you desire a black touch behind flower or leaf 
use black paint. 

Flowers are Albert Yellow shaded with Yellow Brown 
and Brown Green, leaves are Apple Green shaded with Yellow 
Green and Shading Green; a touch of Brown Green may be 
added. Forget-me-not forms are painted with violet color and 
shaded with same using heavier. 

If a tray is desired you can purchase a large reed tray at 
any sh p and paint it black using Sapoline (black) or any bath 
tub enamel adding black oil paint. This design must be 
worked up to be appreciated. Keep it simple. 

For the linen I would suggest plain white 
with a border of buttonhole stitching in a brilliant 
yellow with a touch of black. 




Mr. Titze is one of our promising young decorators, a pupil 
of Mrs. Kathryn E. Cherry and Mrs. Stoner. We are expect- 
ing interesting developments in his work. 



PORCH SET— WALTER K. TITZE 



54 

MAY E. REYNOLDS ------ 

1 16 Auditorium Building, Chicago, 111. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 

Page Editor 



SUGAR AND CREAMER 

May E. Reynolds 
ClRST Fire — Outline the design in outlining ink, paint in 
* Forget-me-nots in Banding Blue, Baby Blue, Deep Blue 
Green, a touch of American Beauty at the tips of the buds, 
also a little Crimson Purple; in the background use Banding 
Blue, Baby Blue, Violet of Iron, Copenhagen Grey, and a little 
Peacock Blue. Leaves in Apple Green, Moss Green, Brown 
Green, Grass Green. Stems in Finishing Brown and a little 
Best Black. Tint at base Violet, and a touch of Crimson 
Purple, and Best Black. Band at top and broad band at 
base are in Green Gold. 

Second Fire — Tint blocked part next to Forget-me-nots 
in Grey Glaze dusted on with Special Tinting Oil. Retouch 
Forget-me-nots in same colors used in first fire. Retouch 
narrow band at base and lay in gold for second fire. 

tr •? 

LAMP VASE (Color Study) 

Walter K. Titze 

DESIGN to be applied twice. Mrs. Cherry' enamels 
were used. Bud — All yellow tone is Canary Yellow. 
Orange tone, 1 part Orange No. 3 and 1 part Orange Red. 
Green wings, Grass Green. All red tone (head, circles of 
head feathers and tail), Pompeian Red. All blue lines, etc., 
Cadet Blue with touch of Black. 

Design in back of bird — Greens (light), 1 part Grass 
Green, 1 part Celtic Green. Greens (dark), use same mix- 
ture as for light leaves and add 1 part Cadet Blue. Yellows, 
Canary Yellow. Orange tone, Orange No. 3 (1 part) and 
Orange Red (1 part). Red tones (dots, etc.), Pompeian 
Red. Stems, same as light leaves. Background is Cadet 
Blue with touch of black. 

All outside of vase is black paint. I have found Cam- 
pana's Best Black to be the finest on the market for large 
spaces. It is black. 




LAMP— CAROLYN M. BAKER 

Old Chinese Blue background, Green No. 2 for leaves and 
Old Yellow for flowers. Basket shade. 

KERAMIC SOCIETY OF GREATER NEW YORK EXHIBIT 
EXHIBIT OF NEW YORK SOCIETY OF CERAMIC ARTS 

(Continued from page 39) 

ing simplicity. Mrs. G. P. Unger showed a tea set of simple 
motif in dainty coloring. 

The work of Messrs. Suffolk and Ott, newcomers in ex- 
hibitions of this Society evidenced an Oriental influence. Their 
decorations are in metallic effects, being rich in tone and color 
obtained by the use of lustres and color over gold. 

The background designs show an interesting tracery of 




SUGAR AND CREAMER— MAY E. REYNOLDS 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



55 



gold meandering through the main color schemes. Of the 
several examples exhibited the most striking are a tall vase in 
blue and a small square jar in red. 

The potters were also well represented. The Misses Pen- 
man and Hardenbergh showed especially fine pieces in the new 
blue gloss glaze, which is rich in color and quality. These 
potters every year show an enlargement in the scope of their 
work and an added fineness in color and form, with a conse- 
quent appreciation by collectors. Their pieces include flower 
vases, lamp vases, lily bowls and other things which are both 
useful and decorative in themselves. 

Mrs. G. Boardman Tyler is a new potter in the field and 
while some of her glazes lack the quality that she will be able 
to get with more experience, she had some delightful forms 
and glazes. A small turquoise bowl and a small vase in similar 
color were especially charming. 

The Newcomb College Pottery was well represented with 
quite a large group of their very individual and satisfactory 
pieces. Their main thought seemed directed toward vases 
and jars for holding flowers and in many instances these were 
also decorated in flower forms, all of which were very charm- 
ing in their beautiful greys, blues and yellows. 

The Bowl Shop showed many interesting things and 
differ from other potteries in exhibiting pieces suitable for use 
upon the table. A delightful set in a warm yellow opaque 
glaze gave a very telling variety, and was a good foil for their 
interesting blue and grey bowls. 

It is the wish of this Society to gather into its ranks those 
who have "arrived" and who are doing thoroughly professional 
work both in the making of pottery and those who are deco- 
rating porcelains. A strong group of this kind representing 
different sections of the country can do much towards estab- 
lishing artistic standards. 



Walsh's Universal Bander 




'u'This is a patented device for banding and lining pottery, glass and 

metal objects with either regular or irregular edge. 

Hit is thoroughly practical. 

Hit is easy to operate, requiring very little practice. 

IfYou can use with this Bander a brush, pen or pencil. 

IT SAVES TIME AND LABOR 

Hit is simple in construction— nothing to get out of order. 

Hit replaces with entire satisfaction the high priced and difficult to 

operate Banding Wheels. 

HEvery china and glass decorator needs this Bander. 

HWrite for descriptive matter. 



B. F. DRAKENFELD & CO., Inc., Agents 
Main Office 50 Murray Street, New York City 



D. M. CAMPANA ART CO. 



Inc. 



MONOGRAM BOOK 40c 

THE TEACHER OF OIL PAINTING 

BOOK 50c 

THE TEACHER OF WATER COLOR 

PAINTING BOOK 50c 

THE TEACHER OF DRAWING FIG- m 

r- URES FROM NATURE 75c 

THE TEACHER OF CONVEN- 

* TIONAL DECORATING BOOK..90c 

LUSTRE BOOK 45c 

FIRING BOOK 30c 

THREE DECORATIVE DESIGN 

Books 1, 2, 3. 535 Orig. Designs....$2.10 

THE LEATHER CRAFT BOOK 40c 

FLEXIBLE RULES1I8 INCH 30c 

GOLD REMOVER; NON-ACID 25c 

CAMPANA'S KILN -MENDING 

MOIST CLAY, PER CAN 30c 

ONE FIRING INK, FIRES BLACK 

PeriBottle 20c 

NOTICE OUR 



OPEN-INE, the new>ater>olor medium 
, made to keep colors open." Finest thing. 

Per Bottle 25c 

COVERED PALETTE, 8x10 57c 

FINE ROSE STUDY, 9x15 25c 

FINE GRAPE STUDY; 9x15 25c 

LIQUID ERASER, for fired colors. ...45c 
CAMPANA'S DILUTING MEDIUM 

FOR OUTLINING 25c 

OPAL LUSTRE, FINEST 16c 

BEST MOTHER PEARL 20c 

STERLING ROMAN SILVER 

VERY SMOOTH, Per Box 35c 

CAMPANA'S PURITY GOLD 

THIS MONTH, PER BOX 48c 

Campana's catalog contains thousands of 
other specialties. Colors in vials and bulk. 
Golds in bulk. Moderate price goods abso- 
lutely guaranteed. 
NEW ADDRESS 



323 SOUTH WABASH AVENUE, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



can supply everything 
for the 



ABBOTT 
CHINA PAINTER and ARTIST. 

Send for New Illustrated Catalog of Art Material. 
A. H. ABBOTT & CO. 

General Offices and Wholesale Dept. 208-210-212 South Wabash Ave., 

Retail Store 19 North Wabash Avenue 
CHICAGO, ILL. 



Copy for advertisements for August number should be in by 

JULY 1st. 

Keramic Studio Publishing Co. 



We have purchased several large 

"Stocks'W White China 

in this country, and with what 

China We Had of Our Own 

will give us a fairly good, but not 
complete stock for this fall. 



We expect to get out a 

Completely Revised Catalogue 

to be mailed in August. 
If you don't receive it send for one. 

W. A. MAURER, Council Bluffs, la. 

MFG. KLONDIKE GOLD— AGT. LIMOGE'S COLORS 
AGT. REVELATION KILNS 



VI 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



The Art Institute of Chicago— 

N. H. Carpenter, Secretary and Director, pro tern. 

School of Drawing, Painting, Sculpture, Illustrating, 
Designing, Normal Instruction, 

Ceramic Design and Decoration 

Send for Catalogue Department K, Chicago, 111. 

Miss Jessie M. Bard 

INSTRUCTOR IN 

Design, Jewelry, Leather Work and China Decoration 

The Williamsport-Dickinson Seminary, Williamsport, Pa. 

Blanche Van Court Boudinot 

HOME STUDIO 1316 ALBION AVE., CHICAGO, ILL. 
Special designs in naturalistic, conventional, semi-conventional 
and enamel work, made to vour order on china or in water colors. 
STUDIES FOR SALE AND RENT 

SCHNEIDERS CHINA AND LEATHER COLORS 
FOR SALE 

Telephone Rogers Park 6185 

Mrs. K. E. Cherry 

DESIGNS TO ORDER 



MARINA BUILDING, STUDIO 1, 2. 



ST. LOUIS, MO. 



Jessie Louise Clapp 

TEACHER OF CHINA DECORATION 

IN THE USE OF "COOVER'S OUTLINE DESIGNS" AND 

K. E. CHERRY'S COLORS AND ENAMELS, ETC. 

Sphinx Gold, Roman-Unfluxed, White, Green, 

67 cents per box post-paid. 
INSTRUCTION BY MAIL IF DESIRED. 

516 McCarthy Building, SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



THIS SPACE together with name and address 
in "The Directory" $3.00 Per Month 

A YEAR'S CONTRACT CARRIES WITH IT A YEAR'S 

SUBSCRIPTION TO THIS MAGAZINE. 

Discount on yearly contracts 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 

Miss Mabel C. Dibble 

STUDIO— 806 Marshall Field Building 

110 N. Wabash Avenue, Chicago. 

Teacher of Conventional Enamel Work on Po . elain. 

Water color designs for rent. Catalogue. 

Send for price list of my enamels. Full size vials. 

Prepared and bottled in my studio. 

Enamels sold as mine at 10c, small vial, are imitations. 

Booklet on Enamel Work 50c. 

Edna Louise Einbigler 

600 WEST 113 STREET, NEW YORK. 

Instructor in China Decoration, Conven- 
tional and Naturalistic, Enamels. 

Telephone Morningside 7686. 

Jetta Ehlers 

STUDIO 18 EAST KINNEY ST, NEWARK, N. J. 

PORCELAIN DECORATION AND DESIGN 

PLANS FOR TABLE LINENS 

Linens and materials for working purchased on commission. 

Miss Gertrude Estabrooks 

Water Color Pictures to Rent — Heads, Flowers, Land- 
scapes and Fruit. Send for Catalogue. 
Book on Methods and Colors, in Water Colors. Price SI. 

Lessons in W T ater Color, Oil and Tapestry. 
17 N. State St., Stevens Bldg, Room 1505, Chicago, 111. 

Mrs. A. A. Frazee 

STUDIO 919 FINE ARTS BUILDING 

410 Michigan Boulevard, South, Chicago 
Teacher of Conventional Design and Enamel Work on Porcelain 
Send for my Tested, Hard and Satsuma Enamel. 

Original Designs for Conventional Work made to Order. 

Importer of Royal Satsuma for Decorating 



Teachers' Directory 



California 

LOS ANGELES 

Chapman-Bailev Studio, 416-417 Bla 
chard Building, 233 S. Broadway 



District of Columbia 

WASHINGTON 

Sherratt Art Studio, 608 13th St. N. W. 

Illinois 

CHICAGO 

D. M. Campana Art School, 323-325 S. 
Wabash Ave. 

Miss Mabel C. Dibble, Studio S06 Mar- 
shall Field Building 

Mrs. A. A. Frazee, 918 Fine Arts Bldg., 
410 Michigan Boulevard, So. 

Blanche Van Court Boudinot, 5315 
Kenmore Avenue 

Gertrude Estabrooks, Room 1505, 17 
N. State St., Stevens Building 

The Art Institute of Chicago, Dept K. 

lone Libby Wheeler, 1020 Fine Arts 
Building, 410 Michigan Boulevard. 

Prof. Franz J. Schwarz, 5322 Wash- 
ington Boulevard. 

St. Louis School of Fine Arts. Washing. 
ton University, Skinker Road and 
Linden Boulevard. 



DAVENPORT 

Miss Edith Aln 
DES MOINES 



SHREVEPORT 



Ross, 312 E. 14 th St. 



Mrs. Anna C. Tarrant, 1165 Louisi 

Avenue 

Maine 

BOOTHBAY HARBOR 

Commonwealth Art Colony. 



Missouri 

ST. LOUIS 

Mrs. K. E. Cherry, M 
Grand and Lindell A 



Minnesota 

ST. PAUL 

Henrietta Barclay Paist, 2298 Corn- 



New Jersey 

NEWARK 

Mrs. F. N. Waterfield, 149 Washington 

Street 
Miss Charlotte Kroll, 149 Washington 

Street 



Ne 



York 

, 609 Ma 



600 West 113 



BUFFALO 

Mrs. C. C. Filki 
NEW YORK 

Edna Louise Embiglf 

Street 
M 

Ave _ 

Miss M. M. Mason, 218 West 59th St. 
Rhoda Holmes Nicholls, 39 W. 67th St. 
Mrs. L. Vance-Phillips, 13 Central Park 

West 
Miss Fannie M. Scammell, 244 West 

104th Street 
Lillie M. Weaver, 159 W. 125th St., 

(cor. 7th Ave.) 

SYRACUSE 

Miss Jessie Louise Clapp, McCarthy 
Block, corner South Salina and Onon- 
daga Streets. 

Ohio 

COLUMBUS 

Miss Mint M. Hood, 1092 E. Rich St. 



PHILADELPHIA 

A. B. Cobden 13 South 16th St. 

Tennessee 

CHATTANOOGA 

Mrs. B. B. Crandall, 220 E. Terrace 



MILWAUKEE 
Anna E. Here 
194 11th St. 



nd Adele P. Cha 



Mrs. F. N. Waterfield 
Miss Charlotte Kroll 

DOMESTIC ART ROOMS, 149 Washington St.. Newark, N. J. 

Importers and Dealers in China for Decorating 

PAINTS. MEDIUMS, ETC. CHINA FIRED DAILY 

Agents for Perfection Kilns 

Send for our "Rose," stands repeated firings, 25c per vial 



Miss M. M. Mason 

218 West 59th St., New York 



THE PRINCIPLES OF DESIGN— « il h studic 

for teachers, craftsmen and designers. 



CERAMICS— the 
— modeling i 
forms. 
Catalogue of designs upon request 



of colors, enamels, and lustres 
lay — the building of potten 



Rhoda Holmes Nicholls 

CLASSES I N WA TER COLORS A ND OILS 

Colonial Studios, 39 W. 67th St., New York City 
Henrietta Barclay Paist 

A Non-resident Course of Design for the China Decoralor. 

Simple and practical. 

This course was the outcome of a demand for help in this direction 

and has been in practice since 1910. 

The advantages are obvious. You can put yourself 

in the Creative Class. W r rite for particulars. 

Special arrangements for Clubs or groups of four 01 more. 

2298 Commonwealth Avenue, ST. PAUL, MINN. 

Emily F. Peacock 

104 South Street, Freehold, N. J. 
DEALER IN UNUSUAL ANTIQUES 
Miss Edith Alma Ross 

New Studies in Water Color for Rent 

New designs for china decoration, naturalistic and conventional 

New water color studies for landscape and flower painting. 

New designs for china arranged in sets. 

Studies sent on approval upon receipt of reference. 

For price-list Address 312 E. Fourteenth St., Davenport, Iowa. 

Special designs made to order. 

WANTED ! 
Copies of Palette and Bench for October 1909. 
Quote price. 
Address, 

Keramic Studio Publishing Co., 

Syracuse, N. Y. 



Prof. Franz J. Schwarz 

Begs to announce the removal of his studio for instruc- 
tion in Figure and Miniature. Painting on Porcelain and 
Ivory, also Conventional Work, from 

126 South Ridgeland Ave, Oak Park, Ills., 

to his new address 

5322 Washington Boulevard, CHICAGO, ILLS. 



J. Blair Suffolk 

Classes in the modern decoration of porcelain and glass. 

The Old Persian method of decorating porcelain over the glaze. 

Enamels, Colors, Lustres, Metals, Water Color, 
Japanese Wood Blocks. 

9 West 64h St., New York 93 Rue de Vaugirard. Paris 

Mrs. Anna C. Tarrant 

1165 Louisiana Avenue, SHREVEPORT, LA. 

TEACHER OF CHINA DECORATION 

OUT OF TOWN STUDENTS, 

write for terms and particulars. 

CHINA FIRED DAILY. MATERIALS. 

Mrs. Ada Murray Travis Jf 8 f^ niDg8ide 

Studio Florentine Court 186 Wtst lt9th St., New York City 

TO OUT OF TOWN TEACHERS 
I have one of the largest collections of New and Original 
Designs for Enamel in Water Colors either for sale or rent. 



Designs sent an approval 
3 large assortment of Conventional and Naturalistic. 



Whert writing to advertisers please mention this magazine 




TO 



SUBSCRIBERS 



ONLY 




A REMARKABLE BOOK OFFER! 

Subject to change without notice ! 
50 per cent Discount on the Following 

Regular Price. 

Class Room No. 1 . Art of Teaching, etc., $3.00 

" No. 2. Flower Painting, etc., 3.00 

" No. 3. Figure Painting, etc., 3.00 

" " No. 4. Conventional Decoration, etc. 3.00 

Little Things to Make, 2StSJtST553 , &nS 2.00 

Book of Cups and Saucers, 1 .50 

THIS IS AN OPPORTUNITY 
OPEN TO ALL SUBSCRIBERS OF KERAMIC STUDIO. 



K ERA MIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO. 



m& x 






These Combination Prices 

will continue until further notice 

Keramic Studio Books 

EACH COMPLETE IN ONE VOLUME: POSTPAID 

Grand Feu Ceramics .. ...$ 5.00 

The Fruit Book 3.00 

The Rose Book 3.00 
The Art of Teaching China Decoration, Class Room 

No. 1 3.00 

Flower Painting on Porcelain, Class Room No. 2 3.00 

Figure Painting on Porcelain and Firing, Class 

Room No. 3... 3.00 

Conventional Decoration of Pottery and Porcelain, 

Class Room No. 4 3.00 

Book of Cups and Saucers 1.50 

Book of Little Things to Make 2.00 

Design and The Decoration of Porcelain, Paper 1.50 

Cloth.. 2.50 

SPECIAL COMBINATION PRICES 

One Book and Subscription to Keramic Studio 6.50 

Two Books and Subscription to Keramic Studio 9.00 

Three Books and Subscription to Keramic Studio 1 1.00 

Four Books and Subscription to Keramic Studio 13.50 

Two Books ordered together 5.50 

Three Books ordered together 8.00 

Four Books ordered together 10.00 

Seven Books ordered together. .. 17.50 

Above offer refers to books listed at $3.00 to $5.00 
Nine Books Complete and 1 years' subscription 

to Keramic Studio ....... 21.00 

Book of Cups and Saucers and year's subscription 5,00 
Design and the Decoration of Pottery by H. B. Paist 

(paper cover) andyear's sub. to Keramic Studio 5.00 
Little Things to Make and year's subscription to 

Keramic Studio 
12 Nos. Palette & Bench Oct. '08 to Sept. '09 

and a year's subscription to Keramic Studio . . 5.50 



A VALUABLE AND INSTRUCTIVE BOOK IS 

Design and The Decoration of Porcelain 

By Henrietta Barclay Paist 

from her articles published in "Keramic Studio" 

Paper Cover $1 .50 post paid. Cloth Cover $2.50 post paid. 

Send card for information and prospectus. 

Liberal discount to Dealers 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO. Syracuse N. Y. 



The entire contents of this Magazine are covered by the general copyright and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 



CONTENTS OF AUGUST, J9J7 



Editorial 

My Country's Flower — A Plea for a National Emblem 

At the Sign of the Brash and Palette 

Newark Society of Keramic Arts 

Tiles for Window Box to be Done in Enamels 

The Linen Page 

Tea Set, Marsh Marigold Motif 

Flower Medallions 

Bird Design for Tile 

Answers to Correspondents 

Various Shapes Table Glass for Decoration 

Border Design, Fish Motif 

Short Cake Set, Strawberry Flower 

Cap and Saacer 

Beginner's Corner 

Breakfast Set 

Pansy Plate 



Allena Morgan Jones 
Anita Gray Chandler 
Sara McCampbell 
Kathryn E. Cherry 
Jetta Ehlers 
Henrietta Barclay Paist 
Adeline More 
Maad M. Mason 



Mrs. Vernie Lockwood Williams 

Albert W. Heckman 

Elise W. Tally 

Jessie M. Bard 

Lola St. John 

May E. Reynolds 



Page 

57 
57 
58 
59, 60, 64 
61 
62 
63 
65 
66 
67 
67 
68 
69 
70 
70 
71 
72 



THESE BOOKS SENT POST-PAID 
ON RECEIPT OF PRICE 

Mrs. Filkin'a A. B. C. for Beginners in China Painting $1.00 

How to apply Enamels by Mabel C. Dibble 50 

Book on Methods for painting in Water Color by Gertrude Estabrook 1.00 

Colors and Coloring in China Painting „ .25 

Lunn's Practical Pottery, 2 vols, (or rols. sold singly $2.15 each) 4.00 

The Teacher of China Painting by D. M. Campana,.... 79 

Firing China and Glass by Campana — _ 87 

Book of Monograms by Campana.... _ 42 

Books 2 and 3 "Decorative Designs," by Campana, each .83 

'Water Color Painting," Designs by Campagna, 53 

'The Teacher of Oil Painting," Designs by Campana 53 

Flat Enamel Decoration in China by Mrs. L. T. Steward „ 1.25 

Home Furnishing by Alice M, Kellogg (Pub. at 1.60) 75 

The Human Figure by Vanderpool „ 2.00 

Marks of American Potters by E. A. Barber 2.25 

American Glassware, Old and New 1.00 

Grand Feu Ceramics.... 6.00 

The Fruit Book 3.00 

The Rose Book 3.00 

The Art of Teaching China Decoration, Class Room No. 1 3.00 

Flower Painting on Porcelain, Class Room No. 2 3.00 

Figure Painting on Porcelain and Firing, Class Room No. 3 3.00 

Conventional Decoration of Pottery and Porcelain, Class Room No. 4.. 3.00 

Book of Cups and Saucers... 1.60 

Book of Little Things to Make 2.00 

Keramic Decorations Nellie F. Mcintosh 1.00 

Eberlein & McClure's "Practical Book of Early American Arts and 

Crafts," post paid, net 6.00 

"Handicrafts for the Handicapped" by Herbert J. Hall and Mertice M. 
C. Buck, post paid 1-35 

Pottery for Artists, Craftsmen and Teachers by Geo. J. Cox, 1.35 

Design and the Decoration of Porcelain, by Henrietta Barclay Paist 

Paper Cover $1.60 Cloth Cover $2.50 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 



|*» REMITTANCES!!! 



We prefer Money-Order or New York Draft but if check 
is more convenient add the cost of Exchange which in N. Y. 
State Is JO cents.— KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO. 



LUNN'S PRACTICAL POTTERY 

for 

ART TEACHERS AND STUDENTS 

2 volumes with about one hundred illustrations » 
$4.00 postpaid. 



These volumes sold separately for $2.15 each postpaid. 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO. 
SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



Rare Volumes of Keramic Studio Magazine ! 

Volume 9 Loose numbers complete 
2 sets only $3.50 each 

Volume 12 Loose numbers complete 
2 sets only $4.00 each 

VERY RARE! 

Volumes 1, 3 and 4 Loose numbers complete 

1 set each $3.50 each 

BOUND VOLUMES $5.00 EACH! 

In volumes 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 

Express or postpaid 

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When writing to advertisers please mention this magazine 




AUGUST 1917 
KERAMIC SUTDIO 



FRUIT PLATE— may b. hoelscher 
BUTTERFLY DESIGN-m. janie launt 



KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 



Vol. XIX, No. 4. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



August 1917 




IS we .had announced some time ago 
there is a new ware on the market 
which will be in the hands of all 
dealers by September, which is an 
I American ware, of good shapes, and 
retailing at very reasonable prices. 
It is made by the Haeger Pottery of 
Dundee, 111. and can be supplied in 
unlimited quantities, war or no war. 
1 It is of course an ornamental earth- 
enware, not a porcelain tableware. It reminds one of the 
Satsuma pottery, but is not creased and has a stronger and 
interesting yellow glaze. The same ware may be obtained 
with a green glaze, but the yellow will undoubtedly be the most 
in demand. It is most suitable for enamel decoration, like 
Satsuma, and much cheaper. 

No American porcelain so far to take the place of the 
European supply which is dwindling more and more. Very 
large orders for imported china have been placed by dealers 
to be filled as soon as the war is over and a big supply of German 
china will be released as soon as there is freight to carry it. 
Meanwhile the only thing for china decorators to do is to turn 
their attention to the decoration of potteries and glass. 

Some are trying again American porcelain which would 
give good satisfaction if properly burned, that is with a firing 
lasting three hours or more instead of the rush firing done by the 
average decorator. There is no reason why this porcelain 
could not be used to advantage, if the manufacturers, who have 
more orders for their decorated tableware than they can fill, 
can be persuaded to sell their china in white. The black spots 
which have given trouble to decorators when they first tried 
American china are due to too fast firing. This china has a 
lead glaze and the oils used to apply the colors have a tendency 
to burn in the glaze if burnt too fast, thus causing black spots t 
American china manufacturers have no trouble with black 
spots because they fire slowly. Decorators can learn to do 
the same. 



The interest in glass is growing. Many dealers are al- 
ready taking a stock of glass. By next fall we expect to see 
practically all dealers in china adding a line of glass to their 
china. We publish in this issue two illustrations of a few glass 
shapes on the market. As we said before we will be glad to 
have contributors submit designs for glass decoration with 
treatment in glass colors. But any old file of Keramic Studio 
will furnish abundance of glass designs, as simple china designs 
are also suitable for glass. Glass should not be overdecorated. 
The simplest decoration, as a rule, will be the most effective. 
The firing of glass is simply a matter of a little practice. Glass- 
ware decorated in a truly artistic way will sell easily. In fact 
several decorators who have just tried this work and are only 
beginners in it, write to us that they have no trouble in selling 
it well. 

The important point is to know what kind of glass you buy. 
Different glasses will need different firings. Many decorators 
have been disappointed because their first fired glass 
collapsed in the kiln. Once you know how to fire certain makes 
of glass, always be sure that you get glass from the same manu- 



facturer and, if you try a new make, experiment with it before 
risking a whole kiln of decorated glass. 

» H 

Mrs. O'Hara calls our attention to some inaccurate state- 
ments in a notice on her work, innocently quoted by Mrs. 
Anita Gray Chandler, in our June number, from an article in 
the Art World. Mrs. O'Hara was not born until after the 
Centennial in Philadelphia. The writer of the article con- 
fused the Centennial with the Chicago World's Fair. Further- 
more Mrs. O'Hara never taught in Montana and has only been 
in that State once in her life. 

H » 

We hear with regret that the excellent little Magazine, 
the "School Arts Book" went under with debts of approxi- 
mately $25,000. Many other publications may have the same 
fate, as the war has hit publishers badly, especially Magazines 
with a limited circulation in special fields. Keramic Studio is 
facing the storm bravely and successfully. It has absolutely 
no debts, but the publishers and editors cannot afford to buy 
Liberty Bonds or anything else out of their profits, as there are 
none. We hope for the best, we think the war will be over 
sooner than many people think, probably some time this fall 
and after the war there ought to be a big revival of the china 
business. Meanwhile we ask our friends to do all they can to 
push the subscription list and we ask advertisers to support 
us, even if they do not expect big immediate returns. It is the 
interest of all, for the best way to help a revival after the war 
is to keep Keramic Studio alive. 

MY COUNTRY'S FLOWER 



A Plea for a National Floral Emblem 

(Extracts from The Ladies' Home Journal) 

Allena Morgan Jones 

THERE is one of our flowers that is peculiarly adapted to our 
requirements for a national emblem. Loved and admired 
by all; a beautiful, free-growing, native wild flower, blooming 
in red, in white and in blue, as well as in an infinite variety of 
other shades and colorings. In woodland and on lofty moun- 
tain we find her springing straight and slender in a very elegance 
of endeavor; friendly with her gayly nodding, saucy flower- 
bells; brilliant with her scarlets and blues and golden linings; 
daring in her quest of the most hazardous ledge on which to 
poise her dainty frame; growing most beautiful in the wild 
open places, but lending herself gracefully and cheerfully to 
adorn the cottage as well as the elaborate work of the landscape 
gardener. Provident, she lays by stores; charitable, she dis- 
penses these; joyous, she disperses gloom. Her every grace 
is emblematic; her character is inspiring. 

She was first given the Latin name aquilegia — from aquila, 
meaning an eagle — by Linnaeus, as, to his imagination, the 
base of her petals suggested an eagle's talons. When Doctor 
Prior gave her an English name he called her columbine — from 
columba, meaning dove — because her petals suggested to him 
doves around a dish feeding — -a favorite design of early artists. 
Columbia, our poetic name, is not from the same derivation, 
but the eagle and the dove are our emblems of power and peace. 

{Continued on page 73) 



58 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



ANITA GRAY CHANDLER 

7 Edison Avenue. Tufts College, Mass. 



Page Editor 




AT THE SIGN 

OF THE 
BRUSH AND PALETTE 

This is Ye Old Art Inn 
where the worker of Arts and 
Crafts may rest a bit and par- 
take of refreshment. 



AUGUST seems to be the month for American women to 
close their homes and sojourn to some other part of the 
map than that particular spot where they have spent the 
preceding months. Some find relaxation in quiet country 
places by lakes or shore; others are attracted by the lure of 
larger cities than their own. New York, Chicago, Boston, 
Cleveland, Washington, each has its share of summer tourists 
eager to gather a store of information, impression and pleasure 
for the coming winter. Shops, parks, concert-halls, theatres, 
art-galleries and museums all contribute something to the 
whole. No doubt hundreds of Keramic readers will visit 
the larger cities this summer. Don't forget to drop into the 
art galleries and museums when you go. See as many pro- 
fessional exhibitions as you can crowd in between shopping 
trips and the movies. Your own work cannot fail to improve 
as a result. You will go home refreshed, your mind full of 
new ideas, and your fingers eager to take up the brushes again. 

A fascinating collection of textiles, pottery, glass, and 
silver from Mexico is being shown by the Boston Museum of 
Fine Arts through the summer months. It is lent by Mr. and 
Mrs. Eman L. Beck, long resident in the City of Mexico. 

The Cleveland Museum of Art successfully ended its 
first year on June 7. Mr. Frederick Allen Whiting, the di- 
rector, was formerly secretary of the Boston Society of Arts 
and Crafts. Since the opening of the museum, according to 
the official report, objects of art and money gifts to the value 
of $2,500,000 have been gratefully received. During the 
year it has been visited by 376,459 persons, averaging 1,032 
on week days and 4,333 on Sundays. Needless to say, this 
is an excellent record which does not require the usual modi- 
fication in such cases, "for a new museum." 

In the thirty-eighth annual report of the Chicago Art 
Institute acknowledgement is made of the following gifts: 
the Bryan Lathrop collection of Whistler etchings and litho- 
graphs, about 400 in all; the Alexander A. McKay bequest of 
$100,000, the income for purchase of paintings; and Mr. and 
Mrs. Frank G. Logan's gift of $50,000, the income for prizes 
at Art Institute exhibitions. 

♦ ♦ ♦> 

The American Association of Museums met on May 21 
and 23, in the American Museum of Natural History, and on 
May 22 at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, in New York 
City. One session of the meetings was mainly devoted to 



reports on the ever increasing effort to utilize museum objects 
for the instruction of children in the history of civilization. 
These reports showed a vigorous extension of the work in 
New England and New York Another session resolved itself 
into a discussion of the best methods of display in art museums. 
Still another took up the close connection of the museum and 
the artist, also of the museum and the art dealer. It was voted 
to issue during the coming year a small monthly publication 
called The Museum News Letter, devoted to the interests of 
all American Museums. The general editor is Mr. Harold 
L. Madison, Curator of the Park Museum of Providence. 
The art editor is Miss Margaret T. Jackson. 



Miss Marie Lehr has been appointed Curator of Prints in 
the Minneapolis Museum of Art. Miss Lehr, formerly Assist- 
ant in the Print Department of the Boston Museum of Fine 
Arts was given a year's leave of absence last October in order 
to organize a Print Department at the Minneapolis Museum. 




Tomita Pottery. 1850. Height 8>2 inches. Fine fawn-colored clay, very 
light glaze. Overglaze decoration vigorously drawn in blue, purple and 
green. Cover perforated in flower pattern. 

(Courtesy of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts.) 



The graceful Japanese jar of Tomita pottery pictured 
this month, is very appropriate to the season. It is nothing 
more nor less than a mosquito-smoker! The Oriental beauti- 
fies his humblest pursuits. This jar is not a very early speci- 
men, having been made about 1850, but is singularly beautiful 
as to line and decoration. The origin of the pottery at Tomita 
is unknown. However we know that it was abandoned in 1780 
and re-established nearly fifty years later. The mark Tomita 
is very rare. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



59 



AN APPRECIATION OF THE NEWARK SOCIETY OF 
KERAMIC ARTS 

Sara McCampbell 

AS the Keramic world well knows, the work of the Newark 
Society has always been of a very high standard, but 
. at no time in its history has it reached so splendid a plane of 
artistic development as now. Never before has the work 
been of such uniformly high merit. 

No greater tribute could be paid Mr. Marshal Fry, who 
has directed the club for the past two seasons, than this won- 
derfully lovely and distinguished exhibition. That he has 
been able to inspire the workers with new vision, is strongly 
evidenced by the results shown not only in the porcelains and 
linens, but in the flower and table arrangements as well. 



There is harmony in the whole without loss of individuality. 
There is character, without the bizarre; refinement, without 
insipidity, and a charm and dignity and happiness about 
the entire exhibit altogether deligthful and satisfying. As 
one noted the carefully thought out linens, which in most 
cases accompanied the china, one could not help wondering 
if the members fully appreciated that they were being led, 
gently and wisely, into that bigger and broader field of "In- 
terior Decoration." Surely no one could work long on lines 
expressed here in china, linen and glass and not continue his 
thought, to embrace an entire room and its furnishings. 

One would not have the Newark Keramic Society lose 
its significance and identity, but if, as time goes on, it extends 
its interests, more and more, in the "Home Arts," it will 
increase greatly in influence and power. 




NORA FORSTER 




MARSHAL FRY 
NEWARK SOCIETY OF KERAMIC ARTS 



60 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




GRACE CONDIT 



MEDA CASPERSON 




Mrs. Manning Miss Lingley Mrs. J. Waterfield 

Mrs. Everitt Van Voris 



Mary Harrison Miss Ehlers Fanny Clark 




Elizabeth Suber 



Ethel Wing 



Mrs. F. L. Black 



Miss Mosher Charlotte Kroll 

Plates by Helen K. Taylor Miss Finn. 



NEWARK SOCIETY OF KERAMIC ARTS 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



61 




Ends, half of design. 




KATHRYN E. CHERRY - Page Editor 
Marina Building, St. Louis, Mo. 

TILES FOR WINDOW BOX TO BE 
DONE IN ENAMELS 

(Showing both sides) 

BANDS are Night Blue put on twice. 
Six inch tiles used for window 
boxes. Outline in Azure Blue enamel. 
Trunks are Grey Violet enamel. Foli- 
age Oak Brown. Distant hills Lav- 
ender. Middle distance Leaf Green. 
Foreground Grey Green. Shadow on 
foreground Florentine No. 1. Flowers, 
vary them with Warmest Pink and 
Italian Pink. Dark on house Laven- 
der. Light side Jasmine. Sky is Sand. 
Path, Silver Grey. 



62 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




THE LINEN PAGE. 

JETTA EHLERS ------ Page Editor 

i 8 East Kinney Street, Newark, N. J. 

AMONG the wealth of beautiful linens seen recently at 
the various exhibitions were many pieces decorated with 
wood-block printing. Very little of this has been used in the 
past few years and when one considers the simplicity of it and 
the small amount of labor involved it is to wonder why we 
have not turned to it long ago as it answers our purpose so well 
in the working out of simple table things. Only the simplest 
tools are required in the cutting and as linoleum or a prepared 
block has largely superseded the use of wood, the cutting of 
the pattern is not half so difficult as heretofore. 

The most beautiful effects are obtained by the combina- 
tion of embroidery with the printing. For instance the center 
of the floret may be embroidered, the leaves veined with a bit 
of bright color, or baskets and other motifs touched up in like 
manner. The whole effect is very rich and handsome and 
opens up a wide field for those of us who are trying to create 
beauty and keep to the simple life at the same time. Many 
questions have been asked as to the durability of the block 
printing. Any doubts on that score may be set aside for it 
stands repeated laundering and the colors hold for a long time. 
Some people "set" the colors before the first washing by soak- 
ing the piece in fairly strong salt solution for an hour or more. 
The cloth shown in the illustration is part of a set for a luncheon 
service. It is a yard and a quarter square and is made of a 
heavy soft oyster white linen. It is finished with a very narrow 
hem hand sewn. Bands of peach colored linen are appliqued 
to form a border. These are cut five and a half inches wide. 
The inset squares at each corner are the same dimension. This 
provides for the usual turn in of a quarter inch. 

After carefully basting into place they are stitched on the 
machine using peach colors for the top and white for the bottom 
thread. The napkins of the set were cut fifteen inches and the 
applique consists of a square of the peach color in the center. 
The napkin is then folded to bring this square on the top. The 
little basket design with its very simple flowers is printed in 
soft pastel colors. 

The basket is grey with considerable violet. The larger 
flower is grey blue, the one above it a low toned yellow and 



the other a deeper pink than the linen. The leaves are a very 
soft grey green. The colors used are the ordinary tube oil 
paints and the medium is one part Japan dryer to three of 
turpentine. The dryer gives a little more tack to the paint 
and makes a more even print for that reason. The color is 
applied to the block by means of a brush, and to expedite 
matters one for each color where several colors are used. 

Carefully measure just where you wish the print to be 
made and then place the prepared block and give it a firm stroke 
with a mallet or something of the sort. In the instance of the 
cloth illustrated such a humble thing as an old fashioned wooden 
potatoe masher turned the trick. If the paint has been properly 
applied and the right pressure given you should find upon lift- 
ing the block a clean cut impression. The color must be freshly 
applied for each printing. 

The lineoleum blocks may be purchased ready for use but 
if one is unable to get them a piece of heavy lineoleum may be 
glued to a block of wood. Place it bottom side up on the block 
There is another sort of block which I believe is made of a 
composition containing considerable cork. This cuts easily 
but does not make the clean edge that the lineoleum does. 
One can really do a successful block by using a sloyd knife alone 
but the addition of one small slant wood carving tool to cut 
out backgrounds is a great help. 

Make an accurate drawing of your motifs on tracing paper 
and paste it face up upon the block. Then with the sloyd 
knife which is very sharp cut around all the outline and then 
proceed to cut out the background. This will leave your design 
in relief. It is not necessary to cut the background down very 
deeply. In printing lay a piece of soft material over the table 
or drawing board under the piece to be printed. It is a help 
to fasten the work by means of thumb tacks so that it will not 
slip. In applying the color do not use it so wet that it settles 
around the edges of the pattern. A good plan is to have an 
extra piece of linen at hand and to make just the lightest pres- 
sure on it with the block first. This will remove any "puddles" 
and then the print may be made on the other piece with nice 
clean edges using a good firm stroke with the mallet. Several 
tryouts have to be made sometimes before a satisfactory print 
is made. It is better to go about it with extra care than to 
have a sloppy print. 

A very successful table cloth and napkins shown with the 
Newark exhibition consisted of peach colored linen. Upon 
this were applied bands of deep ivory toned linen. The design 
was a small running pattern in soft grey printed upon the peach 
pollen linen just above the hem. The flower form was accen- 
tuated by embroidered dots of the peach color. At the corners 
were round silvered brilliant molds put on by means of snap 
fasteners and supporting tassels made of long narrow button 
molds and coral beads. 

They really were a beautiful added touch of color to the 
cloth even though one "low brow" man talked with considerable 
sarcasm about their being so useful. It can easily be seen that 
very attractive results may be obtained in this way. 

BOX IN SATSUMA (Color Study) 

M. Janie Launt 

TREATMENT developed in enamels. For light spots 
on front wings, eyes and antennae use Orange; on back 
wings Orange Yellow. The dark spots on the front wings of 
the butterfly are Blue Green and Blue, with Blue head. The 
body markings are Blue Green. The body and back wings 
are Grey with a touch of Orange, the border around the edge 
of the box is of the same color. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



63 




TEA SET, MARSH MARIGOLD MOTIF— HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST (Treatment page 64) 



MRS. HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST - Page Editor 

2298 Commonwealth Ave., St. Paul, Minn. 

OUR "PREPAREDNESS" 

THIS is the season for study and recuperation for those who 
are tied to the busy routine of the studio during the nine 
winter months. Also for the student who has been busy learn- 
ing the technique, the actual work of producing the finished 
product. 

The Exhibitions are over, and our thoughts are turned 
forward toward those of next fall and winter and our desire 
to show something different and worth while will lead us in 
many directions for inspiration. 

As to objects for decoration we have already been forced 
to turn to the products of the potteries and glass factories. 
There is an abundance of this former which furnishes practical 
material for experiment. Glass furnishes possibilities in etch- 
ing — gold and enamels — but in this field it is to be hoped that 
the decorators will exercise great restraint. Here even more 
than on china simplicity is desirable. While this is the season 
for study in the fundamentals of design, for gathering materi- 
als for design, for the study of the principles of design, in 
fact it is the season of preparedness. 

We can visit the Museums, the Art Galleries and Art 
Libraries, the woods and the gardens, make drawings of 



plant forms — fill portfolios with these and memoranda of color 
schemes found in nature. 

In years gone by we have hied us to the large studios and 
have copied under supervision the work of the successful 
teachers and in the fall have returned home with our spoils 
and exhibited them to admiring followers. We have depended 
too much on this sort of inspiration to attract pupils to our 
studios in town. We have grown in spite of these methods 
rather than because of them. We have come to see that origi- 
nality, individuality, counts. We need more leaders. We 
need more to recognize our own possibilities. We live under 
a Democracy and are units in a grand scheme. Each has his 
possibilities and each his opportunity to make himself heard. 
There is more good talent latent or unrecognized than there is 
in the limelight. Do not ignore what the leaders are doing 
but search for the sources of their inspiration and develop your 
own latent powers. Education means to draw out from 
within, not to cover with a veneer or even to inoculate. The 
unusual stress of circumstances calls for unusual exertion on 
our part. The demand for the new, the unique, calls for 
original production. This is the season to study fundamentals, 
collect our material, experiment and develop something 
which shall be all our own. If necessity is the mother of in- 
vention, the next few years should develop a host of inventors 
and inventions along new lines. 



64 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



TEA SET— (Page 63) 

Henrietta Barclay Paist 

THIS little unit can be adapted to any plain shape and is 
to be carried out. in green and yellow with white ground. 
The single flower units are for top and base of handles and for 
cover's handles. The creamer calls for three units, the 
sugar bowl two or four and the teapot five including the spout. 
The bands are to be in green (flat or enamel). There is a 
scarcity of shapes in white china but many lovely little sets 
can be found in pottery from the various factories in lovely 
soft blues, yellow, green, brown and rose tints. These can 
be decorated in relief without outlines. These sets usually 
have the tea tile to match and the little unit shown can be 
applied in the center. 

«r *• 

PROVERBS FOR THE CHINA DECORATOR 

Henrietta Barclay Paist 

A bird on a vase is worth two in a tree — (especially if 
the vase is Satsuma and done in enamels.) 

It's a wise designer who knows her own design after the 
china painters have juggled with it. 

Learn to make your own designs and it will follow as the 
night the day — you'll not be tempted to copy those of others. 

A china decorator is not without honor except in her own 
Club and among her own Club members. 

A piece of china whole is worth a dozen cracked. 

It's as hard for the china painter's ethics to stand the fiery 
test as for her products to go through the hands of the "hired 
girl". 

A married artist has to be as agile as a Swiss bell ringer. 

Better is a dish with no decoration than one covered up 
with bad ornament. 

China painters indulge too much in that sincerest form 
of flattery. 

As the work is performed the jury is inclined. 

Don't count your prizes before they are awarded. 

The prizes fall to the just and the near-just. 

Hell hath no fury like the unlucky exhibitor at the State 
Fair. 

None but the fair deserve the prizes. 

Wrong names on large vases are often seen in public 
places. 

The sauce for the Gander is served in a dish which was 
painted by the Goose. 



As long as the kilns hold out to burn, the vilest china will 
return. 

The china painter paints china though no buyer persueth. 

It is not nearly as hard for a china decorator to get into 
the Kingdom of Heaven as it is for her to break into an estab- 
lished Art Society and the chances are that she'll feel more 
welcome in the first mentioned place — because Heaven is sure 
of its reputation and can afford to be a bit lenient. 

All of the arts may constitute one big family but until 
recently china decorators had to furnish the dishes for the rest 
of the family to eat on and eat their meals in the kitchen and 
then wash the dishes afterward. It is only of late that they've 
made up their minds that they ought to eat with the rest of 
the family and are studying company manners so that the family 
won't be ashamed of them. 

FLOWER MEDALLIONS (Page 65) 

Adeline More 

NUMBER 1 — Apple Blossoms — Green leaves are Apple 
Green, Brown Green, Shading Green. Stems Violet 
and Blood Red. Flowers Pink and Yellow for Painting. 

Number 2 — Rose — Paint rose with Pink shaded with a 
little Mauve. Leaves are Yellow Green and Copenhagen 
Blue. Basket is Grey for Flesh. 

Number 3 — Chrysanthemums — Leaves are Shading Green 
and Apple Green. Flowers Yellow for Painting, Yellow Brown 
and a little Brown Green. 

Number 4 — Forget-me-nots — Leaves Shading Green, Apple 
Green. Flowers Turquoise Blue, Banding Blue. Centers Yel- 
low, a touch of Yellow Red. The buds have a little Pink in them. 

Number 5 — Hawthorne — Leaves Yellow Green and Yellow 
shaded with Brown Green and Shading Green. Flowers are 
Pink . Centers Yellow for Painting and Yellow Brown. 

Number 6 — Asters — Leaves Brown Green, Shading Green 
and a little Yellow Green. Flowers Mauve and Banding Blue. 
The palest ones are Turquoise Blue. 

Number 7— Rose — Leaves Brown Green and Yellow 
Green. Flowers Yellow for Painting, Albert Yellow, Brown 
Green. Centers Yellow Brown and Yellow Red. 

Number 8 — Nasturtium — Leaves Shading Green and 
Apple Green. Stems Mauve and Blood Red. Buds Carna- 
tion and Yellow Brown. Flower Yellow for Painting and 
Albert Yellow, touches of Blood Red. 

Number 9 — Violets — Leaves Apple Green and Yellow 
Brown, Green and Shading Green. Stems Mauve and Brown 
Green. Flowers Turquoise Blue, Mauve and Banding Blue. 
Centers Yellow and Yellow Red. 




Louise McDougall 



Annie V. Lingley 



Miss Kroll 
Mrs. J. Waterfield 



Mrs. Tm. T. Woodruff 
Annie Payne Mrs. J. Waterfield 



Miss Ehlers 
Marguerite Cameron 



NEWARK SOCIETY OF KERAMIC ARTS 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



65 








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FLOWER MEDALLIONS— ADELINE MORE 



(Treatment page 64) 



66 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




BIRD DESIGN FOR TILE— MAUD M. MASON 



MAUD M. MASON 

218 West 59th Street, New York City 



Page Editor 



BIRD DESIGN FOR TILE 

THE bird design for a tile would be effective developed in 
lustres, by first toning the tile with a rich golden brown 
lustre and firing it before painting on the design. A good tint 
for this purpose would be equal parts of Brown and Orange 
lustres thinned with a little essence, painted on very evenly 
with a large shader or padded. After the design is traced, 
outline the pattern with a delicate ink line just inside of the 
light spaces, as few lines as will serve as a guide, as the lustre 
must not go over them. Then carefully clean off the greasy 
tracing and paint all the darks with copper lustre. 

Lustres on these soft tiles require a very light firing. Tiles 
treated in this manner would be very handsome around a fire 
place giving a very sparkling and glowing effect as they re- 
flect everything near them. 

A color scheme in enamels would also be effective. For 
this purpose use' the Mason soft enamels. Dark Blue for the 
darks — Lavender Blue plus equal parts of White for lights. 

Another Scheme — Black Enamel for the darks, with 
Emerald Green and Citron Yellow distributed in the bird and 
wing forms. 



IN REGARD TO THE CHINA SITUATION 

WHILE some of our workers are experiencing difficulties 
in obtaining the French and German wares to which 
they have been accustomed, this fact need not prove to be a 
source of inconvenience or trouble, as it brings to our attention 
the possibilities of other wares such as the Japanese and wares 
of home manufacture Of the latter I have used many of the 
large bowls as well as smaller pieces most successfully and 
although they are heavy, they are usually simple and interest- 
ing in form and take both enamels and lustres satisfactorily. As 
their glaze is soft, they require only a moderate firing. It 
is always well first to experiment with a small piece in a simple 
design, in order to acquaint oneself with the possibilities of the 
glazes before attempting a very elaborate decoration. 

In my class at the Fawcett School some of the most inter- 
esting pieces decorated this year have been a group of common 
yellow cooking bowls bought for ten cents at a five and ten 
cents store. They were good in form and lovely in color, 
being a beautiful tawny yellow and when decorated in simple 
designs in black and brilliant colors in harmony with the char- 
acter of the bowls, they made very interesting pieces. 

A very amusing story was told me of the purchase of these 
bowls. The saleswoman in the shop thought the first pur- 
chaser was decidedly over fastidious in the selection of her 
ten cent bowl, but when a second purchaser happened in and 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



67 



was equally fastidious, and then a third, and a fourth, and 
fifth, etc. she became convinced that the young women of 
Newark had gone quite mad over yellow bowls. These bowls 
proved real joys however and are very stunning as receptacles 
for fruit. 

Tea sets, breakfast, lemonade or water sets may be ob- 
tained in Japanese wares in a variety of colors ranging from 
an ivory to deep yellow, grey blues, violet etc., all of which 
may be made most decorative and charming. I have found 
these wares fire most satisfactorly and are splendidly adapted 
to soft enamels. Tea sets, cups and saucers may be obtained 
in the grey crackled ware, as well as fine vases in all sizes. 
Every one knows of the good things to be had in Satsuma, 
many beautiful lamp jars and bowls as well as table ware. 
The Sedji ware will never lose its charm. I have recently 
seen a set with rose enamel dominating the color scheme which 
was most interesting. White enamel can also be introduced 
with good effect on many of the colored wares. The use of 
all these wares lends variety to our work and it is always an 
added satisfaction to make the best possible use of the thing 
at hand. 

These colored wares are very suggestive and compelling 
in working out color schemes in table decorations and suggest 
the use of some of the same color in table linens in combina- 
tion with either white or some light toned linen harmonizing 
with it. Such linens must be daintily made by hand to be 
thoroughly refined. Bands may be joined by a filet crochet 
or more simply done with very dainty stitchery. Such linens 
if not exquisitely made may easily become common and ordi- 
nary. We must exercise restraint and good taste here, for 
is anything more indicative of the gentle-woman than her 
household linens? We must not however lose sight of the 
fact that our table linens should be in accord with our wares 
and with the surroundings. Simple linens in harmonious 




colors used with these wares and simply decorated, are most 
satisfying, but we must not stop there, we must also meet 
the need for more elegant wares and surroundings by the use 
of richer textiles and decorations. 

So it behooves us not to be discouraged over the present 
situation, there being no need for such discouragement, but 
take advantage of whatever presents itself that is good in 
form'or color and suggests an artistic and useful purpose. 




VARIOUS SHAPES TABLE GLASS FOR DECORATION 
From the United States Glass Co. 



SOME GLASS SHAPES FOR DECORATION 
Candle sticks and flower bowls in ebony, white, green and blue. 

From the Cambridge Glass Works 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

M. C. K. — Will you kindly tell me the correct coloring to use on a mulberry 
Seji Porch Set in 0' Hara enamels'? I have adopted two designs from the April 
K. S. and the same coloring could be used for either (?) If I use black enamel 
line in the border must it be used also somewhere in the design in center of plates? 

We are not familiar enough with the colors to be able to give you the 
names, Mrs. O'Hara would probably be glad to give them to you. Black, 
yellow, a little bright green and a deeper shade of purple would go nicely 
with the ware. 

2. The black will depend on the design, it usually gives a better balance 
of color to have it in the design also. 

B. H. — I painted a breakfast set in La Croix's Delfl Blue. I used only 
that color on the set, it came out alright, seemed to be fired enough, but she used 
the plates to serve salad and lemon and the acid changed the color and seemed to 
take the paint off. Can you tell me the trouble and what can I do with the china? 

The color was evidently under-fired. If the color cannot be patched by 
painting it on, it could be oiled and the dry color dusted on. 

There is a new book just out that you will want to read 
if you are really in earnest about your china decoration. It 
is Edward Potter's Douris and the Painters of Greek Vases, 
(E. P. Dutton & Co., N. Y.) It is an excellent history of 
Greek vases, their decoration and the sources of inspiration. 
The illustrations are unusually beautiful. 



68 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




SHORT CAKE SET, STRAWBERRY FLOWER (Page 69) 

Albert W. Heckman 
CLOWERS are a very light Lemon Yellow. Buds are 
* Albert Yellow and dots in center of flower are Yellow 
Brown. Leaves are Waterlily Green and bands forming 
structure of design may be painted in with Green Gold and 
outlined with Moss Green or they may be dusted with four 
parts Glaze for Green and one part Waterlily Green. 



MRS. VERNIE LOCKWOOD WILLIAMS - Page Editor 

University of Pittsburg. Home Studio, 52 W. Maiden St., Washington, Pa. 

BORDER DESIGN 

THE motive for this design was the outline drawing of a 
fish. The unit is repeated six times on a six inch Sat- 
suma jardiniere. The body of the fish, dark blue enamel. 
Large fins, grey green, striped with red, also the dark portions 
extending below the stripes. Smaller fins above are brighter 
green enamel. Upper fins and spaces over eyes, a greyer blue 
than the body. Band at the top, gold, red, green or dark 
blue enamel; those at base, dark blue. Eyes red. Middle 
portion of the body and space between fins, yellow brown. 
Tea to desired tone. Any color treatment desired may be used. 




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FULL SIZE SECTION 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



69 



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70 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




CUP AND SAUCER— ELISE W. TALLY 



BEGINNERS' CORNER 

JESSIE M. BARD ------ Page Editor 

Dickinson Seminary, Williamsport, Pa. 

CUP AND SAUCER 

TO be done on Seji ware. Design in borders and stems in 
medallion are Green Gold. Small light space in borders 
and outline of flowers are Black Enamel. Large light space 
in border and leaves in medallions are 3 Grass Green and 1 
white enamel. Outside petals of flower are Citron Yellow. 
Large center space is Orange No. 3. 



BREAKFAST SET (Page 70 

DIVIDE the plate into 12 parts. To find the center of a 
plate, take a narrow strip of paper and measure the 
width of the plate, fold this in half and lay the paper hori-. 
zontally on the plate and place a small ink mark on the plate 
opposite the half mark on the paper. Hold the plate in the 
same position and divide the plate on the opposite direction 
or vertically, place a mark opposite the half mark again and 
where the vertical and horizontal marks cross is the center of 
the plate. Make a tracing of the entire center design and one 
section of the outer edge design. Transfer the design to the 
plate according to instruction in previous lesson. Oil the 
dark grey tone with Special Medium and dust with Grey Blue. 
Oil the light tone in the flowers and dust with 2 parts Cameo 



and 1 part Peach Blossom. Clean off all the color from places 
where it should not be and paint the black tones with Green 
Gold. 

•> ♦ ♦> 

TAKING LESSONS 

Ethel Naubert Hamilton 

IN arranging to take lessons in china painting (or any other 
lessons for that matter) aim to be at the studio promptly 
at the lesson hour. Have you ever waited any length of time 
for a person? Then have some regard for your teacher. There 
is nothing that I know of that will give a lesson a poorer start 
than to have pupils straggle in at their own convenience. I 
am sure your teacher is never late. 

Then be sure to bring your own materials — don't depend 
on anyone else to bring your paint-rags, silk padder, brushes, 
turpentine, etc. Don't tell all your troubles to the art class 
or monopolize the conversation. Some teachers ask pupils 
to refrain from talking in class except when the subject relates 
to china painting or subjects closely related to it. This is 
undoubtedly the ideal system. 

Always look for the beautiful in everything. If you find 
any good colorings in branches of fruit, vegetables, flowers, 
leaves, etc., bring them to class. Study tapestries, wall-paper, 
carpets, pictures, cloth, and such diversified subjects for color 
effects, form and suitability. After finding out the combina- 
tions that are most pleasing to you, aim to carry them out on 
your china. Bring your ideas to your teacher and she may be 
able to work out a beautiful design for you. Give her big 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



7j 



bunches of flowers often and see how much faster the lesson 
time goes. 

Now we come to the difficult part — the payment for les- 
sons. Charges vary in different localities but a dollar a lesson 
or six lessons for five dollars (payable in advance) is a moderate 
price. Before lesson time, inquire of your teacher what her 
price is and pay her when she desires you to. Some teachers 
like settlements made at the close of each lesson; this system 
does away with bookkeeping and the sending of bills. I have 
heard of people paying twenty-five cents for an afternoon's 
lesson and I have also heard of people who pay but ten cents 
for a gold (?) ring. 

Don't blame your teacher for everything. Most students 
seem to think that the firing of their china will cover any or all 
of the mistakes they have made, or that the firer, as she puts 



her best efforts into the kiln, can wave a magic wand and 
accomplish the same result. This is an erroneous idea. All 
mistakes should be corrected before the firing, not after. 

Be careful not to copy everything you see made in the 
class. At one time I had five pupils making marmalade jars 
in oranges all exactly alike. This is as tiresome to the pupils 
as it is to the teacher. Be sure to leave on time. If you are 
taking a three hour lesson, go when your time is up. If you 
try to rush part of your work, you will only spoil it, as you 
will most likely be tired. "Haste makes waste." 
Points Covered 

1. Promptness. 5. Pay on time. 

2. Own Supplies. 6. Don't blame teacher. 

3. Keep on the subject. 7. Don't copy. 

4. Study color, form, etc. 8. Leave on time. 




BREAKFAST SET— LOLA ST. JOHN 



(Treatment page 70) 



72 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




PANSY PLATE— MAY E. REYNOLDS 



MAY E. REYNOLDS ------ p AGE Editor 

116 Auditorium Building, Chicago, III. 



PANSY PLATE 

FIRST Fire— Outline the flowers in outlining ink. The 
design is outlined in Paris Brown, and the lines and bands 
are also in Paris Brown. Paint pansies in Violet, and a touch 
of Best Black, Yellow Brown in centers, the light pansies are 
in Lemon Yellow, Albert Yellow, Violet of Iron, and Best 
Black in centers. Leaves in Empire Green with a touch of 
Violet, lay in background of the flowers in Green Gold. 

Second Fire — Dust on the tint over the design with 
Lavender Glaze using the Special Tinting Oil to dust it on. 
Pansies are retouched with same colors used in first fire, put 
on Green Gold in background of flowers. This design can 
also be done in enamels. 

I AM writing to everyone urging them to subscribe for the 
magazine if they are not already subscribers, as I think that 
such an earnest effort as the magazine is making to keep paint- 
ers interested in the work, the manner in which you are going 
conscientiously on, and even getting out each month a finer 
and more interesting Keramic Studio, should be appreciated, 
especially in view of the present conditions and times. All 
should join with you in making this year, the season of 1917, 
the greatest year in the history of china painting. I think 
that such a thing could easily be done, as with added stimulus, 
the very fact that china is not so plentiful as formerly should 
add new zeal, and a desire to overcome obstacles. If each indi- 
vidual china painter should make up her mind resolutely to do 
better, and more work, and to interest more pupils in her neigh- 
borhood, this could easily be accomplished, When everything 
is too plentiful, and times are too prosperous it leads to a certain 
apathy, and people do not make that strenous effort to accom- 
plish big things, so that the very fact that there is an obstacle to 
overcome should be the slogan for new and renewed effort, which 
would, if all the decorators pull together, make the year 1917 a 
record year in this work. I know this has already been accom- 



plished by a number of music teachers who have joined their 
forces and in several cases incorporated here in Chicago, and 
are having bigger classes than in the past and will succeed, indeed 
have already, in interesting more students to take up the work. 
Music is very closely allied to painting, and the two go hand in 
hand so that decorators if they band together can accomplish 
the same results. Now that many say times are not so good 
there is more reason for young women, and older women too for 
that matter, people who will be left to support themselves, to 
look to it that they learn something practical like the decora- 
tion of china which, while homes exist, will always be an every 
day necessity, and a commodity that being breakable and 
fragile neebs constantly to be replaced. There is no more 
sensible, useful, or necessary study that any woman can take 
up than the decoration of china, nor one which she can pursue 
more pleasantly and profitably than china painting. There 
is more room in the country for good painters than ever before, 
and all we need are earnest workers who will strive to do the 
best work that is in them. Never before has decoration not 
only of china and pottery, but textiles, etc., been so appreciated, 
and in fact if we look around us we will find that this is the age 
of decoration, and that foremost in demand and profit, on 
account of its general constant use, is china painting. 

The musicians here incorporated companies so that several 
teachers could pay the rent of one studio, and in this way cut 
down expenses, then they have a central office in the same build- 
ing where they have a secretary, and advertising force who are 
constantly looking up new students; one office of this sort is 
supported by probably twenty or more music teachers; in this 
way they all have more pupils and their expenses are not as 
much as formerly, in fact they are doing better than ever before. 
You see by all making a strenous effort what is possible to be 
done; the china painters in every city could band together and 
do the same, or at least have meetings so that they could buy 
china in partnership, and by buying in larger quantity could 
probably get a better rate, and by getting up exhibits and dis- 
plays of china, create interest in good work, also by having 
bazars where the china could be sold they would find a ready sale 
if the matter were taken up seriously. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



73 



MY COUNTRY'S FLOWER 

(Continued from Editorial page) 

The columbine's flowers are composed of five petals, like 
tiny cornucopias, suggesting our horn of plenty, and hers 
deserve that name also. Some have called these liberty caps; 
and as she is a little goddess of liberty, it is a pleasing conceit. 
There are five sepals forming a star about her winsome face, 
which suggests our star of destiny. 

She has been called a coquette; but her charming coquetry 
is for her friends, the bumblebee and the scarlet-throated 
humming bird, her real benefactors. For them she wears 
her most brilliant colors, and they in turn bring her the golden 
pollen in exchange for her nectar stores; no idle play, but reci- 
procity in its fullest sense. She cannot be called bold, for 
she seeks the wild places for her habitat. Where other flowers 
would die, we find her poised, like some brilliant bird, sub- 
sisting on little except air and sunshine. She is a flower of 
the sun, and it has been said that she was a favorite of the 
lion, the sun-emblem of the ancients. 

There are many beautiful varieties of the columbine the 
world over. But three are distinctly American: the red, 
aquilegia canadensis, found most commonly in the eastern and 
central sections of the United States; the white, aquilegia alba, 
found in the extreme Western states, eastern California and 
parts of the Rocky Mountains; the blue aquilegia carulea, 
growing in the Rocky Mountains. This variety is the State 
flower of California. 

She has found her way into heraldic blazonry — her red 
for magnanimity, her white for innocence, her blue for loyalty. 

Spenser, Chaucer, Shakespeare and many other poets 
have paid her homage. 

There is a deep reason for adopting a flower that shall be 
known as the floral emblem of the United States of America. 
What are we doing in the arts and crafts for posterity that is 
purely national? 

How the nations of yesterday lived, what they believed 
and what their aspirations were are largely conjecture; but 
what they did with their hands — the work of their arts and 
crafts — has survived; out of stone and marble blocks, with 
crude tools, but skillful hands and inspired souls, they made 
some beloved flower to blossom with such exquisite grace that 
it became a part of their country's history. 

Why have the lotus and the acanthus reigned supreme 
in architectural ornamentation since some sculptor dreamed 
them into inspiring forms of beauty and mathematical strength? 
Because the fitness and symmetry of their forms are especially 
fine in supporting and capping the columns used in imposing 
architecture; because lesser adaptations of these same units 
are equally pleasing in interior decoration. 

We should encourage architectural ornamentation which 
is national in expression in our imposing edifices. By them 
we may be immortalized. I believe this can be accomplished 
by adopting a national floral emblem for the United States — 
one that cheers us by her beauty, stimulates us by her character, 
and inspires a spirit of patriotic pride in our ornamental 
endeavor. To this end I present Columbia's Floral Gem, 
The Columbine. 

*** 1? 

STUDIO NOTE 

Mrs. Blanche Van Court Boudinot, of Chicago, has for 
some time past been located at her home studio 1316 Albion 
Avenue. 

The book offer to Subscribers of Keramic Studio is worth 
while! Send for particulars. There is a time limit. 



D. M. CAMPANA ART CO. 



nc. 



MONOGEAMiBOOK 40c 

THE TEACHER OF OIL PAINTING 

BOOK 50c 

THE TEACHER OF WATER COLOR 

PAINTING BOOK 50c 

THE TEACHER OF DRAWING FIG- I I 

URES FROMf NATURE 75c 

THE TEACHER OF CONVEN- 
TIONAL DECORATING BOOK..90c 

LUSTRE BOOK 45c 

FIRING BOOK 30c 

THREE DECORATIVE DESIGN 

Books 1, 2, 3. 535 Orig. Designs....$2.10 

THE LEATHER CRAFT BOOK 40c 

FLEXIBLE RULES 18 INCH 30c 

GOLD REMOVER! NON-ACID 25c 

CAMPANA'S KILN MENDING 

MOIST CLAY, PER CAN 30c 

ONE FIRING INK, FIRES BLACK 

Per Bottle 20c 

NOTICE OUR 



iter color medium 
open. Finest thing. 



OPEN-INE, the ne 
made to keep coli 

Per Bottle 25c 

COVERED PALETTE, 8x10 57c 

FINE ROSE STUDY,*9xl5 25c 

FINE GRAPE STUDY, 9x15 25c 

LIQUID ERASER, for fired colors. ..45c 
CAMPANA'S DILUTING MEDIUM 

FOR OUTLINING 25c 

OPAL LUSTRE, FINEST 16c 

BEST MOTHER PEARL 20c 

STERLING ROMAN SILVER 

VERY SMOOTH, Per Box 35c 

CAMPANA'S PURITY GOLD 

THIS MONTH, PER BOX 48c 

Campana's catalog contains thousands of 
other specialties. Colors in vials and bulk. 
Golds in bulk. Moderate price goods abso- 
lutely guaranteed. 
NEW ADDRESS 



323 SOUTH WABASH AVENUE, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



ADD O "I " can supply everything 
V-VDDW I I for the 

CHINA PAINTER and ARTIST. 

Send for New Illustrated Catalog of Art Material. 
A. H. ABBOTT & CO. 

General Offices and Wholesale Dept. 208-210-212 South Wabash Ave., 

Retail Store 19 North Wabash Avenue 
CHICAGO, ILL. 



Copy for advertisements for Sept. number should be in by 
AUGUST 1st. 
Keramic Studio Publishing Co. 



We have purchased several large 

"Stocks"of White China 

in this country, and with what 

China We Had of Our Own 

will give us a fairly good, but not 
complete stock for this fall. 



We expect to get out a 

Completely Revised Catalogue 

to be mailed in August. 
If you don't receive it send for one. 

W. A. MAURER, Council Bluffs, la. 

MFG. KLONDIKE GOLD— AGT. LIMOGE'S COLORS 
AGT. REVELATION KILNS 



VI 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



The Art Institute of Chicago— 

N. H. Carpenter, Secretary and Director, pro tern. 

School of Drawing, Painting, Sculpture, Illustrating, 
Designing, Normal Instruction, 

Ceramic Design and Decoration 

Send for Catalogue Department K, Chicago, 111. 

Miss Jessie M. Bard 

INSTRUCTOR IN 

Design, Jewelry, Leather Work and China Decoration 

The Williamsport-Dickinson Seminary, Willien.Bport, Pa. 

Blanche Van Court Boudinot 

HOME STUDIO 1316 ALBION AVE., CHICAGO, ILL. 

Special designs in naturalistic, conventional, semi-conventional 
and enamel work, made to your order on china or in water colors. 
STUDIES FOR SALE AND RENT 

SCHNEIDERS CHINA AND LEATHER COLORS 
FOR SALE 

Telephone Rogers Park 6185 

Mrs. K. E. Cherry 

DESIGNS TO ORDER 



MARINA BUILDING, STUDIO 1, 2. 



ST. LOUIS. MO. 



Jessie Louise Clapp 

TEACHER OF CHINA DECORATION 

IN THE USE OF "COOVER'S OUTLINE DESIGNS" AND 

K. E. CHERRY'S COLORS AND ENAMELS, ETC. 

Sphinx Gold, Roman-Unfluxed, White, Green, 

67 cents per box post-paid. 
INSTRUCTION BY MAIL IF DESIRED. 

516 McCarthy Building, SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

THIS SPACE together with name and address 
in "The Directory" $3.00 Per Month 

A YEAR'S CONTRACT CARRIES WITH IT A YEAR'S 

SUBSCRIPTION TO THIS MAGAZINE. 

Discount on yearly contracts 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 

Miss Mabel C. Dibble 

STUDIO— 806 Marshall Field Building 

110 N. Wabash Avenue, Chicago. 

Teacher of Conventional Enamel Work on Porcelain. 

Water color designs for rent. Catalogue. 

Send for price list of my enamels. Full size vials. 

Prepared and bottled in my studio. 

Enamels sold as mine at 10c, small vial, are imitations. 

Booklet on Enamel Work 50o. 

Edna Louise Einbigler 

600 WEST 113 STREET, NEW YORK. 
Instructor in China Decoration, Conven- 
tional and Naturalistic, Enamels. 

Telephone Morningside 7686. 

Jetta Ehlers 

STUDIO 18 EAST KINNEY ST., NEWARK:, N. J. 

PORCELAIN DECORATION AND DESIGN 
PLANS FOR TABLE LINENS 

Linens and materials for working purchased on commission. 

Miss Gertrude Estabrooks 

Water Color Pictures to Rent — Heads, Flowers, Land- 
scapes and Fruit. Send for Catalogue. 
Book on Methods and Colors, in Water Colors. Price $1. 

Lessons in Water Color, Oil and Tapestry. 
17 N. State St., Stevens Bldg., Room 1505, Chicago, ill. 



Mrs. A. A. Frazee 

STUDIO 919 FINE ARTS BUILDING 

410 Michigan Boulevard, South, Chicago 
Teacher of Conventional Deiijn and Enamel Work on Porcelain 

Send for my Tested, Hard and Satsuma Enamel. 

Original Designs for Conventional Work made to Order. 

Importer of Royal Satsuma for Decorating 



Teachers' Directory 



California 

LOS ANGELES 

Chapman-Bailey Studio, 416-417 Blan- 
chard Building, 233 S. Broadway 



District oi 

WASHINGTON 
Sherratt Art Studic 



3 13th St. N. W. 



Illinois 

CHICAGO 

D. M. Campana Art School, 323-325 S. 
Wabash Ave 

Miss Mabel C. Dibble, Studio 806 Mar- 
shall Field Building 

Mrs. A. A. Frazee, 918 Fine Arts Bldg., 
410 Michigan Boulevard, So. 

Blanche Van Court Boudinot, 1316 
Albion Avenue 

Gertrude Estabrooks, Room 1505, 17 
N. State St., Stevens Building 

The Art Institute of Chicago, Dept K. 

lone Libby Wheeler, 1020 Fine Arts 
Building, 410 Michigan Boulevard. 

Prof. Franz J. Schwarz, 5322 Wash- 
ington Boulevard. 

St. Louis School of Fine Arts. Washing, 
ton University, Skinker Road and 
Linden Boulevard. 



Iowa 

DAVENPORT 

Miss Edith Alma Ross. 312 E. 14th St. 
DES MOINES 

Miss Frances Blanchard, No. 3 Flor- 
entine Building, 7th and Locust St. 



SHREVEPORT 
Mrs. Anna C. 
Street. 



Tarrant, 1004 Jorda: 



Missouri 
ST. LOUIS 

Mrs. K. E. Cherry, M 
Grand and Lindell A 



Minnesota 

ST. PAUL 

Henrietta Barclay Paist, 2298 Co: 
monwealth Avenue 



New Jersey 
NEWARK 

Mrs. F. N. Waterfield, 149 Washington 

Street 
Miss Charlotte Kroll, 149 Washington 
Street 

New York 

BUFFALO 

Mrs. C. C. Filkins, 609 Main Street 
NEW YORK 

Edna Louise Einbigler, 600 West 113 

Street 
Mrs. Ada Murray Travis, Florentine 

Court, 166 West 129th St., cor. 7th 

Avenue 
Miss M. M. Mason, 218 West 59th St. 
Rhoda Holmes Nicholls, 39 W. 07th St. 
Mrs. L. Vance-Phillips, 13 Central Park 

West 
Miss Fannie M. Scammell, 244 West 

104th Street 
Lillie M. Weaver, 159 W. 125th St., 

(cor. 7th Ave.) 

SYRACUSE 

Miss Jessie Louise Clapp, McCarthy 
Block, corner South Salina and Onon- 
daga Streets. 

Ohio 

COLUMBUS 

Miss Mint M. Hood, 1092 E. Rich St. 



PHILADELPHIA 

A. B. Cobden 13 South 16th St. 

Tennessee 
CHATTANOOGA 

Mrs. B. B. Crandall, 220 E. Terrace 



MILWAUKEE 

Anna E. Pierce and Adele P. Chai 

194 12th St. 



Mrs. F. N. Waterfield 
Miss Charlotte Kroll 

DOMESTIC ART ROOMS, 149 Washington St., Newark, N. J. 

Importers and Dealers in China for Decorating 

PAINTS, MEDIUMS, ETC. CHINA FIRED DAILY 

Agents for Perfection Kilns 

Send for our "Rose," stands repeated firings, 25c per vial 



Miss M. M. Mason 

218 West 59th St., New York 



THE PRINCIPLES OF DESIGN— with studio work 
for teachers, craftsmen and designers. 



CERAMICS— the 

— modeling i 
forms. 
Catalogue of designs upon request 



e of colors, enamels, and lustres, 
clay — the building of pottery 



Rhoda Holmes Nicholls 

CLASSES IN WATER COLORS AND OILS 
Colonial Studios, 39 W. 67th St., New York City 



Henrietta Barclay Paist 

A Non-resident Coarse of Design for the China Decorator. 

Simple and practical. 

This course was the outcome of a demand for help in this direction 

and has been in practice since 1910. 

The advantages are obvious. You can put yourself 

in the Creative Class. Write for particulars. 

Special arrangements for Clubs or groups of four or more. 

2298 Commonwealth Avenue, ST. PAUL, MINN. 



Emily F. Peacock 

104 South Street, Freehold, N. J. 
DEALER IN UNUSUAL ANTIQUES 
Miss Edith Alma Ross 

New Studies in Water Color for Rent 
New designs for china decoration, naturalistic and conventional 
New water color studies for landscape and flower painting. 
New designs for china arranged in sets. 
Studies sent on approval upon receipt of reference. 
For price-list AddreBs 312 E. Fourteenth St., Davenport, Iowa. 
Special designs made to order. 

WANTED ! 

Copies of Palette and Bench for October 1909. 
Quote price. 
Address, 

Keramic Studio Publishing Co., 

Syracuse, N. Y. 

Mrs. Anna C. Tarrant 

1004 Jordan Street, SHREVEPORT, LA. 

TEACHER OF CHINA DECORATION 

OUT OF TOWN STUDENTS, 

write for terms and particulars. 

CHINA FIRED DAILY. MATERIALS. 

Mrs. Ada Murray Travis Ss^Mor'ningaide 

Studio Florenliiu Court 166 Wtsl lZ9th St., New York City 

TO OUT OF TOWN TEACHERS 
I have one of the largest collections of New and Original 
Designs for Enamel in Water Colors either for sale or rent. 

Designs sent an approval. 
Also have large assortment of Conventional and Naturalistic. 

LHIie M. Weaver Telephone 5885 Morningside 

CLASSES IN CHINA DECORATION 

Conventional, Naturalistic, Enamels, Lusters. 

OIL PAINTING 

Landscape. Still Life. 

Studio 159 W. 125th Street, (corner 7th Avenue) 

NEW YORK CITY. 

Expert Firing Daily. Especial Attention to Enamels. 

ONE YEAR OF KERAMIC STUDIO 

and 
MRS. PAIST'S BOOK ON DESIGN 

(Paper Cover) 

$5.00 in U. S.; $5.25 in Canada; $5.50 in Foreign. 

Keramic Studio Pub. Co., Syracuse, N. Y. 



When writing to advertisers please mention this magazine 





SUBSCRIBER 



Book of 
Cups as Saucers 




A REMARKABLE BOOK OFFER! 

Subject to change without notice! 
50 per cent Discount on the Following 

Regular Price. 

Class Room No. 1 . Art of Teaching, etc., $3.00 

" No. 2. Flower Painting, etc., 3.00 

" No. 3. Figure Painting, etc., 3.00 

" " No. 4. Conventional Decoration, etc. 3.00 

Little Things to Make, %$£&*£&!&& 2.00 

Book of Cups and Saucers, 1 .50 

THIS IS AN OPPORTUNITY 
OPEN TO ALL SUBSCRIBERS OF KERAMIG STUDIO. 

NOTE.—Many are taking advantage of these prices. 
Why not you ? Do not wait another day ! 



KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO., SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



&*« 




:i aiuv 










i and ': 




The entire contents of this Magazine are covered by the general copyright and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 



CONTENTS OF SEPTEMBER, 1917 



Editorial 

At the Sign of the Brush and Palette 

Vegetable Marrow Motifs 

The Linen Page 

Powder Box 

Floral Tile in Soft Relief Enamels 

Answers to Correspondents 

Japanese Tea Set 

Design Contests 

Belleefc Bowls 

Cop and Saucer 

Color Study with application of design 

Beginners' Corner 



Anita Gray Chandler 
Henrietta Barclay Paist 
Jetta Ehlers 
Kathryn E. Cherry 
Maud M. Mason 

Mrs. Vernie Lockwood Williams 

Walter K. Titze 
May E. Reynolds 
Vera Stone 
Jessie M, Bard 



Page 
75 
76 
77 
78 
79 
80 
80 
81 
81 
82 
83 

84-90 
90 



THESE BOOKS SENT POST-PAID 
ON RECEIPT OF PRICE 

Mm. Filkin'i A. B. C. for Beginner* in China Painting $1.00 

How to apply Enamels by Mabel C. Dibble 50 

Book on Methoda for painting in Water Color by Gertrude Estabrook 1.00 

Colors and Coloring in China Painting 25 

Lunn's Practical Pottery, 2 vols, (or vo\m. sold singly 82.15 each) 4.00 

The Teacher of China Painting by D. M. Campana. — 79 

Firing China and Glass by Campana _ „.. .37 

Book of Monograms by Campana _. 42 

Books 2 and 3 "Decorative Designs," by Campana, each S3 

'Water Color Painting," Designs by Campagna, 53 

'The Teacher of Oil Painting," Designs by Campana 53 

Flat Enamel Decoration in China by Mrs. L. T. Steward 1.25 

Home Furnishing by Alice M. Kellogg (Pub. at 1.50) 75 

The Human Figure by Vanderpool 2.00 

Marks of American Potters by E. A. Barber™ „ 2.25 

American Glassware, Old and New 1.00 

Grand Feu Ceramics 5.00 

The Fruit Book 3.00 

The Rose Book 3.00 

The Art of Teaching China Decoration, Class Room No. 1 3.00 

Flower Painting on Porcelain, Class Room No. 2 3.00 

Figure Painting on Porcelain and Firing, Class Room No. 3 3.00 

ConTentional Decoration of Pottery and Porcelain, Class Room No. 4.. 3.00 

Book of Cups and Saucers 1-60 

Book of Little Things to Make 2.00 

Keramic Decorations Nellie F. Mcintosh 1.00 

Eberlein & McClure's "Practical Book of Early American Arts and 

Crafts," post paid, net 6.00 

"Handicrafts for the Handicapped" by Herbert J. Hall and Mertice M. 

C. Buck, post paid 1-35 

Pottery for Artists, Craftsmen and Teachers by Geo. J. Cox, 1.36 



REMITTANCES!!! 



We prefer Money-Order or New York Draft but if check 
is more convenient add the cost of Exchange which in N. Y. 
State is 10 cents.— KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO. 



Design and the Decoration of Porcelain, by Henrietta Barclay Paist 

■^ Paper Cover $1.50 Cloth Coyer $2. 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 






LUNN'S PRACTICAL POTTERY 

for 

ART TEACHERS AND STUDENTS 

2 volumes with about one hundred illustrations 
$4.00 postpaid. 



These volumes sold separately for $2.15 each postpaid. 



KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO. 
SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



Rare Volumes of Keramic Studio Magazine ! 

Volume 9 Loose numbers complete 
2 sets only $3.50 each 

Volume 12 Loose numbers complete 
2 sets only $4.00 each 

VERY RARE! 

Volumes 1, 3 and 4 Loose numbers complete 

1 set each $3.50 each 



BOUND VOLUMES $5.00 EACH! 

In volumes 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 

Express or postpaid 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO., SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

When writing to advertisers please mention this magazine 




CONVENTIONAL FLOWER MOTIFS— VERA STONE 



SEPTEM BER 1917 
KERAMIC STUDIO 



COPYRIGHT 1917 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 

SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



Vol. XIX, No. 5. 



fa AUG 27 191 







SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



September 1917 




F we are not mistaken there are signs 
that the Great War may end sooner 
than military experts have figured, 
probably sometime this fall or early 
winter. Anyway let us hope that it 
will, and let us begin to look at 
conditions, not as they are now, 
but as they are likely to be after 
the war. 
One great, big fact stands out. 
After the war the world will be burdened with an enormous 
debt and heavy taxes.';"] We will not be as badly hurt as the 
Europeans, but we will have our share of the damage to repair. 
This burden cannot now be avoided, but it may be lightened by 
a better organization of business. We must discard our old 
and foolish conception of democracy as a social organization 
in which the individual may do as he pleases, and of business 
as a means of getting the best of the other fellow and filling 
our pockets with his money. The result of this policy is that 
a few have their pockets full, and many barely scratch a living. 
Fortunately the end of the war will mean the beginning 
of a new economic era. Extreme individualism must go. 
The soak-the-public and beat-the-competitor policies must go. 
There must be co-operation, help and good feeling, where 
there was harsh competition, greed and jealousy. This ap- 
plies to small just as well as to big business. It applies to the 
china decorating business as well as to the big industries. 

In the August Keramic Stujdio Miss Reynolds called 
attention to the good results which some Chicago music teachers 
have obtained by forming a co-operative Society to secure 
lessons, instead of following the old method of hunting for 
pupils individually, and she was wondering if china decorators 
could not help each other in some similar way. They cer- 
tainly can do it and should do it. 

We have in mind the establishment of Clubs all over the 
country, in all towns which are important enough to gather 
a substantial number of members. These should be real 
Business Clubs, quite different from the various keramic 
societies in vogue until now. These Societies have done ex- 
cellent work in raising the standard of good decoration and 
should continue this good work. But they are exclusive, 
only the top notchers can get in, and, however invaluable 
their campaign of education in good craftsmanship may be, 
they do not help practically and directly the average china 
painter in her business, in finding a market for her work, in 
buying her supplies, etc. 

The new Clubs should be run on a business basis. They 
should be incorporated so that members will not be individ- 
ually responsible in case of losses. Each new member should 
become a stockholder by the compuulsory purchase of one 
share or more. Annual dues should be substantial enough to 
allow paying a salary to a manager, renting a place for the 
display and sale of china, etc. These details should vary in 
each Club according to conditions and location, and Clubs 
should not be too numerous, as in very small places they would 
not be practical and the smaller the membership would be the 
smaller the chances of success. Decorators in small towns 
should join the Club of a neighboring large town. 

There are innumerable ways in which the Clubs could be 



of benefit to their members, besides helping them to buy sup- 
plies and sell work. One would be to secure at regular intervals 
the services of the best teachers in the country for a short 
period of practical lessons. They could afford to pay these 
teachers well and it would be in the end a saving to members. 
Think of the waste of the present system when a decorator has 
to travel from Florida or Oregon to Chicago or New York to 
get a few high price lessons from a well known teacher, and 
think of the many students who cannot afford this big expense. 

Another point. A strongly organized League of China 
Decorators would have eventually something to say about 
the china which is supplied to its members. Decorators who 
try to do art work, better work than commercial decoration, 
should have the best wares available. In present conditions 
they have the worst. European and Japanese potteries un- 
load on them their seconds which they would not use them- 
selves. American china manufacturers are also willing to let 
you have their seconds which you may find at department 
stores and elsewhere, but they are not interested in making good 
china specially for amateurs. As one china maker told us 
once: "I know that these decorators use a lot of china from 
Europe now, but what do they do with it, where do they sell 
it, I do not see it anywhere, it is not a business." There is 
some truth in that statement. With a substantial organiza- 
tion of their business, china decorators would soon be in a 
position to promote the manufacture of an American china 
having the qualities of the best European wares and free from 
imperfect pieces. Just now the task is hopeless. 

As the motto of the Clubs would be "Help others and you 
will help yourself," they should not confine themselves ex- 
clusively to the interest of their members, they should be in 
touch with each other, each Club being only a cog wheel in 
the general scheme of a Cooperative League of China Decora- 
tors. In order to accomplish this, Keramic Studio would 
gladly open its columns free to the Clubs, for correspondence, 
suggestions, information of all kind about details of manage- 
nemt, business innovations, etc. In exchange for this some 
arrangement should be made which would insure a direct 
and effective support of the Magazine. Keramic Studio 
cannot prosper unless the china business recovers from the 
blow struck by the war and is reorganized on a more efficient 
and businesslike basis than it has been so far. On the other 
hand, although we do not dare to say that the china business 
could not live without Keramic Studio, all will agree that the 
disappearance of the Magazine would be another serious blow 
added to the disorganization caused by the war. Keramic Studio 
needs the china decorators and we are vain enough to say that 
china decorators need Keramic Studio. Let us help each other. 

With the effective support which we think could be given 
Keramic Studio by this scheme of Co-operative Business Clubs, 
it would be possible for us to improve and broaden the Magazine, 
to make it more helpful than it has ever been. We have had for 
a long time many ideas and plans in mind, which the recent de- 
cline in business has nipped in the bud, but which we have not 
given up. However we must first know what conditions will 
be after the war and we must see if the women decorators of 
the country are capable and willing to help revive the business 
by making it more efficient than it was before the war. 

(Continued on page 77) 



76 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




ANITA GRAY CHANDLER - - - p AGE Editor 

7 Edison Avenue. Tufts College, Mass. 



AT THE SIGN 

OF THE 
BRUSH AND PALETTE 

This is Ye Old Art Inn 
where the worker of Arts and 
Crafts may rest a bit and par- 
take of refreshment. 



THE City Art Museum of St. Louis, R. A. Holland, Di- 
rector, is gradually acquiring an unusually good per- 
manent collection of paintings, textiles, tapestries, bronzes, 
ceramics, prints, and furniture. The annual report states 
that it ranks fourth among institutions of its kind in the 
United States. The museum has spent $27,550 for paintings, 
$4943 for prints, $21,263 for bronzes, ceramics, and marbles, 
and $29,701 for other art objects. The attendance has in- 
creased about 32,000 within the last year, indicating that 
people are aware of the benefits to be derived from the in- 
stitution. 

The Worcester Art Museum is exhibiting its recent 
acquisition of eleven Sargent water-colors made in Florida 
last winter. It will continue until October 1. The titles 
are suggestive of the subjects: "Bathers", "Muddy Alliga- 
tors," "The Palms," "Shaded Paths," "Waterlogged Boats," 
"The Pool," "The Basin," "Boats at Anchor," "The Ter- 
race," "The Interior Court," and "The Cloisters." The 
museum has also come into possession of some portraits by 
Thomas Sully, the favorite portrait-painter of Queen Victoria. 
He was born in 1783 and died in 1872. The Boston Museum 
of Fine Arts owns the most popular of all his works, "The 
Torn Hat" which represents a fresh-faced little boy wearing 
a much-the-worse-for-wear hat of yellow straw. The origi- 
nal study for his famous coronation portrait of Queen Victoria, 
the very same we had in our English Histories at High 
School, is now at the Metropolitan, bequeathed several years 
ago by the painter's grandson, Francis T. Sully-Darley. The 
Minneapolis Museum has four of his paintings. 

Mrs. W. B. Thayer has given the nucleus of a collection 
for an art museum to the University of Kansas in memory 
of her husband. The gift is permanent providing the Univer- 
sity secures a suitable gallery for the collection within three 
years. 

Allan G. Newman was awarded the $500 prize for a valor 
medal in the competition held by the National Arts Club. 

Henry Turner Bailey of Boston will begin his duties as 
dean of the Cleveland School of Art in September. 
♦> ♦> •> 

The Minneapolis Institute of Arts is the recipient of a 
most important gift from Charles L. Freer of Detroit. There 



are 178 objects^in the collection, all of great value to the stu- 
dent and art-lover, including a large group of fragments of 
Near Eastern pottery, paintings by Japanese artists with 
dates from the thirteenth to the early nineteenth century, 
Japanese pottery, a number of Syrian, Persian and Indian 
tiles, Chinese jewelry, and a great many Eastern wares which 
illustrate various types of glaze and decoration. 

"Daniel S. Fox of 141 Milk Street, this city, has started 
a nation wide movement to induce artists to save all the old 
paint tubes and other lead and tinfoil for the Red Cross. 
He also urges that sculptors should not throw away their 
lead wire." — The Boston Herald. There's safety in 
saving. 

Louis Raemaekers, the Dutch cartoonist who has gained 
lasting fame in this war, has come to America to work because 
he feels that he can do more good here with his pictures than 
anywhere else. In London he was feted as one of the heroes 
of the war. It is to be expected that his reception here will 
be no less cordial, since his work when exhibited last autumn 
in New York and Boston created a sensation. 




One of the daintiest Japanese types decorated with the cherry blossoms. 
(Courtesy of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts.) 

It has been decided to establish an East Side Art Center 
in New York as a result of the successful exhibition of the 
People's Art Guild held this summer in the Forward building. 

St. George, Staten Island, N. Y. is to have an art museum, 
according to the latest plans, for the local Association of the 
Arts and Sciences. 

Dr. Christian Brinton, the art critic and writer, has been 
given the decoration of a Knight of the Royal Order of Vasa 
by the King of Sweden in recognition of his services in con- 
nection with the recent exhibition of Swedish art. It was 
partly through Dr. Brinton's efforts that the Zuloaga paint- 
ings were brought to America last Fall. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 

The annual exhibition of the Hingham Arts and Crafts 
Society took place this summer in the Episcopal church in 
that quaint and interesting little town. The Society which 
is about sixteen years old, makes an effort to keep alive the 
arts and crafts for which the place was well known a hundred 
years ago. As usual the basketry work was especially good. 



^~J&~~^- 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



77 



MRS. HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST - Page Editor 

2298 Commonwealth Ave., St. Paul, Minn. 

VEGETABLE MARROW MOTIFS 

THE drawings and units shown this month are of the vege- 
table marrow — a variety of gourd, or squash as they 
are known in this Country. The flowers, fruit and leaves are 
extremely decorative suggesting endless possibilities for design. 
The color of the flower is yellow or bright orange. The calyx 
or embryo gourd is at this stage of course green, but the natural 
coloring need not be a limitation when using a convention- 
alized drawing for decoration. Either of the two drawings is 
so formal that any color scheme may be used. These units 
may be adapted to almost any use by enlarging or reducing 
and repeating either with or without connecting bands or 
abstract lines. They can be treated flat with outlines or 
in relief according to the demands or logic of the situation, 
the use to which they are to be put. These things can be 
left to the individual choice. The things which count are the 
drawing, the technique and the proper placement. 

(Continued from Editorial page) 

We think it can be done, and with this in mind we are 
launching the idea of the new "Business Clubs." What do 



you think of it? Write to us, we will publish all suggestions 
and comments which will seem to us valuable. 

We would like especially to receive ideas and suggestions 
on the following two points : 

1. How should the capital be raised which is absolutely 
necessary to insure the growth and development of the Clubs? 
What should be the annual contribution in a Club of, say, 100 
members? 

2. How could the Clubs give a direct and effective sup- 
port to Keramic Studiol In what way could the Magazine 
be of most benefit to the Clubs and how could the Clubs help 
best to support it? In late years it has become more and 
more the habit of decorators to avoid subscribing by using 
the copy at the Library or at their teacher's studio. If carried 
much further this shortsighted policy means the ultimate 
disappearance of the Magazine. How can this evil feature 
be best remedied? 

» K 

We think that our readers will be interested in the simple 
and effective designs by Miss Vera Stone of Garden City, 
Kansas. Miss Stone is not a china decorator and the treat- 
ments for her designs were written by Miss Jessie Bard. These 
simple and graceful borders may be adapted in all kinds of ways 
to the decoration of both china and glass. For glass especially 
they will be found far more effective than elaborate designs. 




\_^!^<^>»'c^^7^ sM '^^^^' a **^~^ 



■'/ 



VEGETABLE MARROW MOTIFS— HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST 



n 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



I 


1 

1 


\ 



THE LINEN PAGE. 

JETTA EHLERS ------ Page Editor 

18 East Kinney Street, Newark, N. J. 

SUGGESTIONS FOR THE COMING SEASON 

MOST of us are perfectly willing to relax during the sum- 
mer months, and consequently there is little doing in 
the studios. It makes it somewhat difficult to give anything 
fresh for the linen page this month because of this condition, 
With the passing of summer and the near advent of the fall 
season one begins to look ahead and make plans, and so per- 
haps it will be well for us to do a little planning. One sug- 
gestion made is that our readers plan at this time one definite 
piece of work for the coming season. 

For instance, plan a luncheon service, carrying through 
in all detail the china, linen, glass, arrangement of flowers, 
candles, etc. Much thought will be needed in the selection 
of an appropriate design for the china, and the color scheme. 
Then the careful study of its background, the linen. 

It will take considerable experimenting to decide on 
just the proper texture of the linen, the embellishment of it, 
and the shape and number of pieces required. Here too 
enters the question of the table and chairs. In the breakfast- 
room of a charming country home, is a set which is full of 
suggestion. The table is of the drop-leaf variety and the 
chairs a good simple shape, the seats of wood. 

The set is painted a deep cream color. Quaint baskets 
of flowers, the baskets old blue, form the decoration. These 
are placed in an interesting way on the table just above the 
plate doilies, the table being arranged for four. The design 
on the chairs is placed on the broad piece which forms the top 
of the back. A sideboard has the same basket painted on 
the drawers. The whole thing is a fine illustration of what 
can be done in creating beauty with simple means. Then 
the table accessories, the candles, if used, or the flowers or 
fruit, small side dishes etc, must be considered. The most 
perfect table could be spoiled if these things were not har- 
monious, so this end of the problem must be well thought out. 



With such a set planned, one has work for a large part of the 
season laid out. 

The beauty of working out a set of this kind is that one 
is moving along a definite line. The variety of interest which 
enters into the problem is another factor. With the accom- 
plishment of the task the worker will have a really big thing 
to show. Contrast this with the same amount of energy 
expended on a lot of little things, and one can quickly see the 
value of the other plan. Sets may be built up in various 
ways. You may have a specially nice piece of linen which 
you want to use, and make that your starting point. Or it 
may be some quaint piece of glass, or a fine old comport or 
flower basket. It really does not matter where you begin, 
so long as you keep always before you the thing as a whole, 
the relation of each part to the rest of the scheme. 

An interesting problem would be to plan a child's set. 
This could include small table and cunning chair, or a high 
chair with tray. All sorts of fascinating linen things might 
be planned to go with it. 

A child's apron, on original lines, various sorts of bibs, 
tray cloth napkins, even a wee table cloth and napkins. The 
dishes might be made up largely of the yellow kitchen ware. 
Surely nothing could be nicer for a bowl of bread and milk 
than a nice yellow bowl, with a jolly little duckling, of course 
a very conventional duckling adorning it. 

Sets for afternoon tea and for evening spreads, such as 
a Welsh Rarebit set, offer opportunities for the decorator. 
The point is, that if you concentrate upon some special service, 
you really are accomplishing far more than in working along 
in an aimless sort of fashion. Then too, it is a wise thing for 
the professional, with possible exhibitions ahead, to make 
out some special problem. 

It is equally to the advantage of the worker who has 
only her home to consider. There are always social ob- 
ligations to be met, and a beautifully planned table goes a 
long way towards the success of the dinners, luncheons, and 
suppers, with which the average housekeeper pays many of 
her social debts. This may seem far removed from the linen 
page, but we have transgressed so many times we no longer 
apologize. All these things are so bound up in each other that 
it is impossible to keep strictly to linen. Our linen chat this 
month has to do with the illustration, which shows a cloth 
spoken of specially in the August magazine. It is made of 
peach colored linen with wide appliqued border of ivory 
linen. The particular feature of it is the tassels which 
ornament the corners. The printer jumbled things a bit 
when he printed it as "round silvered brilliant molds." 
They are round wooden button molds, an inch across, which 
form the foundation. These were silvered and then worked 
over with peace embroidery silk. This made it possible to 
sew one part of the snap fastener to the back. The rest of 
the tassel was strung on embroidery silk, a tiny round button 
mold forming the end. Next is an oblong coral bead, then 
two small round button molds, a large oval coral bead and one 
small round button mold completes the tassel. This is fas- 
tened to the large round button, the whole being about three 
inches in length. These can be removed by means of the 
snap fasteners when the cloth is laundered. I am sorry that 
the illustration is not large enough to show the detail of it. 
There is a great fancy for all sorts of artistic tassels at present. 
This is influenced by the fad for the "Chinese" which is play- 
ing a leading role in interior decoration just now. 

One sees perfectly gorgeous tassels on Chinese bird cages, 
hanging baskets, on window draperies and for countless other 
purposes. The button molds may be painted with enamelite 
in brilliant colors, and combined with gilt and silvered ones, 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



79 



or with beads of coral, amber, lapiz, or other stones. Heavy 
embroidery silk is used for the tassel in combination wiih 
these. A stunning one was made up of blue and violet and 
silver molds. This strung on heavy black silk and finished 
with a tassel of the black mixed with violet and blue. This 
particular one was designed to hang from the corners of a 
curtain valance. 

I have described these things in the hope that some of 
our readers may want to experiment. In one of the recent 
exhibitions a very handsome tassel, all of soft pastel colorings, 
was attached to the handle of a serving tray. 

Another feature of the cloth in the illustration is the plac- 
ing of the little block printed border design just above the 
applique. The small napkins treated in this way were lovely. 

This set was designed and executed by Miss Ethel Wing 
of the Newark Keramic Society. 

Here is hoping that the season to come may be one full 
of progress and real artistic growth for us all. 



KATHRYN E. CHERRY - 

Marina Building, St. Louis, Mo. 



Page Editor 



POWDER BOX 

IF Satsuma box, all of the black lines, black bands, hat, are 
done in Azure Blue enamel. The flowers are Jersey Cream, 
The face and wide band is Grey Violet, buds Wistaria, scarf 
is Silver Grey, leaves Aquamarine. 

If box is china (French), oil and dust bands in Dark Blue 
for Dusting also the outlining around flowers, the hat, dress, 
and lines, fire. 

Second Fire — Dust face and wide band with Pearl Grey. 
The flowers with Glaze for Green. The scarf with Glaze for 
Blue. 

Third Fire — Oil the entire box, pad very dry, dust with 
1 Ivory Glaze and 1 Glaze for Blue. 




POWDER BOX— KATHRYN E. CHERRY 



80 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



MAUD M. MASON - Page Editor 

218 West 59th Street, New York City 



FLORAL TILE IN SOFT RELIEF ENAMELS 

WHEREVER black is introduced use Black Enamel. For 
the flower use equal parts of Soft Yellow and Citron 
Yellow. For the grey tones in the leaves use equal parts of 
Soft Yellow and Leaf Green. For the grey around the center 
of flower use equal parts of Madder and White. Old Blue may 
be substituted for the black in the leaves. For the light spaces 
in the leaves also the light band of the border use equal parts 
of Soft Yellow and Ochre. If the design should be repeated 
to form a facing of a fireplace or the bottom of a tray, omit 
the black edge and carry the green tone the full width of edge. 



STUDIO NOTE 

Mr. Coover, now on a trip to Pacific Coast cities, finds 
a growing interest in enamel painting on Satsuma and Ameri- 
can wares, also enamel on glassware. These, together with 



the increased interest in water color painting carries the teach- 
ers through this year with good classes and order work. Mrs. 
A. E. Wright, demonstrator for the Coover studios, spent the 
month of August in various cities of Wisconsin. 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

A Subscriber — I decorated a Satsuma bowl with Mason's Enamels. After 
it was finished I put it in Black Tea to bring out the crackle, (/ learned to do this 
through your magazine). It took a long time to do this although the tea teas strong, 
however at last the crackle was brought out but it spoiled the paint more or less, 
the lea is deposited on the enamels making it dull and irregular looking. I tried 
to wash it off but can't do anything with it. In some places the color is changed 
entirely and in some places the black outline is eaten away. 

The length of time for this work depends on the strength of tea and the 
tone you wish to obtain. It will soften all the colors a little but should not 
change them if the tea is applied properly. The tea leaves should be put in a 
bag while boiling and then removed when you put the Satsuma in. If a deep 
tone is desired, place the ware in it, bring it to a boil and then let it remain in 
the tea over night. It becomes darker after standing a day or two, the piece 
should be entirely covered with the tea or it will leave a mark where the ware 
is exposed. It should not have eaten away the black outline. Possibly you 
did not fire it before putting into the tea or it may not have been fired hot 
enough. The only way to remove the tea is by firing it again, 




FLORAL TILE— MAUD M. MASON 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



81 




UNIT OF DECORATION IN TEA SET 
MRS. VERNIE LOCKWOOD WILLIAMS - Page Editor 

University of Pittsburg. Home Studio, 52 W. Maiden St., Washington, Pa. 

JAPANESE TEA SET 

THE motifs taken for this occult design were different 
flowers, the smaller design being used for all pieces, 
except the plates on which the larger design was used. The 




band on all pieces is composed of four smaller ones, Black, 
Yellow-brown or Cafe-au-lait, Blue and White. All outlines 
are black being applied with brush. The color scheme may, 
of course, be optional, but the one used in this instance was 
Cherry's enamels selected to harmonize with the wistaria 
color of the porcelain. The background of design was dark 
blue; concentric circles were yellow, Leaf Green, yellow, blue 
and Cafe-au-lait. The white spaces were white enamel; light 
grey tones Leaf Green; medium grey tones, Cafe-au-lait; 
narrow bands on all handles are Black. The tray used was 
Japanese painted with dead black Japalac. The round tray 
cover and serviettes were wistaria linen, 16 inches square, with 
2 inch band, cut from a 16 inch square, to avoid turning corners, 
of cafe-au-lait or yellow-brown, and with one-eighth inch 
piping of yellow on inside edge. Flowers used were our com- 
mon field daisies. 




UNIT OF DECORATION IN TEA SET 

If *• 

DESIGN CONTESTS 



JAPANESE TEA SET 



NEW YORK CONTEST 

An exhibition of designs, suitable for textile fabrics, wall 
paper and ceramics, will be held in the American museum of 
Natural History, from December 17 to 31, 1917, inclusive. 

From one to three designs may be entered by a student 
from any art or public school. Any medium may be used. 

Designs must be inspired by some exhibit in the Museum 
and the source of inspiration written on the back (example: 
Peruvian textile, Mexican pottery, etc.). 

Designs must be received on or before December 10. 
Name and address should be written on back to insure de- 
livery to owner after exhibition. 

No Prizes will be given. All the designs submitted will 
be passed upon by a committee, and such as meet its approval 
will be placed on exhibition. 

For particulars apply to Mr. Charles W. Mead, American 

Museum of Natural History, 77th St. and Central Park, New 

York. 

KYOTO CONTEST 

A design exhibition will be held in the Kyoto Commercial 
Museum in October, 1917. 

Designers of all kinds of craftswork may exhibit. Besides 
the designs they may send the actual goods, if they choose. 

No limitation about the subject of the design, the kind of 
paper or the size of the sheet. 

Prizes:— One Grand Prix Medal, two Gold Medals, Three 
Silver Medals, seven Copper Medals and some diplomas. 

In last year's exhibition three American women were 



82 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



awarded prizes: Gold Medal to Miss Esther M. Mattson, 
Brooklyn; Silver Medal and Diploma to Mrs. F. R. Weisskopf, 
Milwaukee, Wis.; Copper Medal to Miss Dorothy Baronidis, 
San Francisco. 

The best designs among the exhibits will be published in 
a book. Designs winning prizes will not be returned, others 
will be returned if postage has been paid. 

Exhibits should reach the Museum not later than Sept. 30. 

COUNTY FAIR EXHIBIT 

There will be in October at Knoxville, Tenn., a County 
Fair in which the following prizes will be given for decorated 
china and pottery: 

$15 for best collection of china (not over 25 pieces). 

$7.50 for best piece in conventional design. 

$2.50 for best piece in naturalistic design. 

$10 for best collection of pottery. 

$5 for best piece of pottery. 

For further particulars address Mrs. Frank Fowler, 
Kingston Pike, Knoxville, Tenn. 

FALL EXHIBITION NOTES 

The Art Alliance of America will hold in its New York 
Gallery an exhibition of handicrafts, lasting from November 
17 th to December 8th. This is open to all, subject to jury ex- 
amination. Good exhibits of decorated china and of pottery 
should be one of the features of the exhibition. 

Before this, from October 11th to October 15th, there 
will be an exhibition of textile designs, under the auspices of 
"Women's Wear," which will award prizes totaling $500.00, as 
follows: first prize $250, others $125, $100 and $25. A special 
prize of $50 will be given by Burton Bros. & Co. for the best 
design applicable to cotton goods for women's wear. 

Later, on December 5th and 6th, there will be an exhibit 
of the designs submitted for a contest with prizes offered by 
"Vanity Fair," for a cover design suitable for its Spring or 
Summer numbers. The prizes will be $100, $50 and $25. 

For particulars apply to the Art Alliance of America, 10 
E. 47th street, New York. 




WALTER K. TITZE - 

210 Fuller Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. 



Page Editor 



BELLEEK BOWL 

OIL entire bowl with Special Dusting Medium and dust with 
Lavender Glaze 4 parts and Mode 1 part; fire. Second 
working- — Trace in design ; all black lines and bands are un- 
fluxed gold, same with circles in panels. Apply unfluxed gold 
lightly and repeat. Work in violet motif: Light violets, Deep 
Blue Green and Violet; medium and dark violets with Violet 
and Ruby; leaves with Yellow Green shaded with Brown 
Green and Shading Green; fire. Third working- — Dust upper 
and lower part of bowl with 1 part Mode and 1 part Glaze for 
Blue; retouch gold and flowers. 




KERAMIC STUDIO 



83 



MAY E. REYNOLDS ------ Page Editor 

116 Auditorium Building, Chicago, 111. 



CUP AND SAUCER 

FIRST Fire — Outline the design in ink that fires in, if desired. 
Paint in chrysanthemums : for the yellow flower use Yellow 
Brown for center, Egg Yellow and Yellow Brown for the dark 
shadows, and Lemon and Albert Yellow for the light tone near 
edges of petals. Reddish Chrysanthemum in Blood Red, 
Violet of Iron, and a touch of Violet; Egg Yellow and Hair Brown 
for the yellow tones near the center of the flower; also a light 
wash of Ivory Glaze in the lightest part, the Ivory Glaze used 
must have a pinkish sunny tone. White chrysanthemum in 
Yellow Brown for center, light wash of Yellow Green and Moss 
Green in shadows parts, with Trenton Ivory, this tone should 
be a real ivory, also a little Ivory Glaze. Leaves in Moss 
Green, Yellow Green, Russian Green, Brown Green, Dark 
Green, Grass Green, and Empire Green. Stems and veins in 
Brown Green, Dark Green, and Finishing Brown. 

Background: Palest tone is Trenton Ivory, Lemon 
Yellow, and Albert Yellow, with Yellow Brown for the shadows. 
Baby Blue, Blue Green Glaze, and Russian Green for the sky 
tones leading up to white chrysanthemum; shadows and dark 
tones near flower are Dark Green, Finishing Brown, Brown 
Green, Grass Green, with a wash of Moss Green. Yellow Green, 
Empire Green and Trenton Ivory for pale lights. Use Copen- 
hagen Grey, a little Violet, and Grey Glaze for the grey tone 
near reddish chrysanthemum, with Finishing Brown and Brown 



Green for the dark shadows. Lay in gold in bands and design. 
Second Fire — Go over. the flowers with same tones used 
in first fire; strenghten leaves, veins and stems; dust over parts, 
where shadowy effect is desired, with same colors used in paint- 
ing; use a little Blue Green Glaze for dusting blue tones, and 
Ivory Glaze for sunny effect; dust Ivory Glaze over ivory tones. 
Same colors can be used in painting cup. The dark chrysanthe- 
mum on cup is done in the reddish tones. 





CUP AND SAUCER— MAY E. REYNOLDS 



84 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



COLOR STUDY— VERA STONE 

Treatments by Jessie M. Bard 
NO. 1— MOTIF IN UPPER LEFT HAND CORNER 

TO be oiled and dusted. The dark green is 4 parts Water 
Lily Green and 1 part Water Blue. The light grey 
green is Water Lily Green, the brightest green is Bright Green, 
dark blue is Water Blue, the light blue is Grey Blue, the yellow 
is Yellow for Dusting, and the red center is painted with Yellow 
Brown and a little Yellow Red. 

NO. 2— MOTIF IN UPPER RIGHT HAND CORNER 

For enamels. Dark calyx Pompeian Red. Light calyx 
Marion Grey and a little Warm Grey. Dark flower is Mul- 
berry. Violet flowers are Grey Violet. Lightest flowers are 
3 Citron and 1 White. Small leaves are Grass Green. Large 
bright leaves are 4 Peacock Green, 1 Blue Green, 2 White. 
Light leaves are Sand. 

NO. 3— PLATE BORDER 

To be oiled and dusted. Deep purple is Mode and a little 
Deep Purple. Dark lavender is Mode dusted on heavy and 
light lavender is 2 Mode and 1 Ivory Glaze oiled lightly. Dark 
blue is 2 Water Blue, § Banding Blue, 2 Ivory Glaze. Light 
blue is Glaze for Blue. Green leaves under center design are 
Water Lily Green. Light part of turned over leaf 3 Yellow 
for Dusting and 1 Dove Grey and dark part is Dove Grey and 
a little Hair Brown or Dark Brown. Large light leaves are 3 
Pearl Grey and | Mode. Background is 1 Dove Grey, 1 Ivory 
Glaze, | part Brown Green. 

NO. 4— BERRY MOTIF 

To be painted. Brightest berries are Carnation. Dark 
red ones are Blood Red and a little Ruby, Light red is Yellow 
Brown and a little Blood Red. Dark yellow tone is Yellow 
Brown, a little Dark Brown and Dark Grey. Light yellow is 
Albert Yellow. Dark blue leaves are Copenhagen Blue and 
Banding Blue. Light blue leaves are Deep Blue Green, Apple 
Green and a little Copenhagen Blue. Grey leaves are Brown 
Green and Dark Grey. 

NO. 5 MOTIF 

To be oiled and dusted. Dark blue flowers are 1 Water 
Green, 1 Ivory Glaze. Light blue is Grey Blue. Stems are 3 
Water Lily Green, 1 Dark Grey, 3 Ivory Glaze. Large flower 
is Deep Ivory. Red centers are painted with 1 Yellow Red, 
2 Yellow Brown. Centers of blue flowers are Yellow Brown. 
NO. 6 MOTIF 

To be oiled and dusted. Dark leaves are Water Lily 
Green. Light leaves are Florentine Green oiled lightly. Green 
in flowers is 2 Florentine Green, § Brown Green. Dark yellow 
is 1 part Albert Yellow and 2 parts Ivory Glaze. Light yellow 
is Yellow for Dusting. 

NO. 7— BORDER 

To be oiled and dusted. Deepest red is Mode and a little 
Deep Purple, deepest purple is Mode and a little Violet. Light 
lavender is Mode. The largest fruit is Mode and a touch of 
Blood Red. Yellow fruit is Deep Ivory. Stems are 2 Pearl 
Grey and 1 Water Blue. Dark bands are Water Lily Green. 
Light green background 3 Pearl Grey and 1 Florentine Green. 
Blue background is 1 Glaze for Blue, 1-5 Mode, 1 Ivory Glaze. 
No. 8— BORDER 

Oiled and dusted. Dark blue is Water Blue, light blue 
is Grey Blue, grey tone is Dove Grey. 

NO. 9— BORDER 

Dark red is Cameo and a little Blood Red. Pink is 1 
Cameo and § Peach Blossom. Bright leaf is 1 Bright green 
and 1 Ivory Glaze. Brown leaf is Dove Grey and a little 
Brown Green. Small leaf is Deep Ivory and a little Dark Grey. 
Retangle between motifs is Cameo. 



NO. 10— BORDER 

To be dusted. Dark circle is Mode, dark brown stem is 
Cameo and a pinch of Dark Brown. Flower is 1 part Cameo 
and 2 Peach Blossom. Leaves are 1 Dove Grey, 1 Ivory Glaze 
and a little Florentine Green. Wipe out place for line in leaf. 

Second Fire — Paint the reds to the tone that is required 
and paint line in leaf with Yellow Green and Shading Green. 
NO. H— BORDER 

To be dusted. Oil greens and dust with Water Lily Green. 
Oil yellows and dust with 1 Albert Yellow and 3 Ivory Glaze. 

Second Fire— Shade yellow with Blood Red and Yellow 
Brown. 




VASE, NO. 4 MOTIF, COLOR STUDY— VERA STONE 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



85 





NO. 12 MOTIF, COLOR STUDY— VERA STONE 



NO. II MOTIF, COLOR STUDY— VERA STONE 




PLATE, NO. 3^MOTIF, COLOR STUDY— VERA STONE 



86 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




PLATE, NO. 2 MOTIF, COLOR STUDY— VERA STONE 




PLATE, NO. 6 MOTIF, COLOR STUDY— VERA STONE 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



87 



-4 






PLATE, NO. I MOTIF, COLOR STUDY— VERA STONE 




PLATE, NO. 7 MOTIF, COLOR STUDY— VERA STONE 



88 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




TEA SET— VERA STONE 



(Treatment page 89) 




PLATE BORDER— VERA STONE 



(Treatment page 89) 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



89 



PLATE BORDER— (Page 



Vera Stone 



OUTLINE is Gold. A band of gold and also the stems. 
Petals around the circles are Grey Blue and those in the 
background are Water Blue. Circles are painted with Albert 
Yellow. The space between the design and edge of plate is 
painted with a thin wash of Dark Grey and a very little Grey 
Blue. 



TEA SET— (Page 88) 

Vera Stone 
leaves and the small 
Oil 

flower and dust with Yellow for Dusting. Paint centers of 
flowers with Yellow Brown and a little Yellow Red. Bands 
are Gold. 



OUTLINE is to be omitted. Oil 
squares in bands and dust with Florentine Green. 




TEA SET— VERA STONE 



P>AINT light green with Yellow Green, a little Shading Green 
■t and Dark Grey. Paint blue outline with equal parts 
Banding Blue and Copenhagen Blue. 

Second Fire— Oil leaves and dust with Florentine Green, 
oil the dark blue spaces and dust with Water Blue, the large 



flowers with Yellow for Dusting, the light bud is dusted with 
Mode very lightly. The space between design and edge of 
pieces may be painted with 5 parts Dark Grey and 2 Apple 
Green. 



90 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



BEGINNERS' CORNER 

JESSIE M. BARD - Page Editor 
Dickinson Seminary, Williamsport, Pa. 

PLATE 

Hallie Day 

OIL the wide band and the large 
part of main figure and dust 
with Water Blue. The smaller sec- 
tions in main design are oiled and 
dusted with Grey Blue. Small ob- 
long between sections is oiled and 
dusted with 2 parts Ivory Glaze, 1 
part Yellow Brown. Fine lines are 
Green Gold. Do not have the outer 
band come quite to the edge of the 
plate. Any band is more interesting 
if it does not go over the edge of the 
china for it makes the china look 
heavy. 

Second Fire — Paint over the 
small oblong with a thin wash of 
2 parts Yellow Brown and 1 part 
Yellow Red. Retouch Gold. 







PLATE— HALLIE DAY 







SJ*. 





NO- 5 MOTIF, COLOR STUDY 

BORDERS, NOS. 8, 9, 10, U MOTIFS, COLOR STUDY— VERA STONE 





Book of 
Cups *2? Saucers 




COPYWeWTfiO l»j» 

KSBAWC STCKO FUBL5XWNG CO. 

3YRACWSE. NEW tobb 



A REMARKABLE BOOK OFFER! 

Subject to change without notice ! 
50 per cent Discount on the Following: 

Regular Price. 

Class Room No. 1. Art of Teaching, etc., $3.00 

" No. 2. Flower Painting, etc., 3.00 

" No. 3. Figure Painting, etc., 3.00 

" No. 4. Conventional Decoration, etc. 3.00 
Little Things to Make, 3SMo£ SSfft $fo n o 2.00 

Book of Cups and Saucers, 1 .50 

THIS IS AN OPPORTUNITY 
OPEN TO ALL SUBSCRIBERS OF KERAMIC STUDIO. 

NOTE.«Many are taking advantage of these prices. 
Why not you ? Do not wait another day ! 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO., SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



it 



Cf 



§c 



A 







The entire contents of this Magazine are covered by the general copyright and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 



CONTENTS OF OCTOBER, 1917 







Page 


Editorial 




91 


At the Sign of the Brush and Palette 


Anita Gray Chandler 


92 


Snap Dragon (Color Study) 


Lucy M. Shover 


92 


Tile for Book Ends, etc. 


Mrs. Henrietta Barclay Paist 


93 


Enamels on Sedji 


Kathryn E. Cherry 


94 


Fruit Dish 


Mrs, Vernie Lockwood Williams 


95 


Work of Pupils in the Fawcett School of Industrial Art, 






Newark, N. J. 


Miss Maud M. Mason, Instructor 


96-98 


Glass Decoration 


Marie A. Frick 


98 


Answers to Correspondents 




98 


Plates 


J. 0. Balda 


99, 101 


Beginner's Corner 


Jessie M. Bard 


100 


Pjate Design 


Vera Stone 


100 


Cup and Saucer 


Syvilla Fister 


101 


The Linen Page 


Jetta Ehlers 


102 


Bowl 


Mary L. Brigham 


103 


Candlestick 


May E. Reynolds- Judson 


104 


Firing 


Mrs. Harry 0. Jones 


104 


Four Designs for Plates 


Adeline More 


105 


Vase, Japanese Figures 


Walter K. Titze 


106 




THE OLD RELIABLE 

FITCH KILNS 



'T'HESE KILNS have been in successful use 
for over 40 years and are today known for 

the excellence of the firing results as well as their 

low first production 
cost — low firing cost 
and low cost for up- 
keep and repairs. 




We will send circulars and 

prices promptly 

on request. 



GAS KILN, 2 Sizes. 



STEARNS FITCH & CO., 
SPRINGFIELD, OHIO. 

1875—1817 



THE CHERRY COLORS 

Colors for Painting and Tinting 
Special Colors for Dusting 

THE MOST POPULAR ENAMELS 
ON T HE MA RKET 

Send for Complete Price List 
The Robineau Pottery, Syracuse, N. Y. 



GLASS COLORS ! 

GOLD AND SILVER 
FOR GLASS 



Send for List 



The Robineau Pottery, Syracuse, N. Y. 



"When writing to advertisers please mention this magazine 




SNAPDRAGON — LUCY MAIE SHOVER 



OCTOBER 1917 
KERAMIC STUDIO 



KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 



Vol. XIX, No. 6. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



October 1917 




E publish below a letter from Albert 
Heckman which we think will in- 
terest a great number of our read- 
ers. We are pleased to say that 
Mr. Heckman has since sent us 
some interesting articles with ex- 
cellent designs specially made for 
textiles, but which will be valuable 
to china decorators and other crafts 
workers. This letter as well as 
the letter of Mrs. Leah Rodman Tubby also published below 
and many similar letters show us unmistakably that there is a 
demand for a broadening of the Magazine, but on the other 
hand there is a large class of decorators, a very large class, 
whose opinions are condensed in the following letter just re- 
ceived from an Indiana subscriber: "I am losing interest in 
Keramic Studio simply because it is becoming an uninterest- 
ing Magazine. It is high priced and so few interesting things 
in it. If we are paying for a china Magazine, why does linen, 
advertising pages and so many pages of ancient pottery and 
exhibits take up so much space, when the space is needed for 
more naturalistic work and good reading instructions." 

We have for nineteen years tried to please both classes of 
decorators in the same Magazine. The task is probably hope- 
less, and the solution of the problem lies in another direction, 
but that will be the subject of our next editorial. 

Meadville, Pa., July 10, 1917. 
Mr. S. Robineau, Syracuse, N. Y., 

Dear Mr. Robineau, — I am going to take a few minutes to answer your 
request for suggestions about the Keramic Studio. I know somewhat how 
you feel about the trend of the china business for I have been acquainted 
with it for a number of years. We all know that much of the old style of 
decoration which any amateur could do has gone perhaps never to return. 
Arid we are content that it should. However, we want something infinitely 
better to take its place. I firmly believe something will. It is probable 
that there will be fewer decorators who will turn out, on the whole, a better 
class of work. And consequently you may have a more limited number of 
readers who will want only the best work. I may be mistaken but that is 
ray candid opinion. 

Personally I wish you could reach a more unlimited class and give 
work of a broader nature. There are many more teachers in Art, Normal and 
High Schools as well as no end of students who would use your magazine if in 
some way you could give them what they need and want. 

We have practically no magazine which treats the applied arts in a prac- 
tical technical sense. 

There is room for so much growth along all the branches of the applied 
arts. What is true of ceramics is true of textiles. We have only to compare 
some of our work with that of the schools of Budapest, Vienna and Munich 
to feel it. This war is bringing out our latent possibilities and in the end we 
will be the better for it. 

Some articles on the subject of design in the Art, Normal and High 
Schools with comments and photographs of that work would naturally in- 
terest the teachers and pupils of those schools. And some contributions 
showing how ceramic motifs could be developed into textile and other designs 
would not only interest the china painters but all the others. Designs for 
decorative pages, for book covers, for end pieces, for Christmas cards, etc., 
would interest many. Many china painters woidd be glad to broaden their 
field I am sure. Last winter I received fourth prize in a textile competition 
in which 1,247 designs were submitted from 16 different States and I attribute 
it to my study of ceramic design under Mrs. Cherry. Surely it goes without 
saying that the china painter can profit by studying some of the allied arts, 
and if you brought out this point some of them who only think of so many 
new designs to copy each month would not resent the presence of other work. 

At the recent exhibition by the New York Society I noticed that many of 
the visitors were more interested in the linens displayed than in the china. 
I see no reason why one should not take advantage of this interest. 



Miss Mason's class work is always interesting and it is of a broader 
nature than just ceramics, I believe. The work you showed seme time ago 
by Hugo B. Froehlich was excellent, and the short series of lessons by Care hue 
Hoffman of Pratt Institute was by far the best of its kind you ever published. 
It would bear reprinting. 

ALBERT W. HECKMAN 
» » 

Mrs. Leah Rodman Tubby whose designs are familiar 
to subscribers of former Keramic Studios writes to us that she 
is establishing a studio in Los Angeles. We wish her success 
in her new home. She writes among other things: 

"I was delighted to see the suggestion in the last issue concerning work- 
ing Clubs. That has been my idea for a long time but I have not been in 
one place long enough to formulate such an idea. I expect to make this my 
home and I find that there is no real business in china decoration here. There 
seems to be no Keramic Society, not even an Arts & Crafts Society' for the 
furtherance of the crafts. I am keenly anxious to ''start something" and 
intend to, as soon as I am able to. This is a hustling city and ought to sup- 
port the Arts in a big way. 

Keramic Studio is certainly on the high road to perfection and should 
be hslped in every way. I was especially pleased to note that Keramic 
Studio is used for other purposes in design than for china. While in one of 
the shops here I heard a lady say she would take a copy, as she felt she would 
more than get her money's worth in designs, though she was not a china dec- 
orator. I was curious, so I asked her if she would mind telling me what use 
she found for the designs. She said they were always so good she felt safe 
to use them for all kinds of craftswork. The copy happened to have one of 
my designs in it, so of course I was duly pleased." 
H H 

Some time ago we predicted in this Magazine that glass 
decoration would become an important feature of the work 
of amateur decorators in this country. We might say that 
this prediction is already realized, as it is evident from the 
correspondence we are receiving that the interest in this kind 
of work is almost general and bound to grow rapidly. 

It has just now the great advantage over china that glass 
shapes manufactured in this country are on the market. It 
is only a question of a very short time when all dealers will 
have them. And it is not a temporary fad. As one dealer 
wrote to us some time ago, it is safe to predict that it will 
become permanently for the amateur workers of this country 
as important a branch of decoration as china painting. Glass 
like china must be renewed constantly and the demand is 
enormous. The decorative work by the factories is generally 
inferior and there is room for artistic, individual work. 

As we have said before, we will be glad to have designs 
and treatments for glass submitted to us, although Keramic 
Studio is already full of china designs which may as well be 
applied to glass. In order to encourage the work we will 
open a design competition with prizes as follows: 

Competition will close on November 15th, 1917. De- 
signs should be applied to any of the shapes from the United 
States Glass Co. or the Cambridge Glass Works, which have 
been published in August number (Page 67). 

Designs should be sent flat, with name and address of 
designer on back. They should be in black and white, ac- 
companied with a color sketch of one section of the design, if 
the design is conventional or a written treatment in glass 
colors. 

Competition is open to all, whether glass decorators or 
not. First Prize, $10; Second Prize, $5. 

Good designs which will not be awarded prizes will be 
purchased. 



92 



KERAMIG STUDIO 



ANITA GRAY CHANDLER 

7 Edison Avenue. Tufts College, Mass. 



Page Editor 







AT THE SIGN 

OF THE 
BRUSH AND PALETTE 

This is Ye Old Art Inn 
where the worker of Arts and 
Crafts may rest a bit and par- 
take of refreshment. 



IN recognition of the 20th and 50th anniversaries of the 
Boston Society of Arts and Crafts and the Boston Society 
of Architects respectively, a joint exhibition will be held during 
November next, in Boston. An announcement made by Mr. 
Louis C. Newhall, chairman of the exhibition committee of 
the Arts and Crafts Society, gives the following information: 
"A large room will be devoted exclusively to the work of our 
society, and all branches of craft work are invited. It is hoped 
that work of a very high standard may be shown. The very 
fact that our country is at war and virtually cut off from the 
industrial products of Europe makes it all the more desirable 
to hold exhibitions showing what America can do in the indus- 
trial arts. Our craftsmen are urged to begin at once on the 
preparation of exhibits which shall be worthy of this extra- 
ordinary occasion." 



During the month of October there will be two interesting- 
exhibitions at the gallery of the Society of Arts and Crafts at 
No. 9 Park Street, Boston; the first, a display of artistic needle- 
work from October 9 to November 6, and the second, an exhibit 
of photographs by members of the photographers' guild of the 
Society from October 24 to November 6. Entries for the latter 
will be received until October 22. 



It has been reported upon good foundation that John Sing- 
er Sargent has been asked to decorate the rotunda of the Boston 
Museum of Fine Arts. Mrs. John L. Gardner, whose Venetian 
palace in the Fenway is such a well-known treasure-house of 
art, and Dr. Denman W. Ross, who has given priceless porce- 
lains to the museum within the last year, are known to be es- 
pecially interested in the project. It is said that Mr. Sargent 
has had great difficulty in securing a studio large enough to 
properly accommodate the proposed work. Boston will be 
unusually fortunate if she is to acquire another group of murals 
equal in magnificence to those in the Public Library. 



Fifty young American artists were encamped this past 
summer at Bantam Lake, Litchfield, Conn., under the auspices 
of the American Association of Camouflage, and of Columbia 
University. The association was formed some time ago with 
Edwin H. Blashfield, chairman, and S. E. Fry, secretary. 
These artists have learned to paint "as things are not" so that 
enemy airmen may be cheated into believing that an innocent 



appearing clump of trees is what it seems and does not, on the 
contrary, conceal a machine gun. The young men may even 
have the fun of decorating "tanks" so as to render them less 
visible. Great numbers of French and British artists were 
recalled from the front early in the war to paint for their 
country. Here in America we have both an Eastern and West- 
ern Division of the American Camouflage with energetic 
members working at this new and most important "art." 

According to a report from Paris, Claude Monet has been 
commissioned by M. Clemenceau to paint Rheims Cathedral, 
which, as a result of the almost constant bombardment since 
the beginning of the war, is in a state of ruin, of most eloquent 
ruin, however. The painting will be placed in one of the large 
public buildings in Paris where it will undoubtedly attract a 
great deal of attention from the general public since it is pro- 
posed to convert the Cathedral into a pantheon for the heroic 
dead of all the Allies. 




CHINESE PORCELAIN 
Decorated in ttnderglaze red and blue. — Yang Cheng. 
One of the choicest bits of porcelain Dr. Denman Ross has given to the Boston 
Museum of Fine Arts. It is about nine inches tall, with a beautiful gray- 
ish white glaze, decorated with red dragons. 

(Courtesy of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts.) 

SNAP DRAGON (Color Study) 

Lucy M. Shover 

LIGHTEST lavender tones are Violet and a little Rose-pink. 
Flowers are Rose, shaded with same color used heavier, 
the yellow tones are Yellow Brown and also Albert Yellow. 
The white calyx is shaded with Brown Green and Albert Yel- 
low. For dark flowers use Blood Red, Rose and Ruby and 
Violet and for yellow touches use Albert Yellow and Yellow 
Brown. Stems are Yellow Green, Shading Green, Copenhagen 
Blue and Violet. Background is Dark Grey and a little Blood 
Red. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



93 



MRS. HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST - Page Editor 

2298 Commonwealth Ave.. St. Paul, Minn. 

TILE FOR BOOK ENDS 
Design, Tree of Knowledge 

USE ordinary soft tile 6x6. Tint the background with 
dull old ivory or putty tone. Trunk and branches of 
tree wood brown enamel. Leaves two tones of green and 
fruit bright orange. The black outline should be strong and 
decorative. A weak outline would detract from the effective- 
ness of the design. The tile should be set in frame of soft 
brown wood. 

ART NOTES 

The Zoloaga Exhibit which was shown in the Minneapolis 
Institute of art during July and August was an example of 
what an independent thinker and worker can accomplish. 
Zoloaga is practically self taught and his work is individual 
in the extreme. As a delineator of character and a painter 
of textiles he is exceptional and his coloring fairly takes one's 
breath. His nudes are materialistic — even vicious; his back- 
grounds decorative in the extreme. His peasants are human, 
characteristic and interesting and the exhibit as a whole strong 
and inspirational. 



The first meeting of the twin City Keramic Club was 
held at the State Fair Grounds onSeptember 7th. A picnic 
lunch was served and the club attended the Art Exhibit in a 
body. The 1917-18 officers were installed and plans for local 
work and the suggestion for a National League were discussed. 

Mrs. C. H. Dice, former President of the Portland, Ore. 
Keramic Club has been visiting in Minnesota and the middle 
West during the summer months. While in the Twin Cities 
she was the guest of Mrs. Henrietta Barclay Paist. 

♦> •:♦ ♦ 
"CO-OPERATIVE LEAGUE OF CHINA DECORATORS" 

OUR Editor has sounded a call to the colors (mineral colors) 
and has suggested the best possible solution to the 
problem which confronts Keramic Art. It remains with the 
workers to act on the suggestion. A conference of representa- 
tives from the Clubs all over the country would probably be 
necessary. That is the way other business would go about it. 
We once had such an organization — and the fact that it ceased 
to exist is not because the need was removed but was due 
probably to lack of sound business principles and co-operation. 
The need for concerted action is more imperative than at 
any time in the history of Keramic Art in this country. The 
point of view of Clubs and Societies is too local and the spirit 
too competitive. The world must see that co-operation not 







TILE FOR BOOK ENDS— HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST 



94 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



competition is the life of trade. As creators, we have not felt 
the need of organization. The creative side of our art is 
individualistic, but the creative is only one side. We must 
market our products or eventually cease to create. This 
certainly calls for co-operation on business principles. The 
Clubs and Societies already in existence would seem to be the 
nucleus for the larger organization. Each Club should strive 
to enlarge its membership and its educational advantages. 
Dues would have to be increased to cover the federation dues, 
local advertizing and subscription to our Art Magazine which 
should be considered the official organ of such league or feder- 
ation — for without such an organ no league could exist. This 
is about the only way that a magazine with a necessarily 
limited subscription can subsist and is a perfectly legitimate 
and logical way of securing to the workers the necessary 
publicity, intercommunication and inspiration. One of the 



lessons which artists have yet to learn is that we must spend 
money in order to earn money. We are too conservative in 
this respect. An annual National Exhibition and conference 
would enable us to discuss and exchange business methods — 
as well as artistic ideas. The situation is acute and must be 
recognized and dealt with if we would avoid gradual dissolu- 
tion. With a federation of Clubs and Societies each pledged 
to enlarge its membership and its scope — to establish sound 
business principles and to provide for an official magazine — 
Keramic Art should not only weather the present crisis but 
would be in position to dictate to local factories and dealers 
and compete with European trade after the war. 

It is not a question of American ability, we have the talent 
and the experience — what we need if we would make Ameri- 
can Keramic Art the power it should be is business organiza 
tion in place of the individual scramble of the past and present- 




KATHRYN E. CHERRY - Page Editor 

Marina Building, St. Louis, Mo. 

ENAMELS ON SEDJI 

The dark colors in Cadet Blue. The leaves are Aqua- 
marine. The flower is Sedji and the white berries are Jas- 
mine. 




ENAMELS ON SEDJI— KATHRYN E. CHERRY 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



95 




blue and green, the animal and leaf forms at base being blue. . 
The medium tones were yellow. Dark tones were black. 
The spot in neck of animal forms and in the double forms at 
top was red. 




MRS. VERNIE LOCKWOOD WILLIAMS - Page Editor 

University of Pittsburg. Home Studio, 52 W. Maiden St., Washington, Pa. 

DESIGN FOR FRUIT DISH 

THE animal motif for this design was taken from an old 
textile in the Metropolitan Museum. The dish was 
Japanese Tobe Ware of a rich cream tint. The stripes and 
all outlines were black. Either enamels or dusted colors may 
be used; however this piece was worked out in enamels, and 
the colors were blue, yellow, green, yellow red and lavender. 
The lightest tones were lavender. The light tones were the 





DESIGN FOR FRUIT DISH— MRS. VERNIE LOCKWOOD WILLIAMS 



96 



KERAMIC STUDIO 






MAUD M. MASON ..... Page Editor 

218 West 59th Street, New York City 

WORK OF THE PUPILS OF THE FAWCETT SCHOOL 
OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS. 

Miss Maud M. Mason, Instructor 

WE regret very much that several of the photographer's 
plates were lost so that many of the best pieces done 
in the Ceramic Class in the Fawcett School cannot be shown. 
However, the group presented will give a fair idea of what we 
are endeavoring to accomplish. While a few of the students 
have been working in the class for several years there are each 
year many new recruits. 

There were two prizes awarded, — one for a tea-set, won 
by Mrs. Charlotte Williamson, and one for a bowl, won by 
Mrs. Risley. Mrs. Williamson's set was delightful in design 
and color, being gray and inviting and was shown on charming 
linens designed to go with the set. Mrs. Risley's bowl was 
in full color with black carried most effectively through the 
design. 

The photographs of some of our best bowls were among 
those lost, so we are unable to present this group adequately. 
The group of bowls shown, (of common yellow kitchen ware) 
were effectively decorated in black and one or two colors. 
As usual the value of the blues is lost in the photographs of 
those articles decorated in that color in light tones, and the 
imagination has to be exercised in order to visualize the effect 
of them in the original. 

rj In the large bowl by Miss Weiss the predominating color 
is rich Turquoise Blue, black horizontal bands and spots, 
with Orange, Madder and a touch of Blue in the design. 
The large plate shown interested me especially. It was the 
work of a pupil who never worked previously to this year and 
I feel it is more truly an expression of herself than almost any 
other piece exhibited, having an imaginative quality with well 
spaced decorations. 

It is our object in teaching this class to encourage and 
assist the pupils to express their own ideas and avoid the pit- 
falls that groups of workers are apt to fall into, that of having 
all the work bear a strong family resemblance. 




WORK OF PUPILS IN THE FAWCETT SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART, NEWARK, N. J. 
MISS MAUD M. MASON, INSTRUCTOR 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



97 






WORK OF PUPILS IN THE FAWCETT SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART, NEWARK, N. J. 
MISS MAUD M. MASON, INSTRUCTOR 



98 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




Work of pupils of Fawcett School of Industrial Art. 

GLASS DECORATION 

Marie A. Frick 

A FEW years ago I was called upon by a firm in Philadel- 
phia, to know if I could help them out in duplicating 
the decorated glassware they had on hand, as they could not 
supply the demand. I told them I was sorry it was not china 
they wanted, as I had decorated that for over thirty years. 
However, the offer was quite alluring, and so I said if they 
would give me a little time, I probably could help them out. 

As I knew there would be quite a few obstacles to over- 
come, I tried to hasten the matter by finding someone who 
could give me some points Not succeeding in this, I was 
determined to study the art for myself, and I will gladly give 
my experience, dearly bought, to those interested in learning 
this most fascinating art. 

First of all I sent for three sample outfits in colors, and 
they were legion, so I sifted out from these, those which fired 
successfully. I should advise in the first place to become 
acquainted with the colors, to see just what each one stands 
for. And instead of using good glassware, you should do what 
I did, go to the firms that handle glass, and ask them for broken 
or cracked pieces of crystal glass, and they will no doubt 
readily comply with your request. And on these I would test 
the colors, and have them fired. They are most valuable as 
future guides. 

Let your first attempts mean something, and not be merely 
daubs of color. Carry out a motif. You find plenty of these 
in your old magazines, if you do not want to depend upon your 
own resources. 

After having selected one with large spaces, place this 
before you and cover it with one of your pieces of glass, and 
with a sable tracer, outline every part of the design with Wind- 
sor & Newton's Chinese white (water color), which, of course, 
fires away. I find it better than gold or black, as I find re- 
tracing better, after the colors are laid in. I save all my glass 
slabs after using the Roman gold, and clean them well, and 
use them for my palettes, instead of a large slab, as I would 
advise not mixing more than one color at a time, and using 
that on all the parts you wish it. This holds good for all time. 
After you have mixed, say Russian Green, with fat oil and 
turpentine to the same consistency as for china colors, you use 
Lavender oil to paint with. Dip a square shader in this oil, 
and apply the color with as few touches as possible, and put on 
quite thinly. After the motif is filled in with as many colors 



as necessary, and after these colors are thoroughly dry, then 
outline over the white line with outline black with another 
tracer. I used the black for my samples. It is best to save 
the gold for more perfect ware. Then after your lines are all 
filled in, have your glass fired. It requires but one firing. 

Use all your colors in this way with the exception of white 
enamel, which I will use under a different head in another article. 

I will say further that all colors fire very much deeper 
than when applied. Following is the outfit I have used from 
the Drakenfeld list: 

Carmine 47 Night Green Brilliant 

Rose Pink 182 Turquoise Blue 134 

Ruby Purple Ultramarine Blue Dark 

Violet Purple Gray Black 

Coral Red 153 Transparent Best Black 

Blood Red 10 White Enamel 649 

Red Brown 1 Bottle Fat Oil 

Genuine Albert Yellow 1 Bottle Lavender Oil 

Deep Yellow 1 Bottle Demar Varnish 

Yellow Brown light Turpentine (Best) 

Dark Brown 177 Square Shadera Nos. 2 to 7 

Yellow Green 2 Sable Liners 

Grass Green Half -pan Windsor & Newton 

Olive Green 1 Chinese White (water color) 

Russian Green Roman Gold for Glass 

A Vial of Liquid Bright Gold 

(To be continued) 
a** it 

STUDIO NOTE 

Mrs. Leah Rodman Tubby is once more busily engaged in 
work in her studio at 306 Vista St., Hollywood, Los Angeles, 
Cal., where she is giving instructions in china decoration. For 
a long time Mrs. Tubby has been in Alaska where she has 
made some very interesting studies of the flowers of that 
vicinity. 

** *r 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

L. B. — We cannot gel any but the hard china in Canada and I hare tried 
enamels bat find they chip off? 

2. Will you please tell me how to mix enamels and what with? 
8. Is hard enamel mixed tuith any desired color alright'? 

1. It is best to avoid the use of enamels on anything but Bellcek, Sat- 
suma and Seji ware. Sometimes they are successful en the hard ware but 
you are always running a great risk and they generally chip < IT in time. 

2. You will find a lesson in Enamel work in Beginners' Corner of Jan- 
uary 1917 Keramic Studio. 

3. It is best to use the ready prepared colors and the medium prepared 
for them. 

D. C. — / wish to decorate a French china punch bowl, fruit design in dull 
lavender, rose and yellow. What shall I do with the 10 inch separate base, 
very elaborate in embossed design, xvilh three feet? 

A great deal will depend on whether the design is realistic or conven- 
tional. If realistic, continue the background color down into it and add 
darker colors if they will blend in. If conventional tint it to match the 
general tone. If there is gold in the design the feet could be in gold. Treat 
it as if there was no embossing. 

A. M. W. — Can you tell me of any make of china color (over-glaze) that is 
a good orange? Also an old rose combining well with grey blues? 

2. What is best for a grounding oil in using dusting colors': Can the 
Fry or La Croix powder colors be used to dust by adding ivory glaze or pearl 
grey? They seem to be intense when used pure. 

1. There is no color of itself but it can be obtained by combining. 
Albert Yellow, Yellow Brown and Yellow Red will make it. Mrs. Cherry's 
Old Rose will probably be the Old Rose you are looking for. 

2. Any Grounding Oil or Special Oil for Dusting advertised in this 
magazine is satisfactory. Any powder color can be used for dry dusting 
and if too intense can be lightened with Ivory Glaze or Pearl Grey. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



99 




PLATES— J. CX BALDA 
Designs suitable for glass decoration in gold, colored lines and enamels. 



NO. 1 — Paint the lines of the design and the fine band 
lines with Black. The outer heavy band is painted 
with 1 part Apple Green, 1 Shading Green and 1 Copen- 
hagen Blue. The light part in eye of feather is Banding Blue 
and the dark is 1 Apple Green and 1 Yellow Green. Second 
fire— Paint background space around feathers with Apple 
Green and a little Dark Grey. 

No. 2 — All outlines and bands are Gold, also all small 
squares except in flower form. Those in flower forms are 



painted with Yellow Brown and a touch of Yellow Red and 
remainder of flower is Albert Yellow; treat in flat, do not 
shade. The group of horizontal lines is painted with Apple 
Green and a little Albert Yellow and the small dark space 
with Apple Green, Shading Green and a little Dark Grey. 

No. 3 — Paint all of this design in Gold omitting the out- 
line and shading. The fine line around the outside of the 
design and the bands are Black. 



100 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



BEGINNERS' CORNER 

JESSIE M. BARD ------ Page Editor 

Dickinson Seminary, Williamsport, Pa. 

NOTES ON FIRING 

"p\IRECTIONS for operating the kiln are sent with it so 
-L' it is not necessary to take up that part of the subject. 
The heat in different kilns is not- alike so it is necessary to learn 
the hottest places in the kiln before doing any particular firing. 
It is best to put only a few pieces of china in the kiln for the 
first firing and they should be those that do not need careful 
firing. Gold work, or pieces that have colors which do not 
over-fire easily, such as blues and greens, are good for this fire. 

Gold should have a rather hot fire for the first time and a 
light one for second fire. 

Gold on Belleek ware is very easily overfired and should 
be just a little more than baked in. Blues and greens can be 
put in the hottest place in the kiln which is usually at the back 
and near the floor, it is cooler near the top and in the front. 
Some yellows weaken if fired too hot and should have a light 
fire. Pink requires the most careful fire, for it requires just a 
certain heat whereas with other colors a little more or less heat 
does not matter. If pink is overfired it has a bluish tint and 
if underfired is a bricky red. It requires a rose heat, just a 
little hotter than for gold. 

Belleek ware requires about the same heat as the pink. 

Satsuma is fired at just the same heat as the china, de- 
pending on the decoration that is on it. 

Green Seji ware is a little softer than china and should 
not be given the very hottest place in the kiln though it can be 
fired almost as hot as china. 

Enamels require almost the hottest place if the heat is 
not carried very high. 

Some people test the heat with cones, pointed pieces of 
fire clay which melt at different heats, they are placed in 
the kiln in such a position that they can be watched during the 
firing and when the heat is reached the cone will melt down 
which is the signal to turn off the heat. Cones are not neces- 
sary, they take up valuable room in the kiln, most people 



watch the color of the inside of the kiln and regulate it in that 
way. After firing from a half to three-quarters of an hour 
the kiln will begin to get red inside and after it is a good red a 
hazy color will come over it, this is the heat that should be 
attained for the pinks. After the haze, there will be a white 
glow, this is a very hot fire and cannot be used for last fire. 

Pieces should be arranged in the kiln according to the 
heat they require, those requiring the hottest fire should be 
placed in the hottest place and others accordingly. 

Different sized stilts will be sent with the kiln. These are 
used to put between pieces in stacking in order to have a cur- 
rent of air around the pieces to prevent cracking and also to 
prevent one piece from leaving marks on another, this is only 
necessary where the paint is heavy, it does not matter if one 
piece of china touches another unless it touches a painted 
surface. 

Belleek must not touch anything or the two pieces touch- 
ing will stick together. 

The Satsuma ware is not very hard and it is best not to 
stack much weight on it, only light pieces should be placed on it. 
Platten is splendid to use in stacking, it comes in large sheets 
and can be cut to any size piece. Platten is safer than stilts 
when stacking one piece on top of another because it is more 
steady and sometimes the stilts leave marks where they touch 
the china which the platten does not do. 

Do not use stilts on Satsuma, Belleek ware or Seji as they 
leave marks. 

It is best to place a heavy piece of china on a stilt so the 
heat can go under it and cause the whole to heat evenly and 
prevent cracking. 



PLATE DESIGN BY VERA STONE 

THE outline, heavy band and center of leaf are black. 
Oil the smallest circles in background and dust with 
Mode. Oil leaf and dust with Florentine Green. Oil largest 
circles and dust with Yellow for Dusting or 4 parts Ivory 
Glaze and 1 part Albert Yellow. The remaining circles are 
dusted with Deep Ivory. Paint edge between two outer lines 
with Dark Grey and a little Yellow Brown. 




PLATE DESIGN— VERA STONE 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



101 




PLATE— J. O. BALDA 

Design sttitatle for glass decoration in gold, colored lines and enamels. 

Draw the bands and the large rectangle and draw the smaller squares and lines in free hand. This entire design may be 
carried out in Gold, painting the shaded squares with a solid flat wash of Gold. 




CUP AND SAUCER— SYVILLA FISTER 

Outline with Black and fire. Second fire — Tint with Old Ivory Luster. Leaves are Yellow Brown Luster, also stems and 

small band. Stamens are Orange Luster and flowers are White. Band at outer 

edge is Gold brought down to meet design. 



102 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




No. 2 

THE LINEN PAGE. 

JETTA EHLERS ------ p AGE Editor 

i 8 East Kinney Street, Newark, N. J. 

FROM one of the little napkins shown this month, a very 
attractive, simple and inexpensive dining-room was 
evolved. The napkin itself was made from a spare piece of 
linen found in "the chest." It is a light silvery grey in color. 
The wood-block printing is in a soft grey green. The edge 
was rolled, and then finished with cross-stitch in green. This 
is very easily done. Simply overhand all around and then 
reverse the stitch. The length of the overhand stitch deter- 
mines the size of the cross-stitch. Practice on a bit of material 
until a satisfactory stitch is made. This makes such a charm- 
ing edge and for speed in making quite discounts any other. 
Less than an hour was used in the fashioning of the napkin 
illustrated, printing and all. The finished piece proved to be 
so attractive that an inspiration came to make the entire set. 
By good luck the linen could be matched. It is a risky busi- 
ness these days to attempt to match colored linens. If you 
are to make a set, by all means purchase what you need at 
the one time, for it is almost hopeless to go back later and match 
it. The dies vary considerably, and a new bolt rarely exactly 
matches the last, even though sold under the same number 
and supposedly the same. So do not attempt sets of things 
without this in mind. The cloth was made a yard and a half 
square, the edges finished with the cross-stitch, and the block 
printing placed as on the napkins. Two rows were used of 
eight units each, instead of the one row of four units as on the 
smaller piece. White china on this looked too cold. The 
yellow Wedgwood was lovely, but not caring to spend much, 
a general overhauling of the store of china on hand resulted 
in sufficient pieces to make up a set. 

These were tinted a deep cream or old ivory, using two 
parts of Yellow Brown and one scant part of Yellow Green. 
The yellow brown quality must predominate. When fired, 



No. J 

the set was decorated with simple bands of green, and little 
floret motifs painted on freehand, the idea being to carry out 
the same freedom of treatment suggested by the linens. 

Obviously a labored decoration would not be in keeping 
with the simple linen set. The little florets were done in rather 
gay coloring, old blue, reddish violet and a bit of orange being 
used. Next came the idea of painting a table and chairs. 
An ordinary drop leaf table and four wooden seated chairs 
were discovered and utilized for this. After considerable 
experimenting, a good grey with a suggestion of warmth was 
decided on. The pieces were given three coats of paint, rub- 
bing down the first two with steel wool. This gave a nice 
body, and when the chairs were further decorated with quaint 
baskets of flowers painted on the broad top piece, the set 
proved very attractive. 

The same bright coloring of the florets on the china was 
repeated in the flower baskets. Having gone so far, the idea 
of doing the entire room persisted, and so the windows were 
the next thing tackled. Plain curtains of cream voile were 
used. These hung about an inch below the window sills and 
were finished with a two inch hem. Grey denim was used 
for inside curtains and valance. Upon this were stitched three 
inch bands of green denim. The valance was cut in a wide 
shallow scallop with a deeper square cornered piece at each 
end. This also had the appliqued green bands, which were 
set back on this, as well as the curtains, about three quarters 
of an inch from the edge. Both were lined with grey green 
cotton sateen. One-half width of the material was used for 
the side pieces which hang perfectly straight. 

All of the curtain materials were inexpensive, and the 
labor and time spent in making them was but a trifle. The 
walls of the room were tinted a French grey and the woodwork 
painted the same tone. By doing this the room seemed 
less "cut" than would have been the case had a contrasting color 
been used. The idea was to get a good neutral background, 
as little broken as possible, as the room was small. The floor 
covering chosen to come within the very limited finances of 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



103 



this venture, was a colonial rag rug in which there was much 
grey and green. 

A rather long narrow table was painted to match the 
other furniture, and with an old mirror hung over it, did duty 
as a side board or serving table. A large brass bowl for flowers 
filled with bright blooms from the garden gave a gay note to 
the room. Candlesticks, large tray and Russian samovar of 
brass, reflected the sunlight and helped to "brighten the corner." 
These were already on hand and so did not come out of the 
allowance. 

And so this all grew from the one little napkin, a set whose 
chief charm is the simplicity of it all. One need not be appalled 
at the task of getting it together and in these busy days that 
is a great consideration. 

One of the most restful rooms I ever remember entering 
was a grey room. Drift-wood grey was the color note, and 



with it was used a bit of wistaria and cool green. It was so 
quiet and simple in its color scheme, that one came into it 
out of the noise of the street with a feeling of immense relief. 
In the dining room described in this article, a bit of gayer color 
was introduced. The cheery bit of color is like a smiling good 
natured person, who puts everyone about them into a good 
humour. When we come together about the table perhaps we 
need a little stimulating and while the grey is soothing to our 
tired nerves, we need the dash of color as well for this occasion. 
The second napkin is part of the set, the cloth of which 
was shown in the August number. This set would fit in well 
with fumed oak, with deep cream walls and peach colored 
curtains. Peace colored our printer called it last month! 
Since the war color is red, I presume there must be a peace 
color. I am afraid we are off the subject of linens again. 
First thing we know the editor will be changing our title. 







innnnnr'i 

L) >: ... <; - : r 

( ¥ V ¥ V ¥ ¥ 



... . 



$*&: 



D 



■v.'-v S.&.,/, 'or. 
3rr*V;\ v.' 






BOWL—MARY L. BRIGHAM 
Can be easily adapted to glass. 



Oil petals of flowers and dust with Grey Blue. Oil leaves and dust with Florentine Green. The upper band is of the Blue 
and the lower one of the Green. Stems and all dark tones are Green Gold. 



104 

MAY E. REYNOLDS JUDSON - 

116 Auditorium Building, Chicago, 111. 



KERAMIC STUDFO 

Page Editor 



CANDLESTICK 

T> LACK lines are in outlining ink that fires in, and the bands 
-L* are in Roman Gold. Widest space is tinted in Neutral 
Yellow and Violet, also the space at lower part of candlestick 
is in Neutral Yellow, Drab and Violet, narrower space near 
top is in Grey for White Roses, and space at top is Yellow Green. 
The four bands at top are in Roman Gold and are not outlined 
in the ink. The roses are painted in Rose, for the lighter parts, 
American Beauty for the darker parts, and Crimson Purple 
for the shadows. Center of lower rose is in Lemon Yellow, 
and Auburn Brown, with Hair Brown for the deepest tones. 
Leaves in Apple Green and Violet and for the darker leaves 
Empire Green, Dark Green, and Violet. Stems and veins in 
Violet, a little Best Black, and a touch of Neutral Yellow and 
Finishing Brown. Background of roses, Violet, Drab and a 
little Brown Green, pat out until tone is dainty, also a very 
light wash of American Beauty, Peach Blossom, or Pink 
Glaze can be used near the roses, to give them a sunny back- 
ground. Put on the Roman Gold bands after the tints have 
gone on, and the roses and leaves are finished. 

Second Fire — Retouch in same colors used in first fire, 
and go over the gold bands again, with the Roman Gold. 



Mrs. James Charles Reynolds announces the marriage of 
her daughter May Elizabeth to Mr. Wilber Judson, on Tuesday, 
August 28th, 1917. 

^ i? 

FIRING 

Mrs. Harry 0. Jones 

IN teaching in a small town one reaps experience that per- 
haps does not come to one who has the advantages of the 
city with its circle of china decorators. 

In reading and in questions we could not find all the assist- 
ance needed for firing. At first we stacked one plate above 
the other with a small stilt between, and had splendid results 
for a while, but finally we noticed three little holes on the plates, 
made by the stilts. Then we tried putting an asbestos 
board between each plate with the result that four or five were 
broken, which we accredited to the fact that the air could not 
circulate freely. We have used the asbestos board however 
between cups and articles where the air could reach all parts 
equally. We had good success in stack- 
ing plates on edge, one against the other, 
being careful that only unglazed sur- 
faces touched the glazed but sometimes 
they would stick, probably because not 
enough care was exercised, or on account 
of poor china. Placing the asbestos card 
between the plates, stacked on edge, elim- 
inated this danger, but we have found 
small streaks where the card has rested. 
Then we learned that, by stacking the 
plates on edge with a small stilt between, 
these former difficulties could be sur- 
mounted. It is more difficult to keep the 
plates in place this way and takes more 
space but we have the satisfaction of feel- 
ing when the firing is in progress, that 
there is no danger of "kiln marks." 





CANDLESTICK— MAY E. REYNOLDS JUDSON 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



105 




FOUR DESIGNS FOR PLATES— ADELINE MORE 



NO 1 — Lightest part of flower is a very delicate wash of 
Deep Blue Green and Sea Green or Turquoise Blue. 
Add a little Banding Blue for shading. Center is Albert Yel- 
low shaded with Yellow Brown. Darker flower is Deep Blue 
Green and Banding Blue with a little Violet added for shading. 
Center is Yellow Brown and a little Blood Red. Leaves are 
Apple Green and Albert Yellow shaded with Shading Green 
and Copenhagen Blue. Stems, Brown Green and Yellow 
Brown. Dark bands are Shading Green, Copenhagen Blue 
and Apple Green. Outer edge is a thin wash of Dark Grey 
and a little Apple Green. 

No. 2 — Flowers are painted with a thin wash of Albert 
Yellow and shaded with the same color used a little heavier 
and a little Yellow Brown added to it. Deep tone in center 
is Yellow Brown. Leaves Apple Green and Yellow Brown with 
Brown Green added for shading. Bands are Gold. 



No. 3— The Rose is White. Paint leaves around the 
rose with Apple Green and a little Copenhagen Blue and add 
Shading Green and Brown Green for darker touches. Light- 
est tone in rose is left white and Violet and a little Albert 
Yellow used for shadows. Center is Yellow Brown. Stems 
are Brown Green and Violet. Light part of bud is Blood Red. 
Bands and dark spaces under rose are Copenhagen Blue and 
a little Banding Blue. Outer edge is a very thin wash of 
Sea Green. 

No. 4— Light tone in roses is a very thin wash of Rose 
and shading is of the same color used heavier and a little 
Blood Red added for centers. Leaves are Apple Green 
and Yellow Brown with Brown Green added. Bands are 
Gold. 



106 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



WALTER K. T1TZE - - - - - Page Editor 

210 Fuller Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. 



VASE, JAPANESE FIGURES 
T TSE a large cylinder vase (Belleek), apply design twice, or 
v>* three times if permissable. First working. — Trace de- 
sign in carefully and outline with India Ink. All dark bands, 
flower pots, stems and long leaf forms are oiled and dusted 
with Mode; small clover leaf shaped flower is left white. 
Paint in figures and scene next. Keep background in soft 
tones of violet and greys and in the foreground use a little of 
the greens, but remember to keep the general effect a purple 
grey. Do not work up figures as much as in study. I have 
brought out detail so as to reproduce better. Use violet for 
one dress and a soft yellow for the other with a touch of dark 
grey and black for hair and all dark touches. Keep the para- 
sol soft in color, using Violet of Iron for handles, etc. Lan- 
terns in soft tones of blues, greys, and greens. 

Second working. — Oil and dust entire vase, with excep- 
tion of scene, with 2 parts Pearl Grey and 2 parts Lavender 
Glaze or you may use Lavender Glaze 3 parts and Warm Grey 
1 part. Retouch scene and fire. 

If enamels are desired use enamels corresponding in color 
with glazes. 





VASE, JAPANESE FIGURES— WALTER K. TITZE 




TO 



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" No. 2. Flower Painting, etc., 3.00 

" No. 3. Figure Painting, etc., 3.00 

" No. 4. Conventional Decoration, etc. 3.00 

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CONTRIBUTORS 

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ANITA GRAY CHANDLER 
ADA MAUD CHAPIN 
KATHRYN E, CHERRY 
IDA NOWELS COCHRAN 
ESTHER A, COSTER 
JETTA EHLERS 
MARION L. FOSDICK 
MARIE A. FRICK 
ALBERT W. HECKMAN 
ADELINE MORE 
HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST 

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The entire contents of this Magazine are covered by the general copyright and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 

CONTENTS OF NOVEMBER, 1917 



Editorial 

At the Sign of the Brash and Palette 

Constrictive Design vs. Adaptation 

Design Unit— Butterflies 

Aztec Motif 

The Book Shelf 

Enamel or Dry Dusting on Belleek 

Cup and Saucer 

The Linen Page 

Design for Chop Plate 

Beginners' Corner — Tea Tile, Wild Asters 

Answers to Correspondents 

Jardiniere 

Luncheon Set 

Glass Enamel Decoration 

Cup and Saucer 

Grapes 

Breakfast Set in Black and Red (Color Study) 

Fish Plate 

Cosmos 



Anita Gray Chandler 

Henrietta Barclay Paist 

Henrietta Barclay Paist 

Esther A. Coster 

Anita Gray Chandler 

Kathryn E. Cherry 

Alleyne C. Webber 

Jetta Ehiers 

Mrs. Vernie Lockwood Williams 

Jessie M. Bard 

Ada Maud Chapin 
Ida Nowells Cochran 
Marie A. Frick 
E. W. Tally 
Marion L, Fosdick 
Albert W. Heckman 
Adeline More 
Marion L. Fosdick 



Page 
107 
108 
109 
109 
110 
110 
111 
111 
112 
114 
115 
US 
115 
116 
117 
117 
118 
119 
120 
121 




THE OLD RELIABLE 



FITCH KILNS 



HPHESE KILNS have been in successful use 
for ovef 40 years and are today known for 

the excellence of the firing results as well as their 

low first production 
cost — low firing cost 
and low cost for up- 
keep and repairs. 




GASSKILN.pJSizcs. 



We will send circulars and 

prices promptly 

on request. 



STEARNS FITCH & CO., 
SPRINGFIELD, OHIO. 

1875—1817 



THESE BOOKS SENT POST-PAID 
ON RECEIPT OF PRICE 

Mrs. Filkin's A. B. C. for Beginners in China Painting $1.00 

How to apply Enamels by Mabel C. Dibble _ „ 60 

Book on Methods for painting in Water Color by Gertrude Eatabrook 1.00 

Colors and Coloring in China Painting „ .„„.. .25 

Lunn's Practical Pottery, 2 vols, (or rols. sold singly |2.15 each) 4.00 

The Teaoher of China Painting by D. M. Campana. 79 

Firing China and Glass by Campana „ „.. .87 

Book of Monograms by Campana 42 

Books 2 and 3 "Decorative Designs," by Campana, each 83 

'Water Color Painting," Designs by Campagna, 53 

'The Teacher of Oil Painting," Designs by Campana 53 

Flat Enamel Decoration in China by Mrs. L. T. 8teward 1.25 

Home Furnishing by Alice M. Kellogg (Pub. at 1.50) 75 

The Human Figure by Vanderpool 2.00 

Marka of American Potters by E. A. Barber™ „ 2.25 

American Glassware, Old and New „ 1.00 

Grand Feu Ceramics 5.00 

The Fruit Book 3.00 

The Rose Book 3.00 

The Art of Teaching China Decoration, Class Room No. 1 3.00 

Flower Painting on Porcelain, Class Room No. 2 3.00 

Figure Painting on Porcelain and Firing, Class Room No. 3 3.00 

Conventional Decoration of Pottery and Porcelain, Class Room No. 4.. 3.00 

Book of Cups and Saucers 1.50 

Book of Little Things to Make 2.00 

Keramic Decorations Nellie F. Mcintosh 1.00 

Eberlein <fc McClure's "Practical Book of Early American Arts and 

Crafts," post paid, net 6.00 

"Handicrafts for the Handicapped" by Herbert J. Hall and Mertice M. 

C. Buck, post paid 1.35 

Pottery for Artists, Craftsmen and Teachers by Geo. J. Cox, 1.35 

Design and the Decoration of Porcelain, by Henrietta Barclay Paist 

Paper Cover $1.50 Cloth Cover $2.50 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 



When writing to advertisers please mention this magazine 




PLATE IN BLACK AND RED-ALBERT W. HECKMAN 



NOVEM BER 191V 
KERAMIC STU DIO 



KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO 



OCT 29 1917 




Vol. XIX, No. 7. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



November 1917 




VERY cloud has its silver lining. 
In tha midst of a disorganized busi- 
ness there is still hope and among 
many conviction that the china 
business will revive after the war. 
There is no reason why it should 
not. However poorly organized, 
however inconsistent in many ways, 
individual decoration of porcelain 
by women rests on two solid facts. 
First, there is an enormous, growing, constantly renewed 
demand for specially decorated china and glass of all kinds. 
In porcelain tableware alone, one of the Syracuse factories 
produces over eight million pieces of decorated ware a year. 
That is only one factory. There are many other porcelain 
makers in the United States and before the war they 
could supply only 25% of the demand, the other 75% 
were supplied by Europe. This gives an idea of the tremen- 
dous possibilities in a field in which individual decorators 
play only a small part, although their consumption of white 
china reached before the war very respectable figures. There 
is room for practically unlimited development, especially 
if the majority of decorators learn to do what the minority 
are doing now, artistic work of far greater merit than me- 
chanical factory work. 

There is another solid foundation to individual china, 
glass and pottery decoration by women, the fact that the 
emancipation cf women is progressing with rapid strides. 
More and more women become independent, make it a point 
to be able, if necessity arises, to earn their own living, or, even 
if there is no absolute necessity, feel the need of a useful and 
renumerative occupation. This will be increasingly the case 
in the years to come and what occupation is there more at- 
tractive than china decoration? The elements are easily 
mastered and women with a little persistence and taste are 
soon able to earn a fair sum. After a while teaching beginners 
is an easy way to add to the income. 

If one keeps in mind these two fundamental facts, and 
realizes that the present decline of the business is not due to 
lack of interest in the work but to abnormal and temporary 
conditions, there is certainly no reason to be discouraged, 
and the only thing to do is to prepare now for the better times 
to come. 

Decorators can do their share of this preparation by or- 
ganizing their business on a sounder basis than it has had so 
far. We will not repeat what we have already said on this 
subject. That part of the problem is the decorators' part. 
Keramic Studio has also its share to take in this preparation 
for a better, bigger business after the war. It must help 
decorators in a more efficient way if possible and that means 
that its editor must have constantly in mind the improvement 
of the Magazine in quality of designs, and also it must in some 
way appeal to the great mass of beginners and of decorators 
for whom advanced work has no special interest. On the 
other hand Keramic Studio must pay its expenses and give a 
living to its publishers. 

We do not need to say that the problem is not easy. 
Exactly what conditions will be after the war in regard to 



publishing expenses is much a matter of guess work. The 
cost of material, paper, ink, etc., may not be as high as it is 
now but in a general way prices will never come back to the 
old level. With the present tax law, the cost of mailing will 
gradually increase until in 1921 all the encouragement which 
has been given to publications by the low rate of second class 
matter will have disappeared. The price of magazines, if 
they are going to survive, will have to be adjusted in some 
way to the new conditions. 

However complex the problem, we think we will be able 
to solve it. Keramic Studio has lived over eighteen years 
and must continue its work. It will do so. Changes of some 
kind may be necessary, and they will be made as soon as 
there are signs of peace and of a revival of the china business, 
but whatever these changes may be they will not lower the 
quality of the Magazine. There is no possibility of a perman- 
ent revival unless better work is done all around than was 
done before the war and Keramic Studio must keep up with 
the movement for better, more artistic work in all lines of 
craftswork. 

Until conditions become normal its subscription price 
will remain what it is now. But we remind our friends that 
at present there is absolutely no profit in its publication, and 
we urge them to continue their support, both as subscribers 
and advertisers, even if this means to them a temporary sacri- 
fice. Our final decision in regard to changes, especially in 
regard to the subscription price, will very much depend on 
the support we receive from now to next January. 

The Detroit School of Design, 546 Jefferson Ave., E., 
Detroit, Mich, announces the opening in October of its seventh 
year. Courses in illustration, fashion design, poster, decora- 
tive and mural design, architectural and normal art, etc. 
Children's courses in design, color harmony and drawing. 

Mr. Walter K. Titze writes to us that he has been drafted 
for the war and will be unable to send his page in Keramic 
Studio for the present but intends to continue the work as 
soon as he returns to civil life. 

A subscriber sends us a very attractive set of Satsuma 
beads decorated in flat enamels, also instructions for decora- 
ting and firing them. We will publish these instructions 
and illustration of the beads in next issue. If there is de- 
mand for beads the Satsuma people and undoubtedly other 
potteries would put them on the market in quantities. It 
seems to be an interesting new field. 

STUDIO NOTE 

After a long illness Miss Louise Seinecke of Cincinnati, 
is back in her studio full of ambition and energy in the work 
for which she is so well fitted, that of glass decorating and 
glass staining. Miss Seinecke makes a specialty of instruct- 
ing teachers in this art, which is having wide-spread interest 
throughout the United States. 



108 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



ANITA GRAY CHANDLER 

7 Edison Avenue. Tufts College, Mass. 



Page Editor 



^mw^ 




b 



AT THE SIGN 

OF THE 
BRUSH AND PALETTE 

This is Ye Old Art Inn 
where the worker of Arts and 
Crafts may rest a bit and par- 
take of refreshment 



THE work of summer art school students from many parts 
of the country was exhibited from Oct. 1 to Oct. 12, 
in the galleries of the Art Alliance of America, New York 
City. There was an interesting display of arts and crafts 
from the Berkshire Summer School of Art, under direction of 
the Pratt Institute instructors. The Art Students' League of 
New York was well represented. Among the other schools to ex- 
hibit were the Art Institute of Chicago, the Minneapolis 
Institute of Art, the Annspaugh Art School of Dallas, Texas, 
and the summer art school of the Pennsylvania Academy of 
Fine Arts which is held at Chester Springs, Penn. The value of 
such exhibitions as these can easily be seen as they tend not only 
to spur the students on to redoubled efforts but they give the 
public, even if it is merely the art-loving public, the opportun- 
ity to see what is being done in this country in the way of 
art. A students' exhibition is held every year in Boston that 
attracts many besides fond parents, aunts, and cousins. The 
Boston Museum School of Fine Arts holds its students' ex- 
hibition in one of the museum galleries where one may see 
work of the most interesting order. Not infrequently a stu- 
dent himself will explain just what a certain piece of modelling 
or a particular picture is intended to convey. Most of the 
work at student exhibitions is refreshing, naive, and original. 
Self-expression seems to be the watchword. 

The project for decorating the Missouri State Capitol 
has been put into the hands of a most competent committee 
composed of the following well known people : Professor Pickard 
of the State University, Mr. Bixby of the City Art Museum 
of St. Louis, Mr. Downing, treasurer of the Kansas City Art 
League, Mr. Kocian, a St. Louis art dealer, and Mrs. Painter, 
former state regent of the Daughters of the American Revo- 
lution. Mr. Egerton Swarthout is the architect. 

That America is rich in mural decoration will be made 
evident to one who reads the recently published pamphlet 
of the Mural Painters, a national organization founded a 
little over twenty years ago. Though mural decoration in 
this country is of comparatively recent date the work accom- 
plished is in the main of the highest order, and the list of 
artists engaged in it is surprisingly long. The names of John 
W. Alexander, John La Farge, Kenyon Cox, Edwin H. Blash- 
field and Ernest Peixotto stand out among many others less 
familiar. The society known as the Mural Painters was 
organized for the purpose of developing the arts which are 
used in the embellishment of architecture, whether carried 
out in pigment, stained-glass, tapestry, mosaic, or other suita- 



ble mediums; also to regulate decorative contests, by-laws for 
professional practice, and "for the establishment of an educa- 
tional propaganda through^the agency of lectures, existing 
schools, and in whatever ways opportunity may suggest." 
For those art clubs expecting to study murals this winter this 
pamphlet will be found quite valuable. 

Late in September last, the beautiful old Havana Cathe- 
dral in which rest the bones of no less a personage than Colum- 
bus, was threatened with sale and subsequent demolition. 
Instantly a storm of protest arose from historians, artists, and 
public-spirited people who considered it nothing less than 
desecration to destroy an edifice so ancient, beautiful and 
historically significant. As a result the members of the 
National Historical Society of Cuba interested themselves in 
saving the cathedral for posterity, and it is thought by those 
who understand the situation that it will be taken over by 
the Cuban Government as a national monument. The chief 
art treasure is a small Murillo, depicting the Pope and the 
Cardinals celebrating mass prior to the departure of Columbus 
on his portentous voyage. The. interior decorations are in 
themselves of the choicest order, being well worth the Cuban 
government's saving, even if the bones of Columbus and the 
little Murillo did not warrant it. The building is 213 years 
old; it was completed in 1704 by the Jesuits; in 1705 the 
Columbus relics were brought to its crypt from Santo Domingo. 




Designs adapted for an old Moorish platter. Applied to modern Japanese 
yellow pottery 

The Boston Publie Library is showing a group of French 
war posters this autumn in its Fine Arts room in connection 
with a collection of photographs illustrating French art. 
Sculpture, painting and architecture are included among them. 
Details of Rheims Cathedral, both exterior and interior, seem 
to interest the visitors more than any others. One hears 
many pronunciations of the well known word. Some make it 
rhyme with "dreams," others with "dimes," still others with 
"France," either broad or flat "a." The war posters, as might 
be expected, are generally somber in tone. Very little of the 
proverbial "French gaiety" appears. In perhaps two, genuine 
humor is expressed. The most impressive in the collection 
represents Cardinal Mercier defending his people against the 
invaders. The red in his robes stands out as sharply as blood 
against the doleful greys and blacks of his people who are 
massed in at the left of the drawing in every attitude of des- 
pair. The Cardinal's figure is valiant, protecting and protest- 
ing. Done in other medium and less sketchily this might 
well be a lasting picture. It has the elements of greatness. 




J@L-~JS—- 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



109 




MRS. HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST - Page Editor 

2298 Commonwealth Ave., St. Paul, Minn. 

CONSTRUCTIVE DESIGN VS. ADAPTATION 

FROM time to time it is necessary to pull ourselves up and 
enquire whither we are tending. To recall, truths of 
which we are all aware and to which we give theoretical assent 
but fail to live up to. We need them for ballast and should not 
throw them overboard or lock them up and lose the key. 

For years we have been conscientiously studying to learn 
what constitutes a legitimate decoration. The answer which 
must appeal to all sincere workers as logical is that a decora- 
tion should be (or at least appear to be) organic — and not an 
afterthought; that it should be consistent with the shape 
and purpose of the object decorated. 

How much of the present decoration will stand the test 
of that definition? How much conforms to the structural 
demands of the piece and how much is frankly applied ornament? 
The demand is constantly for something different. So instead 
of evolving something from our inner worst consciences, 
we dip here and there through the past in search of the motifs 
— and adapt these — even aping the crude drawing and making 
these limitations of the workers ours. It is one thing to study, 
for the sake of pure knowledge and inspiration, the products 
of the past. It is wholly different to cull from the past, 




copy characteristics and fall into the crude drawing which 
was the result of limitations which are not ours. 

What trend has our ambition taken and where will it 
lead? Certainly not to a characteristic type of decorated 
pottery and porcelain for the museums of the future, if each 
succeeding year finds us facing backwards trying to absorb 
the characteristics of a different race. True, America is a 
melting pot and perhaps we will have to exhaust the past 
before we can fuse the result into a homogeneous mass. 
American architecture went through all this process of assimi- 
lation before evolving anything characteristic. Evolution 
moves slowly and sometimes "steady by jerks;" just now we 
are on the lower round of the spiral and it takes an optimist 
to see that we are moving forward. So while I rant I try to 
think that all this experimenting is a part of the game. Some 
day we'll tire of copying the "ancients" and face about and 
try to evolve something from our innermost shrines. There 
are "hidden fields" unexplored within each of us — we have 
access to the "Realm of Ideas." Let us not forget this — nor 
what we have learned of the underlying principles which govern 
the " orderly arrangment of an idea." Let us not forget to be 
architects and in building let us remind ourselves that the 
real inspiration comes from within — all outside inspiration is 
only supplementary. And furthermore let us not forget that 
we once learned to draw and were proud of the achievement 
and that we have not the excuse of limitation that primitive 
folk had. We have access to everything which should make 
for good draughtsmanship and technical excellence. Sim- 
plicity is a desirable characteristic but simplicity is not crudity 
The curve is still the "line of beauty" and the laws of harmony 
remain the same. Nature still supplies us with motifs and 
suggests laws of construction. The age in which we work is 
vastly in advance of any other. We are on an eminence from 
which we can view the past. Let us not lose ourselves in 
contemplation but remember we are the accumulated result 
of all that is past and should have a tale of our own to tell for 
posterity. 

All art, as a part of civilization, is in a chaotic transitional 
stage. Emotion is for the moment rampant. Modernism 
so called is not so much modernism as a temporary reversion 
to barbarism — to the primitive. It's a convulsion — but it 
will pass and then we'll have to take stock and see what is 
left that is sane, wholesome and constructive. It is not a 
bad idea to take a pre-inventory survey once in a while, it 
keeps us level. 

K K 

DESIGN UNIT— BUTTERFLIES 

THE unit of butterflies shown this month is adaptable to 
many shapes, but will be found especially suitable 
for bowls, where from three to five units may be used on the 
outside and held together by color 
bands and abstract lines. One unit 
may be used in the bottom of the bowl 
and a smaller abstract border near the 
edge with color band and edge of 
bowl in color. The design will be most 
effective in enamels but can also be 
treated with lustres of brilliant hues. 
If done in enamels it will not need 
the fired black outline, but if in 
lustres or flat color the outline should be used. Butterflies 
are of such brilliant and varied hues that one can hardly go 
amiss if one's sense of color harmony has been developed. 
Next month I shall show adaptations of this unit to different 
shapes with variations of the theme. 




no 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




even in the mildest way. Each is an attractively written 
book gotten up in a way to impart information in a pleasant 
manner. Modern decorators who are using lustre to any 
extent might find the first valuable as a historical background 
to their work. Those painters who are going in for glass 
decoration — and anyone who is at all farsighted may be de- 
pended upon to do that— will no doubt be interested in the 
| book of old glass. This applies only to the class of painter 
who wishes to mix a little idealism with her oils and turpen- 
tine, not to the other who desires "nothing but designs," as 
if she were a dressmaker who ordered patterns at a counter 
and never bothered to put any originality into her work. 

"Remember that a true work of art is that which has 
pleased the greatest number of people for the longest period of 
time; that the love of beauty indicates our highest intellectual 
plane, and that if you will express to your fellow sinners bur- 
dened with life's cares, something of the enthusiasm of your 
own life, and will assist them to see their mother earth through 
your own eyes in constantly increasing beauty, . . . you 
will confer upon them one of the greatest blessings which fall 
to their lot on this mundane sphere." — F. Hopkinson SmithJ\ 



AZTEC MOTIF 

Suggested by Mexican 
Hieroglyphs 

Esther A. Coster 

CIRST Fire — Tint entire surface with a soft yellowish grey, 
* using Neutral Grey with a little Yellow Brown. Second 
Fire — Lightest value, same color as the ground a trifle darker. 
Light value, grey green, using equal parts Celadon and Neutral 
Grey. Darkvalue. Bands, Yellow Brown strong. Scroll figures, 
old blue, using part Royal Blue and 3 parts Neutral Grey. 
Darkest value, Black. Enamels are effective for this style of 
decoration. Suitable for vases, lamps, or other upright pieces. 

*• «r 

LUNCHEON SET IN PINK ROSES (Page U6) 
Ida Nowels Cochran 
r I A RACE conventional part of design on the china with 
J- transfer paper. Plates to be divided into three parts 

and one motif to be on each side of creamer, sugar, teapot and 
cups. Sketch in roses and paint with Aulich's Rosa with Copen- 
hagen Blue for shadows. Leaves in Yellow Green, Olive 
Green, Dark Green and Copenhagen Blue. Background of 
naturalistic panel Lemon Yellow, Copenhagen Blue and Dark 
Green. Now outline conventional design in 2 parts Copen- 
hagen Blue and 1 part Copenhagen Grey. Fire. Tint long 
panels in 2 parts Copenhagen Blue and 1 part Copenhagen 
Grey. Retouch naturalistic panels in same colors as for first 
fire. Rim edges of plates. Fire. 

THE BOOK SHELF 

Anita Grey Chandler 
Collecting Old Lustre Ware. By W. Bosanbeo. (George H. 
Doran Company, N. Y.) Collecting Old Glass. By J. 
H. Yoxall. (George H. Doran Company, N. Y.). Collect- 
ing Old Miniatures. By J. H. Yoxall. (George H. Doran 
Company, N. Y.) Looking over these three little volumes is 
enough to make one quit work and fly to the nearest antique 
shop available, more especially if one happens to be a collector 




KERAMIC STUDIO 



in 




KATHRYN E. CHERRY - - - p AGE Editor 

Marina Building, St. Louis, Mo. 

ENAMEL OR DRY DUSTING ON BELLEEK 

ENAMELS treatment — Birds are Peacock Green. Leaves 
Leaf Green. Stems Blue Green. Berries Wistaria. 
Dusting Colors — Stems and leaves, Mode. Bird, Dove 
Grey. Berries, Lemon Yellow and Ivory Glaze. 





CUP AND SAUCER 

Alleyne C. Webber 

OIL the two large grey spaces and dust with Glaze for Green. 
The outlined section is Gold omitting the outline mak- 
ing a flat band of gold between the outline, also a gold band 
near the edge of both cup and saucer. In the two small 
openings in outlined section paint equal parts Yellow Green 
and Bright Green. 




*#•:%# 






ENAMEL OR DRY DUSTING ON BELLEEK— KATHRYN E. CHERRY 



H2 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




THE LINEN PAGE. 

JETTA EHLERS - - - - - - Page Editor 

i 8 East Kinney Street, Newark, N. J. 

MENTION has been made at various times on this page 
of the lovely foreign linens, especially the Italian. Think- 
ing that many who have been reading these "linen chats" 
might be interested, a particularly fine example is shown in 
this month's illustration. Considered as a design problem, 
observe the beautiful spacing, the variety in the width of the 
bands and their relation to each other, in which the finest 
sense of proportion has been used. The pattern of the wide 
border is so rich and well balanced. Note also how fine the 
narrow border is in dark and light. The runner or towel, 
which it really is, is forty-three inches in length and seventeen 
inches wade. The wide border is three inches in width, and 
the narrow one is a half-inch. The open work border at the 
top of the hem is also one-half inch wide. The sides have a 
very narrow hem, and all the hems are finished by a row of 
Italian hemstitch. The design is outlined with a fine stitch, 
and the entire background is filled with the finest cross-stitch, 
leaving the design unworked save for the outline. The thread 
used for this was a fine soft linen one of a lovely blue. It is 
doubtful if anything of the sort can be had in this country. 

A split floss might come the nearest, using one thread. 
Whether this would wash well I can't say, nor would it have 
the quality of the linen thread. Still it is worth trying. When 
one has seen this wonderful Italian cross-stitch, it becomes 
difficult to accept much one sees of the other sort. So beauti- 
fully done is it, the stitches so small and exact, the back of 
the work so even that it is almost as interesting as the right 
side. All of it far removed from the commonplace kind we 
are all familiar with. A piece such as this is full of suggestion 
and inspiration to any needle-worker, and that is one of the 
reasons it is shown. Can't you see a lovely set of cloth and 
napkins developed from it? Napkins with the narrow border 
and the hemstitch, and the cloth finished in the same manner. 
Perhaps introducing a group of the birds in some interesting- 
way. Of course work of this character takes longer to exe- 
cute than most of the things shown on this page. 

One has the satisfaction however, of doing a decidedly 
"worth-while" thing. The question is often asked "are these 
things bad?" "These things" being the regulations so called 
"art store" linens, the eyelet embroidered, scalloped edged, 



padded flower be-decked variety every one so well knows. 
Of course anything that is very well done has some merit, 
but when you consider that work of the kind just mentioned 
has absolutely no individuality, and is commonplace to the 
last degree, the above question is answered for the artist who 
above all else aims for self-expression. So you see if we want 
to have really fine and distinctively individual things, we must 
work away from the stereotyped things of the shops. There 
is so much beauty to be found in simple materials, simply 
used, that one should consider well before attempting the 
more elaborate, and be very sure the labor involved is to be 
well repaid for in the finished result. 

During the last month a most interesting piece of old 
linen came to my attention. A little group of congenial souls 
took a motor trip into the "Pennsylvania Dutch" country in 
the late summer. It would take a large volume to hold all 
the tale of this venturing forth, or to half tell of the treasures 
discovered and acquired. One of them was the linen piece 
referred to. This is a guest room towel. Not the tiny thing 
we all know by that name, usually so over-elaborate the aver- 
age guest quails at using it, but a long narrow affair which 
was hung on the door in the guest chamber. It was the 
greatest breach of etiquette to use this, its chief mission being 
apparently to blazon forth the house-wife's ability as a needle- 
worker. This one had the alphabet done in cross-stitch 
across the upper part, the colors being red and a very dark 
blue. Below this was the name of the worker and the date, 
presumably when the piece was finished. Then came quaint 
figures of a man and woman and several geometrical ornaments. 
Across the bottom were the numerals, all the work being done 
in cross-stitch. It was suspended by little tape loops at the 
upper corners and measured fully a yard and a quarter in 
length and was about sixteen inches wide. Really a sort of 
magnified sampler yet called a towel. These old needle- 
workers had the right feeling for they did truly express them- 
selves in these quaint things. 

Each piece was individual and in many collections one 
would rarely find two pieces alike. Perhaps some reader 
has a bed room furnished in colonial style and what would 
make it more complete than one of these "guest-room towels" 
hung upon the door. It would be great fun working up a 
design, with much studying of old samplers and the like. 

Almost anyone can unearth a bit of home-spun linen for 
the purpose. Perhaps one of grandmother's linen sheets might 
be sacrificed for the cause. A worn place or perchance a hole 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



113 



is a real salve for one's conscience as the scissors commit the 
sacrilege. One may find many beautiful stitches on the old 
samplers and so a study of them is profitable. We have much 
in this country because of the large influx of foreign people. 
A most remarkable exhibition of woven and handworked arti- 
cles was shown by our Newark Museum last winter, called 
"Homelands Exhibition." The children in the public schools 
were asked to interest their parents and there was a most 
generous response. Out of ninety thousand school children 
about seventy per cent, are foreign so there was a great wealth 
of material to draw upon. Treasures from the old' country 
many of them brought over years ago were shown. A spin- 
ning wheel, a large wool wheel and a loom were exhibited. 
A weaver operated the loom at stated hours and was usually 
surrounded by an|interested throng. One late afternoon a 
little old lady came in with her grandchild by the hand, 
She moved from case to case looking at the various objects, 
until her progress about the room brought her to the spin- 
ning wheel. In an instant her aged face was aglow, and 
ejaculating something in an unknown tongue, regardless of 
the attendants or the "hands off" sign, she slipped under the 
ropes, and in a twinkling her foot was on the treadle and the 



wheelwhirring as she held the bit of flax between her knotted 
fingers. No one stopped her, and in joy she sat there and spun. 
The wheel had bridged the space between the present and 
those old days back in the far off homeland, and once more 
she was the happy young peasant woman of the long ago. 
The Museum people became much interested in her and each 
day during the rest of the exhibit she came and spun to the 
delight of thousands of people who visited the galleries. 

Perhaps here is an idea for you in your home town. Ar- 
range an exhibit of samplers and handwoven things and if 
you want to charge admission give the proceeds to the Red 
Cross for their great work. 

JARDINIERE 

Ada Maud Chapin 

IN the design for the Belleek jardiniere I have shown the 
one panel, or one-sixth. I used Miss Mason's Relief 
Enamels, soft Austrian Blue, for all darks, Emerald Green soft 
for medium tone. Flowers, Chinese Rose soft, with small por- 
tion of Best White Enamel. Center of flowers, Imperial 
Yellow soft. 




JARDINIERE— ADA MAUD CHAPIN 



iu 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




MRS. VERNIE LOCKWOOD WILLIAMS - Page Editor 

University of Pittsburg. Home Studio, 52 W. Maiden St., Washington, Pa. 

DESIGN FOR CHOP PLATE 

THIS design made from the bell flower is for a 14 inch chop 
plate. The plate is tinted all over with Copenhagen 
Grey and fired. The design is then applied, being very care- 
ful to have an accurate tracing. The dark parts are painted 
in very carefully with Royal Blue, then dusted. The medium 
tones are painted with Copenhagen Grey toned with Royal 
Blue and dusted with the same. Outlines of dark blue after 
the dusted color is thoroughly dry. If this is carefully ap- 
plied two fires should be sufficient, but if a third fire is neces- 
sary re-paint with the same colors but do not dust again. 
This design may be adapted to a great many shapes. 






DESIGN FOR CHOP PLATE— MRS. VERNIE L. WILLIAMS 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



115 



BEGINNERS' CORNER 

JESSIE M. BARD ------ p AGE Editor 

Dickinson Seminary, Williamsport, Pa. 

TEA TILE— WILD ASTERS 

OIL entire surface of tile with Special Medium for Dusting, 
pad this until it tacks and let it stand an hour or more, 
the length of time depends on the amount of oil that was 
applied, the length of time it was padded and weather condi- 
tions. This can only be learned by experience. It should be 
watched so it does not become too dry or it will not take the 
color. Dust this with 3 parts Pearl Grey, 1-5 part Yellow 
Brown and 1-5 Dark Grey. 

Second Fire — Trace design and outline with a fine line 
of India ink. Oil the flowers and outer band and dust 2 Water 
Blue and 1 Banding Blue. Oil the remaining dark tone and 
dust with 3 Water Green No. 2 and 1 Bright Green. Oil 
the light tone and center of flower and dust with 3 Bright 
Green and i Water Green No. 2. Straighten all edges with 
a pointed orange stick and clean off all extra particles of color 



and then dust over the entire surface with Ivory Glaze, this 
will clean off all loose particles. When fired all colors should 
blend well together, if they do not a wash of the necessary 
color to tone them down may be added. 

j* & 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

M. L. S. — / would like to know what you could do to Satsuma so it would 
hold water? 

If it is a surface that is not easily seen apply a coat of white shellac and 
allow it to dry thoroughly and then apply another one. If it is a bowl or 
an open space line it with enamel. 

Mrs. B. R. — Should you have a standard -price list for firing kindly send me. 

We have no list — some of the prices are: bread and butter plates 5c, 
8§ and 9 inch plates 10c. Large cake plates 15c, cups and saucers 10c. 
Steins 15c. Large tankards 50c Other pieces can be gauged from these 
according to amount of room they occupy in the kiln. Prices for Belleek and 
Satsuma wares are a little higher for they take more space in the kiln since 
they cannot be stacked up. 

S. M. H. — What is the definition of "White Gold" and "Virgin Gold?" 

White Gold is the same as silver. We are not familiar with the Virgin 
Gold. 





TEA TILE, WILD ASTERS— JESSIE M. BARD 



116 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




KERAMIC STUDIO 



117 



GLASS ENAMEL DECORATION 

Marie A. Frick 

MY first article treated of transparent colors entirely. We 
will now combine these with White Enamel No. 649, 
and make them opaque, and to resemble in part decorated 
china. 

With enamel there is a much broader field, comprising 
principally flowers, but fruit, birds, butterflies, and small con- 
ventional designs can be used. 

Now the trouble that so many have in using the enamel 
colors is the blistering, or boiling which takes place in the firing. 
I had no end of trouble with the ready mixed enamels, and 
discarded them entirely. However, I may not have tried 
out all of the different makes. But the same results are ob- 
tained with a certainty in the use of white enamel to which 
are added any of the transparent colors, in the proportion 
of only about 1-16 part color, as the colors thus mixed come 
out darker, and the dreaded blistering is quite overcome by 
the use of Demar Varnish and turpentine. 

I will here demonstrate a design. Outline a clump of 
three small double roses with china white, on a piece of crystal 
glass. Take one of your small slabs, and mix the white enamel 
pure with Demar varnish, and thin with turpentine, using 
the latter frequently to keep it from drying. Take a square 



shader well charged with the enamel, and completely cover 
the whole roses with as much as it will hold, and do it as quickly 
as possible. Then let this dry before you color them with 
pink, and while you are waiting for this to dry, finish the im- 
mediate background surrounding them by using transparent 
colors for green leaves and stems, etc. If you want large 
roses, say an inch in diameter, I would suggest putting the 
leaves in with white enamel and light green mixed. 

By the time you have laid in the greens around the roses, 
the latter will be dry enough to finish with color. So take any 
pink, say Carmine No. 4-7, and thin this as usual, with fat oil 
and turpentine, and work with lavender oil. Shade the roses 
on the white enamel, with pink, just as you would on china, 
but very thinly applied Mix your greens also as for china. 

In doing a white daisy, raise the petals all with white 
enamel, put the seed pod in with Albert Yellow and enamel 
mixed. Then shade the shadow side of the daisy with grey 
black. You can -give the extreme high lights an extra touch 
of white enamel, which will add to the effect. All this needs 
but one firing. 

I find the glassware more repellent than china. With 
regard to the Roman gold, it would either peel off in places, 
if too heavily applied, or the glass shows through if thinly put 
on. So I always add a drop or two of the Liquid Bright Gold, 
after the Roman Gold is mixed, and it works like a charm. 




CUP AND SAUCER— E. W. TALLY 

Outline and center of oval is 2 Yellow Green and 1 Apple Green, also the white bars. Remainder 

of design is Green Gold. 



JJ8 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




GRAPES— MARION L. FOSDICK 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



H9 




BREAKFAST SET IN BLACK AND RED (Color Study)— ALBERT W. HECKMAN 

THIS is to be done in black and red enamels. If one does 
not care for black on one's tableware another color may 
be used. A dark blue such as a Nankin Blue or a Canton 
Blue with Emerald Green would give a very good effect. The 
shape of the saucer in the colored illustration is not always to 



be had but the design can be altered to fit the shape used, as it 
was done in the ones illustrated in the photograph. 

Plain overglaze colors may be used instead of enamels if 
a hard china is used. Mix and apply them thin as you would 
a hard enamel. 




CREAMER AND SUGAR OF BREAKFAST SET— ALBERT W. HECKMAN 



120 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




FISH PLATE— ADELINE MORE 



FISH are painted with a wash of Albert Yellow around the 
eyes and mouth and the remainder of body with a thin 
wash of Copenhagen Blue and Shading Green. The darker 
touches are of the same color used heavier with touches of 
Violet and a little Blood Red on the half hidden fish, on the 
part which touches the other fish also on fins and in narrow part 
of the body of the large fish . Outline around fins, mouth and the 
eyes are Dark Brown and Dark Grey. The dark marking 
under fin is Yellow Brown. Lighter tone in shells is white and 
shading is Dark Brown, Violet and Blood Red. Center of shell 



is Violet and Blood Red with darkest touches of Banding Blue 
and Copenhagen Blue. Two smaller shells under fish are a 
thin wash of Blood Red and a little Violet and shaded with 
a heavier wash of same and the darkest touches of Deep Purple 
and a little Blood Red. The light water tone is Apple Green 
next to fish and shaded to Albert Yellow toward edge of plate. 
Dark tones are Shading Green and Copenhagen Blue and dark 
tones around edge of plate are Copenhagen Blue and Violet. 
Sky tone is a thin wash of Yellow Brown near water and blended 
into Albert Yellow and a little Dark Grey. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



121 




COSMOS— MARION L. FOSDICK 



122 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



B. F. DRAKENFELD & CO. 

(Incorporated) 

CHINA COLORS 

Overglaze and Underglaze 



GLASS COLORS 

For Table Ware and Window Glass Decoration 



OXIDES, CHEMICALS and CLAYS 

For Pottery and Tile Manufacture 



PREPARED GLAZES 



GOLD AND SILVER PREPARATIONS 



All Requisites for Decorating 



Catalogue on Request 

50 Murray St., New York, N. Y. 



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BEST KILNS BUILT 

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KEROSENE OIL 

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For Firing 
POTTERY, TILES, GLAZES, 

Etc. 



ADAPTED FOR 
EDUCATIONAL 

AND TECHNICAL 
PURPOSES 



B. F. DRAKENFELD & CO. Inc. 

50 Murray St., New York, N. Y. 

ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE MAILED ON REQUEST 



HALL'S 

SUPERIOR GOLDS 

FOR CHINA AND GLASS 

PUT UP IN SEALED BOXES OR IN GLASS JARS 



PLEASE NOTE! 

FIRED TESTS OF HALL'S GOLD 

in comparison with other Ceramic Golds always 

DEMONSTRATES ITS SUPERIORITY 



OUR FAMOUS UNIQUE GOLD 

IS SPECIALLY ADAPTED 

FOR GLASS DECORATION 

AND IS NOW PUT UP BOTH ON GLASS SLABS AND JN PANS 

Single Box 50 cents One dozen $4.75 

SEND FOR OUR CATALOG 



ESTABLISHED 

UPWARDS 




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FORTY YEARS 



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1211 West Lehigh Avenue, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

SUCCESSOR TO JAS. F. HALL 

DEALER IN ALL MATERIALS FOR CHINA DECORATION 



THE CHERRY COLORS 

Colors for Painting and Tinting 
Special Colors for Dusting 

THE MOST POPULAR ENAMELS 
ON T HE MA RKET 

Send for Complete Price List 
The Robineau Pottery, Syracuse, N. Y. 



GLASS COLORS ! 

GOLD AND SILVER 
FOR GLASS 



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When writing to advertisers please mention this magazine 




SUBSCRIBERS 



Book of 
Cups is Saucers 




■CERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING C 



A REMARKABLE BOOK OF 

Soon to be withdrawn ! 
50 per cent Discount on the 



iC 



«C 



CC 



CC 



W TO SUBSCRIBERS ONLY ! *«f 

Regular Price. 

Class Room No. 1. Art of Teaching, etc., $3.00 

No. 2. Flower Painting, etc., 3.00 

No. 3. Figure Painting, etc., 3.00 

No. 4. Conventional Decoration, etc. 3.00 

IitfleThtarf9toMake,S!L!^^^^^ 2.00 

Book of Cups and Saucers, 1 .50 

SPECIAL NOTICE — We cannot deliver these books post paid at these prices, therefore add 15 cents for each book ordered 

THIS IS AN OPPORTUNITY 
OPEN TO ALL SUBSCRIBERS OF KERAMIC STUDIO. 

JW* Either New or Renewal. 
KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO., SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



I f 



® 



<gft 



&) 



@ 



I 



(G 



Glass Decoration 
Design 




Good designs which will not be awarded prizes 
will be purchased. 

Designs should be applied to any of the shapes from 



COMPETITION OPEN TO ALL. 






© 

© 
© 



^ *-«w Annn m-r,rv*T-»Tw vn-B-m -* *,* -» -* ^-* — © 



CLOSES NOVEMBER 15th. 1917 



* © 

. © 



1 First Prize - - - $10 1 

I Second Prize - - 5 | 

© I 



© 
© 



I the United States Glass Co., or the Cambridge Glass 
I Works, published in August Keramic Studio (page 67) 

© Designs should be sent flat with name and address of 

designer on back. 



© 



Designs should be in black and white, with a color © 

© sketch of one section, if the design is conventional, or © 

© ti 1 © 

© a written treatment in glass colors. © 

© © 



iSl 



© 
© 



KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO., 

SYRACUSE, N. Y. © 

§)©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©© 



The entire contents of this Magazine are covered by the general copyright and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 



CONTENTS OF DECEMBER, 1917 



Editorial 

Butterfly Unit 

Hand Decorated Beads 

Palm Jar and Tray, Camel Design 

Vase in Dogwood Leaves 

Plant Analysis 

Plant Analysis 

Beginners' Corner 

Border for Child's Set 

Border for Dinner Set 

Conventionalized Bitter Sweet (Color Study) 

Answers to Correspondents 

Plate 

Cold Cream Box 

Bowl 

Glass Decorations 

Plate 

Plate Border and Honey Jar 

Russian Motif 

Tea Set, Butterfly Design 

Conventional Border for Flower Vase 

Bird Vase 

Rose Vase 

Bon Bon Box 



Henrietta Barclay Paist 
Ida Diana Ekbergh 
Alice B. Sharrard 
Mrs. F. C. McGaughy 
Florence Wyman Whitson 
Mrs. Vernie L. Williams 
Jessie M. Bard 
May Belle Cheney 

C. L. Chamberlain 
M. H. Watkeys 

J. O. Balda 
lone Wheeler 
Albert W. Heckman 

D. M. Campana 
Mary L. Brigham 
EliseW. Tally 
Esther A. Coster 
Annie Southerne Tardy 
Lola Alberta St. John 
May E. Reynolds Judson 
Kathryn E. Cherry 
Mrs. F. H. Hanneman 



Page 
123 
124-125 
126 
127 
128 
128 
129 
130 
130 
130 
130 
130 
130 
131 
131 
132 
132 
133 
133 
134 
134 
135 
135 
136 




THE OLD RELIABLE 



FITCH KILNS 



T^HESE KILNS have been in fsuccessful use 
for over 40 years and are today known for 

the excellence of the firing results as well as their 

low first production 
cost — low firing cost 
and low cost for up- 
keep and repairs. 





We will send circulars and 

prices promptly 

on request. 



GASJKIL 



STEARNS FITCH & CO., 
SPRINGFIELD, OHIO. 

1875-1817 



THESE BOOKS SENT POST-PAID 
ON RECEIPT OF PRICE 

Mrs. Filkin's A. B. C. for Beginners in China Painting $1.00 

How to apply Enamels by Mabel C. Dibble 60 

Book on Methods for painting in Water Color by Gertrude Eatabrook 1.00 

Colors and Coloring in China Painting _ ™. M 

Lunn'i Practical Pottery, 2 vols, (or vols, sold singly $2.15 each) 4.00 

The Teacher of China Painting by D.M. Campana.... 79 

Firing China and Glass by Campana ~ 37 

Book of Monograms by Campana — _ - 42 

Books 2 and 3 "Decorative Designs," by Campana, each 83 

'Water Color Painting," Designs by Campagna, . .53 

'The Teacher of Oil Painting," Designs by Campana 63 

Flat Enamel Decoration in China by Mrs. L. T. Steward 1.25 

Home Furnishing by Alice M. Kellogg (Pub. at 1.50) .75 

The Human Figure by Vanderpool __ 2.00 

Marks of American Potters by E. A. Barber 2.26 

American Glassware, Old and New 1.00 

Grand Feu Ceramics 5.00 

The Fruit Book 3.00 

The Rose Book 3.00 

The Art of Teaching China Decoration, Class Room No. 1 3.00 

Flower Painting on Porcelain, Class Room No. 2 3.00 

Figure Painting on Porcelain and Firing, Class Room No. 3 3.00 

Conventional Decoration of Pottery and Porcelain, Class Room No. 4.. 3.00 

Book of Cups and Saucers 1-50 

Book of Little Things to Make 2.00 

Keramic Decorations Nellie F. Mcintosh. 1.00 

Eberlein & McClure's "Practical Book of Early Amaican Arts and 

Crafts," post paid, net 600 

"Handicrafts for the Handicapped" by Herbert J. Hall and Mertice M. 

C. Buck, post paid •■ 1-35 

Pottery for Artists, Craftsmen and Teachers by Geo. J. Cox, 1.35 

Deeien and the Decoration of Porcelain, by Henrietta Barclay Paist 

8 Paper Cover $1.50 Cloth Cover $2.50 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 



When writing to advertisers please mention this magazine 



Vol. XIX, No. 8. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



December 1917 




VERY gratifying feature for us in 
past weeks has been the compara- 
tive rarity of criticisms of the Kera- 
mic Studio designs. We have re- 
ceived a remarkable number of let- 
ters from subscribers who testify em- 
phatically their appreciation of the 
Magazine. These have come in un- 
usually large numbers and with many 

I promises of help in spreading the 

gospel of individual effort in designing— i. e. putting something 
of themselves into their work. They are good omens for the 
future and heartening to the Editors. 

We do not mean of course that we have not received any 
criticisms. We always do and we like it and we try to profit 
by it. The great difficulty is that these criticisms never agree. 
The designs which certain decorators like are precisely those 
which others object to. In matters of this kind opinions 
and tastes vary and will always vary. We realize very well 
that the designs we publish will not satisfy everybody, but 
we try as much as we can to give only work which, however 
open to criticism it may be, has some merit in it, and we 
would like to see more indulgence shown by some critics 
who are so outspoken in their condemnation of the things they 
do not like that they give the impression that they alone are 
infallible. But are their own designs always perfect, admit- 
ting that there is such a thing as a perfect design, and is there 
nothing to leam, no good suggestion to get even from a design 
one finds imperfect in some way? 

However we have received lately from a prominent deco- 
rator a criticism which* seems to us to contain a good deal of 
truth, it is that there seems to be an unfortunate tendency to 
carry conventionalisation to the extreme and to indulge too 
much in purely abstract designs, and that there is much need 
for more simplicity and sincerity. This does not mean that 
abstract conventionalizations should be taboo, but that they 
should not be abused. 



THE BOOK SHELF 



« K 

When looking for new sources of china supply for the 
future, let us not forget English china. Much of that ware 
would be suitable for amateur work, but before the war, for 
reasons of their own, the English potteries have refused to 
send us white china. Now that they are preparing to develop 
in all possible ways their oversea trade after the war, they 
may very well change their mind. We are writing on this 
subject to Dr. J. W. Mellor, County Potteries Laboratories, 
Staffordshire, England, a very influential man among potters, 
who himself produces a very good china with felspathic glaze, 
but individual letters may not have much effect. We suggest 
that the Clubs and dealers all over the country write to him, 
calling his attention to the possibilities in the white china 
trade for decorators after the war. Concerted action will tell 
where individual action might fail. 

if *r 

STUDIO NOTE 

Mrs. A. E. Wright, of Chicago, is now starting on a south- 
ern trip into Oklahoma and Texas for the Coover studios. 



"Historic | Silver of the Colonies [and !lts Makers." By 
Francis Hill Bigelow. The Macmillan Co. $6.00. 

In a thick volume, packed as full of delectable illustrations 
as an English Christmas pudding is of plums, Francis Hill 
Bigelow has told the story of the early American silversmiths. 
and their wares. Mr. Bigelow's style is decidedly chatty, 
even gossipy, as he describes a particularly quaint tea-pot, 
porringer, or candle-stick. Not only is the object faithfully 
delineated, but information is given as to its maker, its owner, 
with enlivening bits of family history en passant, and its sub- 
sequent journey down through the years, from one descendant 
to another of the original possessor, to its final resting place 
in some museum or private collection. Such interesting 
colonial pieces as Beakers, Candle-cups, Flagons, Baptismal 
Basins, Patens and Salvers, Candlesticks, Snuffers, Dram Cups, 
Tasters, Tea Urns, Spout Cups, Snuff Boxes, Sugar Boxes 
(in use when sugar was even more expensive than it is now), 
Nutmeg Boxes, and Punch Bowls, are made familiar to the 
reader. A number of pieces by our popular hero, Paul Revere, 
are shown. We learn that this talented and patriotic gentle- 
man not only evolved beautiful silver objects but that he also 
filled teeth; in fact, it was he who ministered in a dental capa- 
city to General Washington himself while in Boston. Mr. 
Bigelow has long been a lover of old silver, and it is to him 
credit is due for the various silver exhibits at the Boston Museum 
of Fine Arts within the last ten or twelve years. It is 
evident that the author has enjoyed compiling his book, and 
it is to be expected that each reader will share his pleasure. 

It should be noted that there are valuable illustrations of 
early American church silver,Uncluding Protestant, Catholic 
and Jewish. 

"On Collecting Japanese Color-Prints." By Basil Stewart. 
Dodd,MeadandCo. 

This is truly an art book in every sense. It is artistically 
illustrated and printed, at the same time giving sound advice 
as to the identifying and collecting of Japanese color prints. 
One is told precisely how these fascinating pictures were made. 
To quote from the book itself: "Old Japanese color-prints are 
printed on a sheet of mulberry-bark paper and are the product 
of three different craftsmen; the artist who drew the original 
design, the block-maker or engraver who transferred the de- 
sign to the wood, and the printer. A block was cut for each 
color in addition to the outline or key-block. The drawing 
made by the artist, with whose name alone the print is generally 
associated, was done in India ink, with a brush on very thin 
paper. This was passed to the engraver, who pasted it, face 
downwards, on the wood-block (wild cherry wood) and, cut- 
ting through the paper, transferred the outline to the block, 
afterwards removing the superfluous wood between the lines 
with chisels and gouges, and so producing an accurate negative 
in high relief. Prints which are very early impressions from 
the block often show the mark of the cutting tools and the 
grain of the wood. The artist's design was therefore des- 
troyed, a fact which should be borne in mind when offered a 
drawing of which prints are known to exist, thus proving it to 
be a reproduction." 

Each of these books might well be given to some art-loving 
friend for Christmas. — A. G. C. 



124 

MRS. HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST 

2298 Commonwealth Ave., St. Paul, Minn. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 

Page Editor 



BUTTERFLY UNIT 
r I ^HE treatments for adaptations of the Butterfly unit shown 
A here were suggested last month when the unit was given. 
Butterflies are of such varied colorings, some delicate, some 
brilliant, some iridescent, metallic. They include every imag- 
inable color scheme and can be treated in any way consistent 
with the object of the piece decorated. They are most effective 
in metals and lustre against an etched background, outlined 
and accented with black. They also give unlimited oppor- 
tunity for the display of enamels and gold, with color band. 
These designs can be adapted to many shapes besides these 
shown. The theme is an old one but of endless variety and 
will I hope stimulate some to original effort. 



ART NOTES 

The annual exhibition of Minneapolis Artists which 
opened November 3d at the Art Institute included two 
large cases of decorated porcelains, the work of the Minne- 
apolis members of the Twin City Keramic Club. Like every 
other department of art the work this year as a whole did not 
quite measure up to past standards. This is in part due to the 
fact that local workers are more and more sending their work 
to the Exhibits in Chicago and New York and also to the 
tremendous outside demands on everyone, which has limited 
the artistic output. 

There were some charming small things and several very 
ambitious pieces in the highly colored and extreme decorative 




FULL SIZE BORDER OF BOWL 

style so popular for the past few years. Judging from the 
comments of both jury and spectators the demand for this 
type of work, especially on porcelain, is on the wane, and a 
return to the less spectacular color scheme will be welcomed. 
We have had our color carnival and enjoyed it, but the emotional 
stimulus has been a severe strain and some of us are turning 
to the more restful things for an antidote. 



^£g^g^ 




BOWL AND INSIDE BORDER— HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



125 




DESIGN FOR BOWL 

It is to be regretted that china decorators, even those who 
have devoted much time to the study of design and color, have 
fallen into the indolent habit of using designs of others or 
imitating certain types of decoration, foreign to their individ- 
ual style, just because certain talented artists have made a 
particular type of work popular. They are thereby sinking 
into the imitative class and losing the opportunity of cultivat- 
ing their own talents. Work of any pronounced type loses 
its original charm by being worked over, reproduced or imi- 
tated by others and in time loses all of the vitality and charm 
of the original. One of the most charming pieces shown was 
a small Belleek bowl done in Turquoise Blue enamel and silver 
on an etched background. The piece was the work of Mrs. 
Richard Lavell, and was charming in design and color and 
excellent in technique. It was a duplicate of one which has 
just received the Atlan prize at the Chicago Art Institute. 
This makes the fourth consecutive year for this prize to come 
to Minneapolis and should stimulate Minneapolis artists to 



try to live up to the reputation gained by these serious workers. 
Mrs. Lavell work is always original and has a distinctive 
charm and never fails to catch the eye of a discerning art critic. 

BOWL (Page 131) 

Albert W. Heckman 

THIS bowl design was made to be carried out in two tones 
of yellow, two tones of grey and dark blue. The flowers 
are Light Yellow for Dusting with centers and buds of Deep 
Yellow. The dark bands and spots on the leaves are Dark 
Blue for Dusting and all the rest of the design is in grey. 

First Fire — Oil in all the grey in the design and dust. 
Then oil in the flowers and dust with Light Yellow. 

Second Fire — Oil in the design in the centers of flowers 
and buds and dust with Deep Yellow. Also oil in the dark 
bands and dark spots and dust with Dark Blue. 

Third Fire — Give the whole bowl a very light wash of 
grey and clean out the buds and flowers. 

A very satisfactory color scheme in enamels for this design 
on a Belleek bowl is in Persian Red, Chinese Blue and Chinese 
Pink. Use the Chinese Pink and Persian Red for the flowers. 
Use Persian Red for. all the buds and use Chinese Blue for all 
the bands and leaves. 




FULL SIZE SECTION SERVICE PLATE 




SERVICE PLATE— HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST 



126 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



PALM JAR AND TRAY— (Page 129) 

Alice B. Sharrard 

OUTLINE all in Black. Top part of jar is Deep Chrome 
Green, also trees and connecting bands. Ground be- 
hind camel Pale Yellow Ochre, side panels Yellow Brown 
tone used with a bit of Blue Green. Ground of trees and bowl, 
Old Ivory, Camel delicate shade of Trenton Ivory. Trappings 
cover Delft Blue with Orange, Ruby Purple, Sap Green, Band- 
ing Blue and Egg Yellow in' border. Ribbons, Ruby Purple 
and Blood Red, also tassels. Conventional border: ground, 
Copenhagen Blue one part, Delft Blue one part. Figure, 
Chrome Green or Grass Green, on a ground of Orange Yellow. 
Center of figures Capucine with touch of Ruby, and Orange 
Red ground. Light figures Pale Ivory to match ground of 
jar. Gold can be used for small border in dark parts, also to 
touch up parts of the camel's trappings. Keep all colors in 
low tones except the Egyptian borders, these should be rich 
in color. This makes a charming gift for the Christmas season. 

HAND DECORATED BEADS 

Ida Diana Ekbergh 

ONE of the distinguished peculiarities of the human race, 
especially the feminine world, is its liking for personal 
adornment and eventually the love of the beautiful in any form. 
I In the early days of the Egyptian civilization the craving 
for personal adornment appears to have been satisfied by 
necklaces and bracelets of pierced shells, seeds, and very often 
sparkling pebbles and stones of unusual shape and color. 
Later on appeared marvelously decorated beads that the Egypt- 
ians were past masters in the art of stringing into necklaces. 
Hand decorated beads in America is decidedly a novelty. 
We usually find them in the Orient. The Japanese and Chinese 
produce hand wrought beads known as netsukes. These are 
used as buttons or toggles on cords with which they unite 
their garments. Many of these are made of Satsuma and 
hand decorated. 

There is no reason why we shouldn't be able to decorate 
beads in this country. I am sure that it would be possible 
to create a demand for this new American novelty. In speak- 
ing with a Japanese importer recently, whose father is a 
Satsuma potter in Japan, he told me that they would take 
orders for undecorated Satsuma beads of any size and quantity 
desired, provided a correct model was given him of the size 
of bead desired. The bead importers sell china or porcelain 
beads that could be used for this purpose, providing they will 
stand the firing. The strand of decorated beads illustrated, 
I came across in an Oriental bazaar, but I do not consider 
them as practical as the Satsuma beads would undoubtedly be. 

First of all you transfer your design to the surface of the 
bead. When this is accomplished, mount your bead on the 
point of a match, the match whittled to fit the opening of the 
bead, and thus mounted you proceed with your decoration. 
As each bead is decorated, make a little hole in the top of a 
card box into which you set your mounted bead. All of the 
beads are treated in just this way, therefore it is well to pre- 
pare your matches before hand, as many matches as you have 
beads to decorate, and too, make the same number of holes 
in the top of your card board box on which the beads are 
suspended on their "crutch" while drying. When your beads 
are thoroughly dry, string them on an asbestos cord with a 
knot in between each bead, so that the decorated beads do 
not touch one another in firing. The background of the beads 
. are ivory tone in tint, out of which rises the blue, pink, and 
violet figures with their tiny golden leaves — enamels were 
used in the decoration of these quaint looking beads. In 



firing, the beads must be suspended in the kiln and not laid 
out flat of course; an iron pole across the kiln answers the 
purpose on which to hang them. 

I might add that the most wonderful effects are produced 
with lustres on these beads. I made a necklace, using beads 
with a white background, giving several coats of Mother of 
Pearl lustre and — well, they certainly were different with a 
vengeance! 

I will be glad to answer any questions about these beads. 
Letters of inquiry should be sent to my address, 1289 Cleve- 
land Ave., St. Paul, Minn, and should enclose a postage 
stamp for answer. 




BEAD NECKLACE 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



127 




SECTION OF TRAY FOR PALM JAR 




PALM JAR AND TRAY, CAMEL DESIGN— ALICE B. SHARRARD (Treatment page 126) 



128 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




MRS. VERNIE LOCKWOOD WILLIAMS - Page Editor 

University of Pittsburg. Home Studio, 52 W. Maiden St., Washington, Pa. 

PLANT ANALYSIS (Page 129) 

FOR this problem of decorative flower arrangement a speci- 
men as simple as possible should be selected — casting- 
aside all unnecessary leaves and details. Plan against a white 
background if possible and study carefully. Sketch lightly 
allowing the pencil lines to remain as they are, simply a guide 
for form and placing. Draw with your brush as you paint 
in your sketch and by so doing gain independence of sight as 
well as marking of your brush. Study structure of your 
specimen and values, eliminating all possible detail, allowing 
only prominent veins and tendrils of leaves. In painting 
the flower commence with center adding each petal. Avery 
good suggestion is, after having your color study, to make a 
most carefully detailed drawing of the specimen. By use of 
the mirror secure an occult design within a square or rect- 
angle as No. II and III. From II and III, using two mirrors 
select an arrangement for design in circle, using one at a 
right angle and one at an acute angle. The problem for 
ogee will be given in following number. 





VASE IN DOGWOOD LEAVES 

Mrs. F. C. McGaughy 

LEAVES and stems — Gray Green, Moss Green, Shading 
Green, Brown Green. They may also be slightly tinged 
with Pompadour Red. Branches — Copenhagen Grey and Dark 
Brown. Black parts — Roman Gold. Lines — Black. Berries 
— Carnation, Yellow Brown or Green (indicating different stages 
of growth). Tips — Dark Brown. 






V 



PLANT ANALYSIS— FLORENCE WYMAN WHITSON 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



129 




PLANT ANALYSIS— MRS. VERNIE L. WILLIAMS (Treatment page 128) 



130 



KERAMIC STUDIO 





BORDER FOR CHILD'S SET— MAY BELLE CHENEY 



BEGINNERS' CORNER 



JESSIE M. BARD ------ 

Dickinson Seminary, Williamsport, Pa. 



Page Editor 



BORDER FOR CHILD'S SET 

THE outline may be omitted but if preferred use 2-3 
Copenhagen Blue and 1-3 Banding Blue and fire. 
Second Fire if ^outlined is used, or first without: Oil 
all the dark^spaces with Special Oil according to directions 
given in an earlier number of the magazine and dust with 4 
parts Grey Blue and 1 part Water Blue. If a background is 
desired oil over the entire surface including design after the 
blue has been fired, pad the oil until it is tacky and let it stand 
about an hour or less according to amount of oil used and then 
dust with 2 parts Pearl Grey, 1 of Ivory Glaze and a very little 

Grey Blue. 

♦ •> •> 

BORDER FOR DINNER SET 

OIL all except outer band lines and petals of flowers and 
dust Florentine Green. Outer bands and petals of 
flowers are Green Gold. 

CONVENTIONALIZED BITTER SWEET (Color Study) 

M. H. Watkeys 

BLACK outline may be used or omitted as preferred. Oil 
leaves and dust with 1 part Water Lily Green and 1 Pearl 
Grey. Oil light berries and dust with Yellow for Dusting, 
the next toned berries dusted with Deep Ivory and a little 
Yellow Brown and the darkest tone with Coffee Brown and 
a little. Blood Red. Black lines are painted with Black, 
Yellow bands are Roman Gold. 



BORDER FOR DINNER SET— C. L. CHAMBERLAIN 



Second Fire — -Oil grey background spaces and dust with 
3 Pearl Grey, 1 Ivory Glaze, \ Dark Grey. The grey space 
may be carried out in silver or White Gold if preferred. Oil 
Yellow background and dust with 1 Pearl Grey, 2 Ivory Glaze 
and about 1-8 part Albert Yellow. Retouch the Gold- 



ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

D. P. — 1. In Marie Frick's article in last number of Keramic Studio 
she has in list of colors a bottle of Demar Varnish. How do you use varnish in 
the Vitrifiable colors? (Glass Painting.) 

2. Can you mix the colors in glass painting? 

3. Has the cold or unfired process in glass proved satisfactory? 

4. 7s the cold process what is sometimes called jeweller's enamel? 

1. The varnish is probably used over the colors when they are dry for 
the cold process to make them hold, as she mentions fat oil in the article for 
mixing colors. 

2. Yes, colors can be mixed the same as in china painting. 

3. It is not as satisfactory as when fired for it would not wear as well. 

4. Am not sure about this but hardly think so. 

E. M. S. — 1. Do you not consider glass firing hard on the kiln? Since 
firing glass I have so much trouble with the clay dropping off from the side of the 
kiln. I use firing clay for filling cracks but it does not hold. 

2. One of the tubes is quite loose and I have wondered if there was danger 
of it dropping out during a firing? 

1. No, it is not hard on a kiln for it is fired at such a low heat. Mix a 
little liquid glass with what you have and it will hold. 

2. Plaster it well, it depends on where the crack is, if there is nothing to 
hold the tube it might drop out. 

H. L. N. — Wish to paint a dinner set using gold band and monogram. 
Is it proper to use husband's three initials A. B. C, or should the wife's initials 
be used? Her name having been Mary E. Brown before marriage would the 
proper monogram be M. B. C? 

If it is a bride her own initials are used M. E. B., but if a married woman 
her initials and her husband's, M. B. C. 




PLATE— J. O. BALDA 

Outline and bands may be Black or Gold. The flower forms are painted with a thin wash of Rose and the remaining 

dark spaces are Violet and a little Dark Grey if Gold outline is used. If outline is black paint them 

with Apple Green and a little Yellow Green and the flowers with Sea Green or Turquoise Blue. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



131 




COLD CREAM BOX 

lone Wheeler 

SATSUMA form, design in blue and green 
enamels, with or without black outline, as 
preferred. 




COLD CREAM BOX— IONE WHEELER 




BOWL— ALBERT W. HECKMAN 



(Treatment page 125) 



132 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



GLASS DECORATIONS 

D. M. Campana 

GLASS decoration is the same to-day as it was twenty years 
ago, but with the addition of several new color and lustre 
effects. There has been for a long time, both in Europe and 
America, a large quantity of glass decorated successfully, and 
it is strange that nobody ever tried to introduce this kind of 
work in the individual studios. One of the indirect results of 
the war will probably be the awakening of a permanent interest 
in this art among china decorators. 

There is, however, a great difference between china and 
glass decoration in the fact that, while china has been decorated 
in any old way, glass must be very carefully handled; in order 
to be successful, one needs extreme cleanliness and very close 
attention. In other words I do not see any future for careless 
workers in this branch of art and only attentive students will 
be financially successful. 

Some of this new decorated glass is beautiful and quite a 
revelation. The Art Institute of Chicago has given prizes for 
decorated glass. I have myself made several sets of tumblers 
with bottles to match which have attracted much attention 
not only among the general public but in art circles. 

However china decorators are generally bound to try on 
glass heavy decorations of flowers and ornaments just as they 
have been doing on china. This of course is a very bad mis- 
take, not only because this kind of decoration on glass is dif- 
ficult, but because the effect is bad and clumsy, and because 
the decoration looks entirely out of place. For my part the 
best glass, especially for table purposes, is the one shade glass, 
that is showing only one color rather of light shade. Conse- 
quently I prefer lustres of a limited number of shades to any 
other decoration. 

I will try to give a few suggestions which will help decora- 
tors in this branch of art new to them, will make it easier for 
them to make pleasing decorations, financially profitable and 
not too difficult to cam 7 out. 

But I will say first a few words about the different quali- 
ties of glass. Two kinds are to be specially considered: Lime 
Glass and Lead Glass. Glasses such as tumblers, Champagne 
glasses, in fact nearly all drinking glasses, with or without stem, 
are made of lead glass. Other pieces such as boxes, dishes, 
jars, vases, all thick glasses are made of lime glass. Manu- 
facturers call the first class Lead Blown Blass, the second Lime 
Pressed Glass. Lime glass fires at about 1000°F. and lead glass 
at about 850°F. This may vary slightly. Therefore if you 
have drinking glasses you should place them in the center of 
the muffle and the pressed glasses where the fire is hottest. 
In this way you will not risk spoiling any pieces. Later on I 
will give more explanations on the firing and placing of glass. 

I will say now though that some of the lead glass is very 



soft indeed. Some of it will not stand even 850°F. and should 
be fired at about 700°F. The main trouble for decorators 
will be to know which is the softest glass, and it is impossible 
to detect this from appearances, as all look alike. Only by 
experimenting and by purchasing from the same factory can 
you have the best results. There is a little gambling of course 
in firing, but I find that by keeping the firing rather below than 
too high, and by distributing the pieces in the kiln according 
to thickness and strength, I seldom lose any piece of glass. 

Since the beginning of the war manufacturers have started 
to produce a glass made of potash taken from coal and cinders. 
The quality of American glass is gradually improving and we 
will no doubt have before long glass comparing favorably with 
the Bohemian or Italian product. 

I have mentioned before that the most effective decora- 
tion is that with lustres. It is also the most easily carried out. 
I advise you to begin with lime glass, for instance, small bowls, 
mayonnaise glasses, butter tubs, celery dishes, creamers and 
sugars, bonbons, etc., leaving the drinking glasses for a later 
time when you have acquired more experience in firing. 

Before I begin to apply my lustres, I light a drying box, 
or a stove, or even the kiln, so as to have a good warm place 
to dry the lustres. I take the glass, clean it of dust, rub it 
well with alcohol, inside and outside and dry it perfectly by 
rubbing with a dry cloth. I put the glass over the banding 
wheel, standing on a plate or a piece of iron, or any article 
that will allow me to put the glass in the dryer without touch- 
ing the decoration. It is better to use the banding wheel and 
apply the lustre with a large brush, because with a small brush 
it is very easy to overlook covering small parts of the glass, 
and this mistake cannot be very well corrected after firing. 

Spin the wheel lightly, holding the brush on the glass, be- 
ginning at the top and coming down gradually, covering the 
whole glass. Your lustres will now look uneven but do not 
try to correct this, they will flatten when you put them in the 
dryer and will of themselves become nice and even. 

If you have to paint a glass inside and outside, you should 
paint the inside first and stretch the lustre so that no quantity 
of the- liquid will run down and settle on the bottom. Too 
much on the bottom might cause blistering or peeling off. And 
of course when painting inside of the glass you should start 
from the outer edge of the top and go all around toward the 
bottom. When you have finished the inside, begin to apply 
the lustre on the outside, starting again from the upper edge 
and coming down, covering lightly every spot. I do this 
lustre application against the light and, if possible, in front of 
a white sheet of paper, as in this way I can better detect any 
small space left uncovered and I am more certain of finishing 
the work thoroughly. 

(To be continued) 




PLATE— MARY L. BRIGHAM 



Center of Plate 



Paint petals of flowers Silver. Leaves and stems Apple Green, with flower centers and square at base of stems 
a darker shade of green. Motif suitable also for glass. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



133 





RUSSIAN MOTIF (Suggested by a Russian Ballet Costume) 

Esther A. Coster 

FIRST Fire — Tint entire surface with a dull yellow, using 
9 parts Lemon Yellow and 1 part a rather Light Violet. 
Second Fire — Do not have enclosing circle complete, but 
allow the ground color to serve as the lightest value. Outline 
design in strong black lines. Black edges and handles. Add 
color for second fire, or wait till outlines are fired. Light value, 
Yellow Green. Medium value, dull orange, using Yellow 
Brown. Dark value, Dark Blue. Darkest value, Black. 
Suitable for informal table china or decorative pieces. 



PLATE BORDER AND HONEY JAR 

Elise W. Tally 

TO be carried out on Belleek or Satsuma in enamels. Out- 
line with Black. Leaves and dark space under flowers 
are 2 Chinese Blue, § Grass Green, 1 White. Outside circle 
of large flower form is Cafe au Lait. The light spaces in center 
are Jasmine. Small centers are Orange Red. Three small 
circles under large flower and the large one above upper leaves 
are Naples Yellow. The remaining circles are Orange No. 3. 
Dark space, large leaves and between the stems are Grass 
Green. Bands are Green Gold. If carried out on Belleek 

leave gold for second fire in 
order to give a hot fire for 
enamels. The grey tint is 3 
parts Dark Grey and 1 Yel- 
low Brown painted on. 




iSSSSHi 




134 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




TEA SET, BUTTERFLY DESIGN 

Annie Souther ne Tardy 

JAPAN china of deep mulberry color. Soft enamels must 
be used and a light fire be given. For light part of but- 
terfly and seeds of flowers, use Dull Yellow Enamel. Body of 
butterfly Lakey Red Enamel. For outside of wings, knobs, 
bands and upper part of handles, use Brilliant Black Enamel. 
For stems, outer part of flowers and center of leaves, use 
Bright Sea Green Enamel. For flowers and dots on wings, 
use Rhodian Red Enamel. For leaves, use Green No. 1 Enamel. 
Outline entire design and feelers of butterfly, in Outlining Black. 
This same color scheme can be used on BelleekorSatsumaware. 
With this set was used linens of cream white, with bands of 
Mulberry linen, applied with French knots of Black, and decor- 
ated with Mulberry, Yellow and Green butterflies, appliqued 
in colonial patchwork style of needlework, with napkins to 
match. 






CONVENTIONAL BORDER FOR FLOWER VASE 

Lola Alberta St. John 
CIRST Fire — Outline in Black, oil the dark oblong space in 
* center of triangular form and dust in Royal Blue. Go 
over the lightest tone in triangular form with a thin wash of 
Blood Red, oil the dark grey tone in design and dust with 3 
parts Olive Green and 1 Pearl Grey. All the background of 
design is Gold and centers of butterflies, wings, and squares 
in band at top of design are Opal lustre. 

Second Fire — Tint the ground part of vase, body and 
border of butterfly, wings and medium grey tone in triangular 
form with a light shade of Olive Green or dust with a Light 
Green for Dusting. 




MAY E. REYNOLDS JUDSON - - 

116 Auditorium Building, Chicago, 111. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 

Page Editor 



135 



BIRD VASE 

FIRST fire— Bird in foreground painted with Grass Green, 
Olive Green, and a little Yellow Green for the head, 
and on the tips of the wings near the breast, Banding Blue, 
and a touch of Royal Blue, with Violet for the center of wings, 
feathers near the tail are in Finishing Brown. Best Black 
and Violet. Tail feathers are Brown Green, Dark Green 
and Finishing Brown. Breast in Lemon Yellow, Albert Yel- 
low and Yellow Green. Beak in Neutral Yellow, and a little 
Violet of Iron, and Finishing Brown for the dark touches. 
Bird in background Grass Green and Brown Green for head, 
and crest, Copenhagen Blue, Best Black, Drab, and Violet 
of Iron and Violet for wings. Tail, Best Black, Grey for 
White Roses, and Violet, with a little Violet of Iron. Breast 
in Albert and Egg Yellow, Neutral Yellow with a very light 
wash of Violet of Iron. Beak Finishing Brown and Best 
Black. Leaves in background Olive Green and Violet and 
Grass Green and Violet for the brighter leaves in the fore- 
ground. Branches of the trees a light wash of Violet. Flat 
tone back of branches and leaves Drab and Neutral Yellow. 
Band at top is Copenhagen Blue and Violet. 

Seco nd Fire — Retouch with same tones used in first fire. 

Third Fire — Run over the background with very light 
wash of Violet. 



««* ** 





BIRD VASE— MAY E. REYNOLDS JUDSON 



ROSE VASE— KATHRYN E. CHERRY 



136 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




BON BON BOX— MRS. F. H. HANNEMAN 



DARKEST band and spaces Gold. Lighter bands soft 
Pink Enamel. Conventional flower forms, petals, Pink 
Enamel, stem and leaves Green. Small diamond shaped figure 
above Green and small band above that Pink. Flowers in 



the center, largest one two shades Pink Enamel, next one 
Violet shades of Enamel. Smaller flowers Yellow, Pink and 
Violet Enamels. Small berries Violet with a red center. 
Leaves Yellow Green Enamel. 



-*-,: 





















-cfc'v 







CONVENTIONALIZED SUGGESTIONS OF BITTER SWEET-MARGARET H. WATKEYS 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 
KERAMIC STUDIO Syracuse, n. v. 



DECEM BER 1917 




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The entire contents of this Magazine are covered by the general copyright and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 

CONTENTS OF JANUARY, 1918 



Editorial 

Glass Decorations (Continued) 

First Prize, Glass Competition 

Second Prize, Glass Competition 

For Adaptable Design 

Design with Bryonia Motif 

Atlan Prize, 1917, Chicago Art Institute, Satsama Bowl 

Belleek Vase 

Textile Designing 

Vase 

Scene Vase 

Cold Cream Box 

Beginners Corner 

Salt Shaker and Cup and Saucer 

Border for Plate or Saucer 

Suggestions for the Beginner 

Ramekin and Plate 

Four Panels 

Plate or Cup and Saucer Designs 

Egyptian Bowl, Incense Jar and Cigarette Box 

Egyptian Vase (Color Study) 

Belleek Bowl 

Satsuma Jardinierre 



D. M. Campana 

Mrs. Leah Rodman Tubby 

Lola St. John 

Mrs. Vernie Lockwood Williams 

Mrs. Henrietta Barclay Paist 

Mrs. Richard Lavell 

Mrs. F. H. Hanneman 

Albert W. Heckman 

Kathryn E. Cherry 

M. E. Reynolds Judson 

Arthur L. Beverly 

Jessie M. Bard 

Flora M. Herrington 

Orilla E. Miner 

Ida Nowells Cochran 

Marguerite Cameron 

A. L. Beverly 

Florence McCray 

Albert W. Heckman 

Albert W. Heckman 

F. N. Waterfield 

Elise Tally Hall 



Page 
137 
137 
138 
138 
139 
140 
141 
141 

142-144 
145 
146 
146 
147 
147 
147 
147 
148 
149 
150 

150, 151 
151 
151 
152 



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EGYPTIAN VASE— ALBERT W. HECKMAN 



COPYRIGHT 1917 

KERAM1C STUDIO PUB. CO. 

SYRACUSE. I 



Vol. XIX, No. 9. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



January 1918 




E are beginning with this issue a series 
of articles on design by Mr. Albert 
Heckman which should be of great 
value to those decorators who wish 
to really know something of design 
and its possible application to other 
mediums than china. Though this 
first lesson is on designing for printed 
textiles, the motifs may easily be 
adapted not only to the china itself 
but to table linen, room and furniture decoration, stencilled 
or block printed hangings and all the accessories that go to 
make up a complete picture in the home. 

We hear from various sources that the shortage of china 
for decoration is not so great as one would have imagined, 
that there is still quite an amount available for decoration, 
especially since ceramists have taken up the decoration of 
crude earthenware in yellow, brown, blue, etc., such as is used 
in our kitchen, as well as the various undecorated Japanese, 
Chinese, Italian, Wedgewood, etc., etc., to be picked up here 
and there. There is still plenty of opportunity to carry out 
one's designs for table ware, both china, glass and pottery. 

At the recent exhibition of the Art Alliance in New York, 
an exhibit of the work of "Master Craftsmen," a number of 
quite important pieces both in size and design were shown, 
executed in copper lustre as well as on yellow pottery, in 
brilliant enamels. 

K K 

From a letter to the Editor: 

"We are a city of clubs, and thousands of our best-women have listened 
to out of town speakers, who in their lectures on "Home decoration" have 
ridiculed what they called hand painted china. This was our first blow. 
Free instruction in china painting in our department stores, followed by a 
flood of horrors for sale in every corner grocery, seemed like a vindication for 
the out of town lecturer.. 

This is not the first time we have heard of the ill advised 
and indiscriminate condemnation of amateur decoration of 
china. Ill advised, because china, table ware especially, is 
quite as legitimate a field for the exercise of one's taste and 
artistry as is any other medium for "Home decoration;" in- 
discriminate because the critic ignores or is ignorant of the 
extremely artistic work of some of our foremost decorators. 
The fault is not in the decoration but in the decorator. If our 
decorators of china would study design and the principles of 
decoration, there would be less criticism. 

X X 

Several interesting designs were received for our glass 
competition. Many had the defect of being too heavy, too 
much like designs for china. A decoration that is suitable 
for china may not be suitable for glass. The main beauty of 
glass is in the shape and the color. Decorations in gold, 
enamels, etc., should be used sparingly and be confined to the 
simplest designs. 

The awards in the competition were: 

First Prize, $10 to Mrs. Leah Rodman Tubby of Los 
Angeles. 

Second Prize, $5, to Miss Lola St. John, Albany, Ind. 

Mentions to Mrs. D. Elizabeth Roberts of Philadelphia, 



Miss Venita F. Johnson of Escalon, Cal., Miss M. A. Yeich 
of Lorane, Pa. and Miss Laurel G. Foster of Montreal. 

H X 
Sculptors throughout the country are preparing to sub- 
mit designs for the bronze equestrian statue to be built in 
Havana in memory of General Maximo Gomez "The Cuban 
Liberator." Prizes aggregate $17,000, the winner's prize 
being $10,000. Cuban consuls throughout the country have 
been supplied with conditions of the competition wihch will 
close next April. 

» » 

The Editor again offers to exchange Keramic Studio 
publications or Robineau porcelains for stamp collections for 
her son's Christmas. 

GLASS DECORATIONS (Continued) 

D. M. Campana 

I PRESUME you can now pick up the glass without put- 
ting your fingers on the lustre: You have it standing on 
a dish, tile or any other flat article. Remove the dish and the 
painted glass and put them at once in the drying box or over 
the warm stove. If nice and warm, your lustre will be dried 
in about 15 minutes. Now set it aside in a dry place, away 
"from dust, to be fired whenever you are ready. 

If your fired lustres show spots, you have only yourself 
to blame. Spots cannot be easily remedied, especially on 
transparent glass. Lustres contain a good quantity of dis- 
solved rosin, which, being naturally tacky, will retain every 
bit of lint flying in the air, and this rosin being absorbed by 
the lint, an empty spot is left in firing. Spots may also be 
caused by humidity, and both humidity and dust should be 
avoided. I have fired hundreds of pieces without spot marks 
and have come to the conclusion that others can have the same 
results by following the methods I have used. 

I will now suggest a few easily attained effects, so that 
students will have the satisfaction of obtaining at once good 
decorations without spending too much time in experimenting. 

If you can purchase a good piece of glass, such as a jar or 
creamer or mayonnaise dish, bonbon dish, etc., not top thin, 
try to paint this with Amethyst lustre. Use a good size, clean 
shader, the largest you have, the larger the brush the quicker 
and better the result. Apply the lustre on the outside only 
(by applying it both inside and outside the lustre will be darker). 
Cover every little part and place the glass to dry at once. 

Another good effect is obtained by the use of Blue Pearl, 
a light and very decorative blue shade. Try this color on a 
standing piece, vase, jar, etc. 

Iridescent Pearl also gives interesting effects. I found 
that Mother of Pearl or Opal, as used for china, did not have 
enough opalescent effect, enough fire, so to say, but this 
Iridescent Pearl gives perfect results. It is full of color and a 
glass covered with it looks very beautiful. 

Another attractive lustre is Orange for Glass. I found 
though that this special color is better when padded, while I 
never pad other lustres. Orange fired, then covered with 
Iridescent Pearl, gives striking results. 

For drinking glasses, tumblers, goblets, sherbet glasses, 



138 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




GLASS COMPETITION 

FIRST PRIZE— MRS. LEAH RODMAN TUBBY 

Treatment by Mrs. S. D. McLaud 

MAKE band of gold. Outline design in Outlining Black. 
Stems and leaves filled in with Matt Bronze Green, 
flower with Matt Pink, dots with Outlining Black. Inside of 
glass Iridescent Yellow Lustre. 

SECOND PRIZE— MISS LOLA ST. JOHN 

Treatment by Mrs. S. D. McLavd 

BANDS and ovals Gold, outline for leaf, inside of oval and 
small diamond is Outlining Black, other lines Gold. Leaf 
Yellow Green Enamel, diamond and small spaces in oval are 
Blue Green Enamel. Inside and bottom part Mother of Pearl 
Lustre. 

STUDIO NOTE 

Mrs. Carrie L. Gwatkin has returned to her studio at 3905 
Broadway, New York City, where she will again take up the 
teaching of decoration and design. 



FIRST PRIZE— GLASS COMPETITION 



etc., Golden Amber is a very effective lustre, a light and deli- 
cate shade. For this purpose also Blue Pearl and Iridescent 
Pearl are good. For claret glasses, Rose Shell looks very 
good, as it is a suggestive shade and very delicate. Amethyst. 
also for drinking glasses seems to please the public. 

All these effects can be obtained easily. I forgot to men- 
tion that rather than dip the brush in the lustre bottle, I find 
it quicker and more satisfactory to pour a few drops of the 
lustre on a saucer and take the lustre with the brush from this 
saucer. 

As a diversion some table glasses may have a small gold 
rim at the top or even at the foot, or a delicate border, either 
etched or in enamels, but in that case only the simplest and 
plainest borders should be used. 

I have painted tumblers with just a narrow band in Pea- 
cock Blue lustre or in Ruby and the effect was very good. 

Of course there are many other kinds of decorations 
which my further articles will describe, but a good, sound 
advice to students is to limit themselves first to single, all over 
shades of lustres, a decoration which is easily and cheaply 
obtained and sells well. 

As to the application of one lustre over the other, the 
same rules should be followed as for china. One lustre must 
be fired before you apply the second. I have tried and found 
good the following effects: Iridescent Pearl over a previously 
fired application of Amethyst, or Orange, or Pearl Blue, or 
Rose Shell. This Iridescent Pearl will also give a very rich 
tone over Turquoise Blue and Peacock Blue. 

To summarize the lustre lesson, you should remember the 
following important points: Clean your glass thoroughly with 
alcohol and dry it with a lintless cloth. If you have no alcohol 
use soap suds and dry the glass well. Apply lustres quickly 
with a large brush, being careful not to leave any uncovered 
spots. Dry your glass lustre as soon as it has been applied, 
this is very important. Do not apply gold or enamels over 
unfired lustre. 

The firing lesson will be given in next number. 
(To be continued) 




SECOND PRIZE— GLASS COMPETITION 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



139 




MRS. VERN1E LOCKWOOD WILLIAMS - Page Editor 

University of Pittsburg. Home Studio, 52 W. Maiden St., Washington, Pa. 



for dusting the color, 
first using Cherry 
special medium for 
dusting; applying it 
very evenly and not 
too heavy. Clean 
out design and fire. 
Second Fire — Apply 
medium and dust 
leaves and stem 
forms. Then add 
flower forms, clean 
and paint in light and dark centers. 

If a third fire is necessary repeat same treatment being 
careful not to apply too heavily if china is used — Belleek being 
so much softer will take repeated firings very safely. No em- 
blems are used. 



FOR ADAPTABLE DESIGN 

r I ^HIS design using the ogee as a foundation is a combina- . 
A tion of the problem of last month. It bends itself to 
many shapes and color schemes. The rectangular vase was 
one found in a Japanese curio shop in New York and is of a 
common red clay — in fact looked very much like a glazed brick. 
The bonbon box was of Satsuma and the design was worked 
out in Cherry enamels. The original color scheme was one 
having the background of Grey Green and leaves were of a 
much darker tone. The flower form was Pompadour; white 
space, very light Neutral Yellow; dark spot in flower of Ver- 
million or Yellow Red. This would be an admirable design 






140 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




n«n 



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n»n 



BRYONIA MOTIF— HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST 



MRS. HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST - Page Editor 

2298 Commonwealth Ave.. St. Paul, Minn. 

DESIGN WITH BRYONIA MOTIF 

THE design shown this month is a simplified drawing of 
the Bryonia plant and is arranged with the thought 
of a bowl or jardiniere decoration. Leaves and stems call for 
two values of Grey Green. Berries may be either red or pur- 
plish black and the dots at the base should correspond to the 
color of the berries. If the berries are red the panels should 
be a lighter value of same or they may be grey green like the 
leaves. If the berries be. made purple or black the panels 
would be effective in gold. The extreme upper and lower edge 
may be a dark green. The background may be old ivory, 
if red berries are used. If black or purplish berries and gold 
panels, neutral grey will be an effective background. The 
design may be treated in flat color. Enamels or lustre and 
the little band at base can be echoed inside of the bowl near the. 
top. 

ART NOTES 

The Annual Exhibition of the Twin City Keramic Club 
was held during the week of November 19th in Minneapolis. 
The feature of the exhibit this year was a plate competition 




BRYONIA MOTIF— HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



141 




ATLAN PRIZE, 1917, CHICAGO ART INSTITUTE 
SATSUMA BOWL 
Mrs. Richard Lavell, Minneapolis, Minn. 

with outside jury. This brought out some interesting and 
beautiful plates in varied styles of design. The first prize 
was awarded to Mrs. Nell Grey. Mrs. Lavell, winner of the 
1917 Atlan prize in Chicago, second prize, Miss Frances E. 
Newman receiving honorable mention. 

The exhibit this year showed a fine average. There were 
fewer large exhibition pieces than usual but it was a good show- 
ing of sincere work. The absence of ambitious pieces was not 
due to lack of creative ability or waning interest but to stress 
of circumstances in which expediency held invention in check. 
It takes the eye of faith to pierce the mist of the present and 
discern the better things to come, when imagination will again 
hold sway and artists dream dreams and bring them into 
manifestation. In the meantime rents must be paid and 
many service decorators are supplementing their regular work 
with various things, thereby broadening their scope and 
adding to their income. 

It will not hurt us to have a few lean years. We appre- 
ciate things by contrast. 

Among the attractive things which have been made to 
add to the income of one artist is a charming little Christmas 
eve window candle stick, made entirely of the Holly leaves 
and berries. It was modeled and then cast in iron and painted 
in the natural holly colors and held a red candle It was de- 
signed to be sold from the studios and commission shops, but 
was so attractive to the larger dealers that arrangements were 
made for exclusive sale in each of the Twin Cities. 

Many added hand made Christmas cards to their stock 
and in one studio space was sublet to an artist in embroidery, 
who is showing some truly artistic things in linens, crepes, etc. 

The next social meeting of the club will be in St. Paul 
when a trip to the State Capitol (under the guidance of Mr. 
Lauros M. Phoenix, a mural decorator) will be preceded by 
luncheon. 

One of the most hopeful signs in the local art world is the 
evident desire on the part of the different clubs to fraternize. 
This is being fostered and made possible by the management 
of the Art Institute in establishing the annual local exhibit 
which includes every department of art and in having each 
club represented on the committee of arrangements and on 
the jury of acceptance. 

The exhibit opened this year with a very informal recep- 



tion to the public by the Institute and Clubs represented. 
Russian tea was dispensed from the alcoves in the corrider 
and such a democratic spirit was engendered that the social 
feature will be made a monthly event during the year when 
each club in turn will act as host and hostess. 

Such a program cannot but result in breaking through 
in a measure the formal atmosphere which usually surrounds 
an Art Institute and in creating a more fraternal feeling among 
artists in different lines. 






BELLEEK VASE 

Mrs. F. H. Hanneman 

ALL dark bands and scrolls in Dark Blue Enamel. The 
flower is in light and dark pink enamel, the darker 
parts of the petals being the darker pink, also the bud. The 
leaves are in two shades of green enamel, and the stems and 
scrolls in flower motif in the darker shade of green. 



142 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



TEXTILE DESIGNING 

Albert W. Heckman 

ALL branches of Art are related. It may seem redundant 
to say this, yet there are many of us who do not know 
how intimately they are related. It is especially true of the 
applied arts, which are not only closely interrelated but often 
dependent upon each other. The success we have with one 
is often in proportion to the knowledge we have of the others. 
We know that the same underlying principles of Line, Mass 
and Color which govern the production of a fine design for a 
vase or a bowl are applicable to the making of a design for a 
rug, a wall paper or a textile, and, while we may have confidence 
in our ability to do the one, we hesitate to do the other, which 
we ought to do equally well. No one who ever does a thing- 
well in one branch of the applied arts is without ability in the 
other branches. 

Undoubtedly there are many china decorators who design 
things other than their wares. On the other hand, there are 
many who do not, but who have extra time at their disposal 
and would like to make some practical use of it. For their 
benefit, as well as the student of design in general, I am giving 
a few suggestions about the making of a saleable textile 
design. 

There are many kinds of^textile designs, some of which 
are made to be reproduced by weaving, some by printing and 
some by various other processes. To encompass the whole 
subject in this short paper would be impossible. However, 
there is one phase of the subject that is within our reach. It 
is the designing of textiles to be printed. It is this branch too, 
which is of special interest to-day because of the demand for 
that particular kind of textile design. 

Just at present china is scarce, and the future of the 
china painter is somewhat precarious. This is due in part we 
know to the war. On the other hand the war has caused a 
demand for textile designs. In the past, many of our leading- 
manufacturers have used foreign designs and foreign trained 
designers. Now many of the sources are cut off entirely and 
they are obliged to look to the artists of America for help. It 
is up to us to meet the demand and supply it with designs that 
are worth while, practically and artistically. No one is more 
fitted to undertake the task than is the ceramic artist, for, as 
a rule she has made the study of textiles part of her training, 
and furthert, the trend that china decoration has taken towards 
conventional treatment and pattern design is in itself an ample 
basis for the execution of creditable work in some of the allied 
branches of design. 

The two plates on pages 143 and 144 illustrate in a brief 
manner one way of making a simple textile design. Plate I is 
a miscellaneous collection of motifs derived from nature. The 
other plate shows the variation and adaptation of one of these 
motifs to two designs. In like manner other of the motifs 
cam be varied and adapted. 

Just as there is a difference in designs one might make 
for a punch bowl or a tea set, so there is a difference in designs 
for various sorts of cloth. In making a design one must first 
of all consider for what kind of material it is to be used and then 
plan it accordingly. 

Printed designs are reproduced from copper rollers, the 
sizes of which vary. The design is engraved on the roller, and 
after the design has served its purpose, it is ground off and 
a new one is put on. Rollers used for printing a design on 
silk are sixteen inches in circumference. They are used until 
repeated grinding, in the application of new designs, has re- 
duced the circumference to fifteen inches. They are then 
discarded. Therefore, any design which repeats within a 



space from fifteen to sixteen inches can be used on a roller for 
the printing of silk. In like manner rollers for printing cotton 
material vary from eighteen to sixteen inches in circumference. 
The width of the rollers varies too, but that need not neces- 
sarily be considered. 

In planning a design which must conform to a given area 
of repetition it is often convenient to build skeleton lines of 
squares, triangles or diamonds in which the motif is to fall. 
However, it is not advisable to resort to their use too much in 
textile designing, for the tendency is to a certain stiffness and 
rigidity of feeling, which is anything except that which is to be 
desired in many instances. A few trials with a few failures are 
all that is needed to overcome any inability to make a design 
repeat properly within the given space of fifteen, sixteen of 
eighteen inches. A few things can be borne in mind which 
will help in planning the repeat. For instance, on a sixteen 
inch roller, a four, a five and a third, an eight inch or any other 
some such division can be used. Often two different units 
are made to repeat alternately. In such a case there must be 
an even number of divisions. Otherwise the units will not 
repeat properly. The two designs illustrated are for silk and 
they repeat at every four inches. 

Color is one of the things that must be given the utmost 
consideration in the making of a practical design. It is one of 
the first things that manufacturers consider in buying a design. 
Designs in few colors cost less, of course, to print than those 
which have many, for each added color means additional 
expense in printing. It is best to make eight the maximum 
number of colors to be used at any time. Many very excel- 
lent designs have been made in only two, three or four colors. 
If the design is of unusual merit a manufacturer will go to the 
expense of using more than eight colors, but this is seldom done. 
Any kind of paper which is not too highly finished will do to 
work on and water colors, tempera or distemper colors are used 
by practically every professional designer. It is not necessary 
to make the designs in black and white like the ones illustrated, 
nor is it necessary to show more than one repeat of the motif. 
But it is advisable to always show one's work to its best advan- 
tage and it is seldom that one repeat will do it, especially if the 
repeat is a small one. Then too, several color schemes of one 
design may be an added inducement to some prospective buyer. 
Take for example the design at the left of page 143 and try it 
in several color schemes. First paint it in one color, an old 
blue, on a grey green ground. Then make another on a yellow 
ochre ground using black for the motif as illustrated. Add 
spots of vermilion red for the berries and dull olive green for 
the leaves. Leave a little edge of background color around 
the berries and leaves. For a third color scheme, say of two 
colors, try an emerald green and a dull light violet on a grey 
white ground. Paint in the whole design with the emerald 
green and add the violet for the berries, leaving a little of the 
background space around them as in the preceeding one. A 
good scrubbing is a great help in uniting any design on a white 
ground to that ground and will often give a finished appearance 
which approaches that of the real textile. Compare the three 
designs and you will see the possibilities there are in one design 
by simply varying the color schemes. Colored paper can be 
used to work on, in which event, it should be the color of the 
material to be printed. It is difficult however to find a paper 
that is the exact color and tone that one wants so it is best to 
prepare a white paper with a wash of color. Needless to say, 
the most artistic things are made in this way. 

The persistent advertiser is the one who gets the business. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



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PLATE I— TEXTILE DESIGNING— ALBERT W. HECKMAN (Treatment page 142) 



144 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



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VASE— KATHRYN E. CHERRY 



ENAMEL treatment for Satsuma or Belleek — Light part 
of flowers and buds is equal parts Warmest Pink and 
white. Light outline around flowers is Grey Violet. Light 
centers in three largest flowers is 1 part Citron and 3 White. 
Small centers in all flowers, buds and circles is Mulberry. All 
the remaining dark tone is 1 part Blue Green and 1 part White. 
For background back of design paint a thin wash of equal parts 
Yellow Brown and Dark Grey. 

Dry Dusting teatment — Light outline around flowers is 
3 parts Pearl Grey, 1 part Dark Grey and a little Cameo. 



Dark centers in all flowers, buds and circles, 2 parts Peach 
Blossom and 1 part Cameo. Light part of flowers Cameo. 
Light centers of flowers is §■ Albert Yellow, 4 Ivory Glaze. All 
remaining dark tone and bands are 2 parts Water Green No. 2, 
1 part Ivory Glaze. 

Second Fire — Paint background back of design with equal 
parts Yellow Brown and Dark Grey and paint a light ivory tone 
over remainder of vase with equal parts Alberts Yellow and 
Dark Grey. 



146 



KERAMIC STUDIO 





SCENE VASE— M. E. REYNOLDS JUDSON 



MAY E. REYNOLDS JUDSON - 

116 Auditorium Building, Chicago, 111. 



Page Editor 



SCENE VASE 

FIRST Fire — Outline with Finishing Brown and fire. Sec- 
ond Fire — Oil with Special Tinting Oil and dust on tint 
with two-thirds Paris Brown, and one-third Yellow Brown, 
paint in scene with Paris Brown, Yellow Brown, Hair Brown 
and Finishing Brown, fire. Third Fire— Retouch scene with 
Yellow Brown, Hair Brown and Finishing Brown. 




COLD CREAM BOX 

Arthur L. Beverly 

BACKGROUND spaces rich blue enamel. Black value to 
be black or china white borders are to be the deep cream 
of Belleek ware. Little panels to be filled with brilliant 
flowers in Orange, Yellow Green and Coral enamel. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



147 





/• •' ■ 



SALT SHAKER AND CUP AND SAUCER— FLORA M. HERRINGTON 



BEGINNERS' CORNER 

JESSIE M. BARD ------ Page Editor 

Dickinson Seminary, Williamsport, Pa. 

SALT SHAKER AND CUP AND SAUCER 

PAINT flower design and wide bands on cup and saucer 
with Green Gold. Fine line around panels is Black. 
Go over the dotted space and top of salt shaker with a heavy 
wash of Mother of Pearl or Opal Lustre. 

Second Fire — Burnish the Gold and go over it with a 
second coat and put the dots on the shaker with Gold. 

BORDER FOR PLATE OR SAUCER 

DRAW the bands on the plate and then trace in the design. 
Plate should be divided in 3 or 5 sections according to 
size of plate. Outline the small flowers, leaves and center of 
large conventional flower with Black. Paint the bands and 
large flowers with Gold, the small flowers are painted with 
Deep Blue Green and a little Turquoise or Sea Green, Leaves 
are Apple Green and a little Yellow Green. Center of all 
flowers are Yellow Brown and a touch of Yellow Red. 

Second Fire — Put another wash of Gold over the first one. 




BORDER FOR PLATE OR SAL CER— GRILL A E. MIRER 



SUGGESTIONS FOR THE BEGINNER 

Ida Nowells Cochran 

BEFORE taking up china decoration care should be exer- 
cised in choosing a teacher. Perhaps you do not know 
good work when you see it. Call on several teachers and com- 
pare work as well as prices. Take some one with you who 
knows. If more of this were done there would be fewer sins 
committed in the name of "decorated" (?) china. After you 
have chosen your teacher follow her advice. If she advises 
against certain pieces or certain decoration follow it. A tactful 
teacher can guide her pupils in the right paths without an- 
tagonizing them, even though it is not the style of decoration 
they had originally planned to do. Follow her advice in 
regard to choosing materials. Buy only standard makes — 
something which has been proven. Cheap materials make 
cheap looking work. I do not confine myself to one make, 
however, as I like some colors of one kind better than others. 
Do not begin this work with the idea that you will be able to 
master it in a few months; or, that you do not have to prac- 
tice at home. A music pupil would advance little if she only 
touched the piano at her lesson hour. If you only want a few 
pieces of china and do not care whether you or the teacher 
does the work do not begin at all but hire your work done 
and your result will be better china for you, a relief to 
teacher and will eliminate the possibility of your claim to 
having done something which in reality is the teacher's work. 
Always be on time for your lesson and if unable to attend notify 
your teacher as early as possible. Do not let a trivial thing 
keep you away from your appointment — the teacher invariably 
keeps hers. 

The following are some rules which I observe in my studio 
and which may be of help to others. Each pupil lays her 
palette directly in front of her on the table with its cover 
underneath. To the right is a folded rag which has been cut — 
not torn — as torn rags make lint. I keep a pair of scissors 
on the table. Just above rag to right is mediums; above this 
is turpentine. My pupils keep medium and turpentine in 
covered cold cream jars. Next the rag the pupil lays out her 
brushes, ' palette knife, china pencil and pen as it saves the 
teacher the necessity of fumbling in the palette or a box for 
them. Above the palette paints, bottles, etc., can be arranged. 
All boxes or baskets for carrying materials may be put on the 
floor at pupils' feet or left elsewhere in the room. This leaves 
the -left side free for any other materials needed. Colors on 
palette are arranged in three rows from left to right — top row 



148 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



yellow to dark brown; second row, green to blue; third row, 
pink to 'purple, leaving the lower half of palette free for painting. 
Pupils should always have clean paints. Take on the palette 
knife that part of old paint which is free from dust and grit; 
remix in center of palette, which is perfectly clean, and put 
in opposite lower corner, which is also perfectly clean. When 
all paints have been transferred in order and palette cleaned 
turn palette upside down and you will have the original order. 
Wash brushes in turpentine and be sure they are soft before 
the teacher comes to you. Always see that you have clean 
turpentine and oil and that there is enough of each. I use 
my old turpentine for cleaning palette and brushes and then 
throw away, getting clean for painting. In the center of my 
painting table I keep a tin box which contains scissors, pen 
knife, adhesive tape, keramic gauge, compass, agate point, 
ruler, etc. I keep a plate divider where the class can use it 
and two large bottles of alcohol and turpentine are also kept 
on the table. I use alcohol for all cleaning purposes as it cuts 
the dry paint better than turpentine and does not run so badly. 
When everything is in order it saves time, there is less con- 
fusion and materials are not so easily lost. I insist upon the 
pupil marking every one of her possessions with her name. 
All brushes, paint bottles, pencils and especially gold boxes 
look alike. I mark both top and bottom of gold box and make 
a hole in a corner of its cover to keep the liquid gold bottle 
standing upright as the cork absorbs it when lying down. 

A simple method for banding plates is by using an ordi- 
nary school compass. Place firmly a small piece of adhesive 
tape (about one-half inch square) in as nearly the center of 
the plate as you can judge. Measure from side to side with 
the compass and, when you have found the center, mark the 
little hole with an "x". Mix your paint for lining as you would 
for painting, then dilute with any good diluting fluid. Sugar 
and water is alright but I recommend Campana's Diluting 
Medium. Add two or three drops as when too thin it runs 
and makes a grey line. You will soon be able to judge for 
yourself. Dip the paint up with the pen and begin your circle. 
You will not be able to make a perfect line the first time you 
try. You will have to persevere but I do know positively 
that you can learn to make a beautiful line with this twenty- 
five cent compass if you only have patience. When your 
pen stops marking fill it again and when you start put it down 
on the china with a little swing so that it does not make a jog 
in the line. Do not grip your compass so hard that you spring 
it. Do not press so hard on your tape that you push it and 
lose the center. If the hole in the tape becomes too large put 
another piece on top. You can make a pen line with any 
color or gold in this way and the price is not prohibitive of this 
ordinary school compass which you probably used in your 
geometry. I keep my diluted paint in a clean empty gold 
box because it runs into the other paints when on the regular 
.palette. A small compass which is a part of a mechanical 
drawing set can be purchased for about $1.25 for banding 
cups, bowls, etc. Almost any store will break a set for you. 
These things are so much cheaper than an ordinary banding 
wheel and I can guarantee them to be just as satisfactory. 

The following are some hints for those who fire and for 
those who have their firing done. Have clean hands when 
you stack the kiln. Look at the make of every piece you put 
in. If you are doubtful of a piece as to quality or the way 
paint is applied you will do the painter a favor by not putting 
it in until you have explained to her the mistake. Be as care- 
ful as you can — learn all you can about the respective heat 
for different colors and when the kiln door is closed you can do 
no more except to fire to the proper heat. But be willing to 
admit when you are at fault. Nine times out of ten the fault 



lies in the painting and not in the firing. The kiln cannot 
rectify your mistakes and, as the old photographer said, can- 
not make a "peach out of a potato." Alas, how many more 
potatoes we encounter than peaches! If you know nothing of 
firing do not criticise the person who fired. Make inquiries 
and perhaps you will learn something you did not know. One 
very common fault of beginners is putting gold on too thin 
and blaming the kiln for firing it off. I uise liquid gold for 
first fire except to rim. Always rim with Roman and liquid 
combined. For the second fire I mix a very few drops of liquid 
gold with Roman gold. This makes a beautiful satiny gold 
and does not have the greenish cast gold put on with turpen- 
tine does. Its wearing qualities are splendid. Too much 
liquid will make the gold look brassy. Brush strokes do not 
show when put on in this manner but the gold should look like 
melted chocolate before it is fired. When fired it looks like 
clay. Do not handle before burnishing as oily fingers may 
leave a mark which does not come off. Clean the under side 
of your china carefully, especially when gold has been used. 
If any purplish spots show after firing they can be removed 
with Sapolio or Bon Ami which is not harmful like the acid. 
But the best way is to be so neat that there are no purple spots. 
Dry china thoroughly before wrapping up. Time and patience 
are always rewarded by a neat appearing piece. Nothing 
worth while was ever attained without conscientious endeavor 
and you should know before beginning that no well decorated 
piece of china was ever executed without hard serious work. 





RAMEKIN AND PLATE 

Marguerite Cameron 

FIRST fire — Paint outline Black. Second fire — Background 
of panel tinted with Yellow Brown, very light; bands, 
leaves and center of flowers Green enamel; lower large flower 
Blue enamel; upper large flower Pink enamel and Deep Pink 
enamel; small flowers Pale Violet Enamel. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



149 







FOUR PANELS— ARTHUR L. BEVERLY 



These panels were suggested by the trailing arbutus and cherry. They are very abstract in treatment and work up best in 

abstract color schemes. They are charming worked up in monochrome as tiles for Ferneries.. Parts of the design 

may be used for borders and the entire panel may be used as a unit or all over for china or textile. 



150 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




PLATE OR CUP AND SAUCER DESIGN— FLORENCE McCRAY 

NO. 1. — Lines and spaces back of flower in square and cir- enamel. Center form orange enamel, 
cle, gold. Leaves, green gold. Flowers, two shades of No. 3 — Bands, leaves and buds green gold. Flowers two 

lavendar blue enamel. shades of lavender blue enamel. Tip of buds the lighter blue 

No. 2 — Lines and scrolls Roman gold. Leaves green enamel. 




EGYPTIAN BOWL— ALBERT W. HECKMAN 
The bowl is to be done in bright blue enamel on Sedji ware. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



151 




INCENSE JAR— ALBERT V. HECKMAN 

EGYPTIAN VASE (Color Study) 

Albert W. Heckman 

THE vase is to be done in Green Gold and Green lustre. 
First paint in the design with the green gold. Then 
burnish the gold and after washing off all the glass paint on 
the gold again in the third fire and be careful in burnishing^it 
so as not to rub the lustre off. 

INCENSE JAR, CIGARETTE JAR AND BOWL 
The incense jar and cigarette box are done in the same 
manner except that Dark Blue lustre is used for the incense 
jar and Yellow Brown is to be used for the cigarette box. 




CIGARETTE JAR— ALBERT W. HECKMAN 



"■^t-x-a-t-g^t. 




BELLEEK BOWL— F. N. WATERFIELD 

The light tone is Oriental Turquoise and the darkest is Dark Blue enamel. 



152 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




SATSUMA JARDINIERE— ELISE TALLY HALL 



TO be carried out in enamels. Light outer circles of large 
flowers is Grey Violet. The dark tone in flowers and 
light part of small circles are 1 part Citron Yellow and 3 parts 
Special White. Centers of large flowers and in small circles 



are Grass Green. Leaves are Celtic Green. All light bands 
are Cadet Blue. The dark background back of leaves in the 
next large circular design is Siver Grey, and the inner dark band 
to it and also at top and bottom of jardiniere are Blue Green. 




TO 



Take full advantage 

of these 
cut prices given to 

YOU 

as a supporter of 

Keramic Studio 

to send 

CHRISTMAS GIFTS 

to your friends. 




Book of 
Cups a Saucers 




A REMARKABLE BOOK OFFER! 

Soon to be withdrawn ! 
50 per cent Discount on the Following: 

W0T TO SUBSCRIBERS ONLY ! 



iC 



Cf 



cc 



Cf 



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Regular Price. 

Class Room No. 1 . Art of Teaching, etc., $3.00 

No. 2. Flower Painting, etc., 3.00 

No. 3. Figure Painting, etc., 3.00 

No. 4. Conventional Decoration, etc. 3.00 
Little Things to Make, 2S5&^ SSf&SSi 2.00 

Book of Cups and Saucers, 1 .SO 

SPECIAL NOTICE — We cannot deliver these books post paid at cut prices, therefore add 15 cents for each book ordered 

THIS IS AN OPPORTUNITY 
OPEN TO ALL SUBSCRIBERS OF KERAMIC STUDIO. 

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The entire contents of this Magazine are covered by the general copyright and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 



CONTENTS OF FEBRUARY, 1918 



Editorial 

Wood Block Printing for Pattern 

Textile Designs 

Design Units 

Museum Study for Ceramic Students 

Plate 

Seven Borders 

The Linen Page 

Bird Design Unit 

Medallions for Creamer and Sugar or Small Vases 

Little Things to Decorate 

Beginners' Corner 

Dinner Set 

How I do my Glass Firing 

Designs for Glass Decoration 

Chocolate Set 

Lemon Lily Vase 

Answers to Correspondents 

Plant Analysis 



Albert W. Heckman 

Albert W". Heckman 

J. K. Heismann 

Maud M. Mason 

Adeline More 

A. L. Beverly 

Jetta Ehlers 

Essie Foley 

Kathryn E. Cherry 

Albert W. Heckman 

Jessie M. Bard 

Mrs. F. H. Hanneman 

D. M. Campana 

M. A. Yeich 

May E. Reynolds Judson 

Albert W. Heckman 

Florence Wyman "Whitson 



Page 
153 
154 
155 
156 
157 
158 
159 
160 
160 
161 
162 
163 
163 
164 
165 
166 
167 
168 
168 



LUNN'S PRACTICAL POTTERY 

for 

ART TEACHERS AND STUDENTS 

2 volumes with about one hundred illustrations 
$4.00 postpaid. 



These volumes sold separately for $2.15 each postpaid. 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO. 
SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



Rare Volumes of Keramic Studio Magazine ! 

Volume 9 Loose numbers complete 
2 sets only $3.50 each 

Volume 12 Loose numbers complete 
2 sets only $3.00 each 

VERY RARE! 

Volumes 1, 3 and 4 Loose numbers complete 

1 set each $4.00 each 

BOUND VOLUMES $5.50 EACH! 
In volumes 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 

Express or postpaid 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO., SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



THESE BOOKS SENT POST-PAID 
ON RECEIPT OF PRICE 

Mra. Filkin's A. B. C. for Beginners in China Painting 11.00 

How to apply Enamels by Mabel C. Dibble - M 

Book on Methods for painting in Water Color by Gertrude Ertabrook 1.00 

Colon and Coloring in China Painting ~ M 

Lunn's Practical Pottery, 2 Tola, (or rola. aold alngly $2.15 each) 4.00 

ITit Teacher of China Painting by D. M. Campana. -.. .78 

Firing China and Glass by Campana »_ — -.. .87 

Book of Monograms by Campana.. - - ». .43 

Books 2 and 3 "Decorative Designs," by Campana, each .83 

'Water Color Painting," Designs by Campagna, .53 

'The Teacher of Oil Painting," Designs by Campana 53 

Flat Enamel Decoration in China by Mra. L. T. Steward.- 1.25 

Home Furnishing by Alice M. Kellogg (Pub. at 1.50) — .71 

The Human Figure by Vanderpool 2.00 

Marke of American Potters by E. A. Barber 225 

American Glassware, Old and New — 1.00 

Grand Feu Ceramics 5.00 

The Fruit Book 8.00 

The Rose Book 8.00 

The Art of Teaching China Decoration, Class Room No. 1 8.00 

Flower Painting on Porcelain, Class Room No. 2 8.00 

Figure Painting on Porcelain and Firing, Class Room No. 3 8.00 

Conventional Decoration of Pottery and Porcelain, Class Room No. 4.. 8.00 

Book of Cups and Saucers l.*0 

Book of Little Things to Make 3.00 

Keramio Decorations Nellie F. Mcintosh 1.00 

Eberlein A McClure's "Practical Book of Early American Arts and 

Crafts," post paid, net 6-00 

"Handicrafts for the Handicapped" by Herbert J. Hall and Mertice M. 

C. Buck, post paid 1-35 

Pottery for Artists, Craftsmen and Teachers by Geo. J. Cox, 1.36 

DesUcn and the Deooration of Porcelain, by Henrietta Barclay Paiat 

^^ Paper Cover 81.50 Cloth Cover 12.50 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 



When writing to advertisers pleas* mention this magarine 




PLATE DESIGN— MAY B. HOELSCH ER 



FEBRUARY 1918 
KERAMIC STUDIO 



COPYRIGHT 1917 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 

SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



Vol. XIX, No. {O.- 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



February 1918 




E are in receipt of many letters of 
appreciation from the faithful 
friends of Keramic Studio who con- 
tinue to hold up our hands through 
this trying time. They are writing 
all sorts of kind things about the 
helpfulness of Keramic Studio and 
among other things they congratu- 
late us on the valuable series'of articles 
on design by Albert Heckman. We 
felt sure these would prove to be the right thing at the right 
time. A closer touch with the other crafts cannot fail to be of 
value both artistically and practically. In this connection 
we would like to hear from readers of Keramic Studio whether 
they would be interested in a revival of the Four Winds Sum- 
mer School. We have been solicited from time to time by 
many students of ceramics to reopen the school which was 
dropped during the year of the exposition because of the 
difficulty of arranging for teachers and students, etc., at that 
time and one thing and another has prevented us taking it 
up again. But we feel that something must be done to keep 
the fire alive until better days when peace will welcome the 
arts and crafts once more. Our pottery building was 
beautifully remodelled just before war was declared and would 
comfortably take care of double the former amount of pupils 
and various crafts as well. If we hear from enough students 
to warrant it, before the first of March, we will arrange for 
teachers of design, over glaze decoration, pottery, and as many 
other crafts as possible, oil and water color, sketching and 
drawing. We will see that there is as large and as varied an 
assortment of china and other wares for decoration as possible 
and all necessary materials and everything possible for con- 
venience and enjoyment. We hear from various sources that 
there have been shipments of china received from abroad lately 
and that the scarcity of china for decoration has been greatly 
exaggerated. If enough of our students are interested in 
summer study we will go to work immediately on this project 
and print full particulars in an early issue. Let us hear im- 
mediately from all who would be interested in a summer 
course of design as applied practically to the various crafts. 
Tell us what you specially desire to study, what months will 
be most convenient and anything that you feel will add to the 
value of a summer school to you. We are thinking especially 
of work for teachers of art in public schools both along the 
line of design and of its practical application. Possibly the 
editor herself will take charge of a pottery department and if 
we decide to reopen the school we will be able to assure all 
students a pleasant as well as a profitable summer. 

a » 

We call attention to the article in this issue by Miss 
Maud Mason with illustrations of work exhibited at the Art 
Alliance in New York. This shows what artistic effects may 
be secured by the decoration of our humble yellow kitchen 
pottery with lustres. Enamels can be used as well, and many 
quaint and beautiful additions can be made to our lunch and 
breakfast equipment without great expenditure. After once 
breaking away from the idea that china is necessary for table 
decoration, it will be an easy matter to find other cheap but 
interesting wares in our crockery and other stores which will 



lend themselves to the same treatment with quite unusual 
and attractive results. 

H K 

The Editor wishes to repeat her offer to exchange Keramic 
Studio publications or Robineau Porcelains for stamp col- 
lections for her son. Several have written of having small 
collections and ask what stamps are wanted. As there are 
many thousand varieties, it would be impossible to take time 
to make a list, so we would suggest that those having stamps 
should send them by mail to the Editor who will make an offer 
for stamps which can be used, and return the balance. As 
her son is now enlisted in a hospital corps on its way soon to 
France, the Editor wishes to make special efforts to add to his 
collection for his return. 

« » 

It is the time now for all good patriots to do their bit and 
another's as well, and while we are devoting our spare moments 
to Red Cross work we must not forget that it is also necessary 
to keep alive the interest in arts and crafts. For many long 
years after the close of the war, Europe will be wholly engrossed 
in rehabilitation and it will fall to America to bring back to 
the world interest in all that goes to beautify life andjnake 
for happiness. Let us hold fast, and work for the future as 
well as for the present. 

K K 

THE DES MOINES LEAGUE 

An exhibit of Cloisonne and an informal talk on this most 
beautiful art was a feature of the December meeting of the 
Keramic Art League of Des Moines, Iowa. 

Mr. Walter Titze of Minneapolis, Minn., a well known 
decorator of porcelains, who is now stationed at Camp Dodge, 
la., addressed the League on work being done in the Minne- 
apolis Keramic Club. 

The Des Moines League was organized May 24, 1907 and 
was known as The Punsch Art Club, named in honor of Prof. 
H. 0. Punsch of Dresden, Germany. It was the culmination 
of a two months study with Prof. Punsch, who, at that time 
made Richmond, Indiana, his home. A year after its organiza- 
tion the club's name was changed to the present one. 

Excellent work has been done by the League during the 
ten years of its existence and a number of exhibits held. 

Program for the year is as follows: 

Dec. "Cloisonne", Mrs. C. N. Kinney, Mrs. Mary Spates, 
Mrs. H. Christy and Miss Ella Kech. 

Jan., "Naturalistic as Related to Conventional Decora- 
tion," Mrs. E. L. Morgan, Mrs. E. W. Miller, Mrs. J. H. Ramsey, 
sey, Mrs. W. Seeburger. 

Feb., "Conventional Decoration," Miss Blanchard, Miss 
Godfrey, Miss Brereton, Mrs. 0. G. Winters. 

March, "Oriental Decoration," Mrs. R. U. Wilkinson, 
Mrs. Arthur Bennett, Mrs. Paul Marsden, Miss Ritchey. 

April, "Porcelain Tiles of Many Countries," Mrs. Leula 
Hart, Mrs. E. Higley, Mrs. B. F. Carroll, Miss Gertrude Evans. 

May, "Lustres of The Past and Present," Mrs. Alice 
Seymour, Mrs. S. Arnold, Mrs. L. Bowers, Mrs.. J E. McDaniel. 

June, "Election of officers and picnic." 

Present officers — Mrs. Loula Hart, President; Mrs. C. N. 
Kinney, Vice-president; Mrs. Arthur Bennett, Treasurer; 
Mrs. R. U. Wilkinson, Secretary. 



154 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



WOOD BLOCK PRINTING FOR PATTERN 

Albert W. Heckman 

"Jl/TUCH has been written about wood block printing, yet 
-L* -*- much has been left unsaid, for the subject is an almost 
inexhaustible one, and one which is never without interest 
to an art student. As teachers of art find this to be so, the 
subject is being introduced more and more each year in the 
Art Schools and High Schools throughout the country. Once 
one has done some block printing he realizes its value as a 
medium of expression and as a means of special educational 
value. The quick results one gets, after a few trials at cut- 
ting a block and printing with it, are simply astonishing to a 
beginner. This is probably due to the limitations one must 
conform to in making a design simple, so that it may be cut 
in wood, and also to the fact that once a block is cut ah" sorts 
of color experiments and pattern arrangements can be made 
with very little effort. 

Printing for pattern is especially interesting. You never 
know just what you will get and the uncertainty makes the 
work all the more fascinating. You can, of course, cut a small 
design which is complete in itself, in which, event you know 
what to expect in printing. But when you have a small 
block on which there are perhaps a few abstract lines or some 
detail of a flower, leaf or bud, and it is repeated in various 
ways, the results are surprising to say the least. Take for 
instance the designs Nos. 2, 3, 4 and 5 on page 155. They 
were all made from one block on which one of the motifs given 
in last month's Keramic Studio was cut. The other designs 
were also made from others of the motifs. 

The materials needed for wood block printing are few and 
inexpensive. All that are absolutely needed are a piece of 
felt about six inches square, a piece of glass on which to lay it, 
some oil paints and turpentine, some water colors and a little 
mucilage, a sloyd knife for cutting the design, two or three 
small gauges for digging out the background spaces, a wooden 
clamp and a brace for holding the block firmly to the table or 
bench on which one is to work. A pen-knife may be used in- 
stead of the other but it is more difficult to use. 

Any kind of wood which has a close grain will do for the 
blocks. Cherry wood is used by the Japanese and Turkish 
box-wood is used by many of our expert wood engravers. 
For our purposes pine, maple or gum-wood answer very nicely. 
The size of the block depends, of course, on the size of the 
motif to be cut. It is best not to have this too large for the 
wood is apt to warp and then the block ceases to be of any 
practical value. However, it is safe to use any size up to three 
or three and a half inches in diameter and an inch or more in 
thickness. The wood is cut on the side with the grain and 
not on the end grain as for wood engraving. Linoleum may 
be used in place of wood, in which case it is glued to a block. 
It is very easy to cut but it does not stand much wear and there 
is something about its surface that does not hold paint as evenly 
as wood. Therefore, to get best results one should use wood. 

In order to get an even, clear impression from a block one 
should have a flat responsive surface to work on. Several 
thicknesses of blotting paper will do, or better still, a pad 
can be made on a drawing board similar to an ordinary ironing 
board. For printing large pieces a pad is indispensable. 

After the motif which is to be printed is made, it is simply 
drawn or transferred to the block, or the paper on which it 
was drawn may be pasted on. The background is then cut 
away to about an eighth or a quarter of an inch in depth. 
Sometimes it is necessary to give the block a thin coat of shel- 
lac to insure a good printing surface bat ordinarily the paint 



used in printing soon fills up any porous places there may be in 
the wood.- 

The process of printing is very simple. The paint is 
applied to the raised part of the design with a large flat bristle 
brush or from a pad. The latter is much the quicker way and 
it is wholly satisfactory. One should be careful not to charge 
the block too heavily with color for an impression which des- 
troys all color and texture of the thing printed is undesirable. 
After a few trials you can tell just how much paint and tur- 
pentine to use. 

The patterns illustrated this month are all very simple 
ones, such as any beginner ought to be able to make. They 
are enough however, to give one an idea of the infinite variations 
possible with a few motifs. At a first glance Nos. 2, 3, 4 and 5 
appear to have been made from separate blocks but a closer 
inspection reveals that they were all made from the same one 
which was repeated in different ways. 

From your sketch book or your book of tracings select a 
motif simple enough to cut, and after you have cut it, try your 
hand at printing. If you do not happen to have a book of 
tracings use some of the motifs given last month. Often two 
or more motifs may be used together to good advantage, just 
as two or more colors may. For instance, in No. 1 an extra 
block, a small square one, was used and in No. 6 two blocks 
of the same motif, one of which is the reverse of the other in 
light and dark arrangement, were also used. If you have a 
motif which repeats with too marked a movement in one way 
this may be overcome by cutting an extra block of the motif 
with the movement going in another direction. By combining 
the two you get an interplay of movement which is more pleas- 
ing than it otherwise would be. This is evident in the two 
textile designs of last month. 

In order to get the best ultimate results one should make 
a number of preliminary trials for different arrangements in 
color and pattern and the best one selected for the final printing. 
For this purpose some varieties of ordinary wrapping paper 
or just plain wall paper are suitable. Use water colors to which 
a little mucilage has been added to give them more body. 
These trials need not be wasted; they can be used for end papers 
in making books. 

Oil colors are the most satisfactory to use in printing on 
cloth. They bear washing if one does not use strong soap or 
water that is unduly hot. Turpentine is the medium used with 
them and enough is added to give a consistency of cream. The 
color may be ''set" after the textile is dry by pressing it on the 
wrong side with a wet cloth and a hot iron. Dyes are used 
too in printing textiles, but they are quite difficult for a beginner 
to use. 

If one makes a few patterns he will not be satisfied until 
he has made more, and by the time he has made twenty or 
thirty on the order of those illustrated he will have become 
familiar enough with the craft to undertake a more difficult 
problem. Designs can then be made to suit some particular 
material, such as a chiffon, a linen, a heavy silk or a scrim to 
be used in making scarfs, covers, table runners or curtains. 

Later on we will again take up this subject, dealing with it 
in a more advanced way and we will apply some of the designs 
already made, as well as new ones, to some specific articles like 
the above mentioned. 

Whether one is a novice, a student or a teacher every bit 
of work done in wood block printing will prove to be helpful. 
Aside from the practical benefits to be derived from it, it affords 
a splendid means of working out, and keeping in touch with, 
the fundamental principles of designing which one must always 
have at his finger tips in order to produce good work. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



155 



H 
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156 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




DESIGN UNITS BY J. K. HEISMANN 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



157 




No. I Large Yellow Pottery Bowl, Copper Lustre 
Decoration, designed and executed by 
Elizabeth Mason Vanderhoof 



No. 2 Bowl, designed by Maud M. Mason. 
Executed by Elizabeth Mason Vanderhoof. 
Italian Ware, Gold Lustre Decoration. 
EXHIBITED AT THE MASTER CRAFTSMENS' EXHIBITION OF THE ART ALLIANCE 



MUSEUM STUDY FOR CERAMIC STUDENTS 

Maud M. Mason 

WHEN pupils come to me to study design I try to im- 
press upon them the importance of studying the fine 
examples of craftsmanship to be found in the various and 
splendid Museums in New York City, which I urge them to 
visit frequently, very keenly appreciating the value of such 
study. I am constantly astonished at the difficulty of inter- 
esting them in such visits. Usually they think a single visit 
will suffice for a stay in the city of several weeks or months. 
They will perhaps have wandered through rather aimlessly, 
being only mildly interested and coming away without a single 
definite impression, excepting that of weariness. Of course 
this is not the spirit in which to do this work. Each visit 
should count and we should gather some bit of information 
that would be of practical use in our work. 

I always suggest that note and sketch book be taken 
along when a trip to the Museum is proposed and that at least 
one careful drawing be made from the detail of some decora- 
tion that impressed you as being especially beautifull. The 
average student is apt to try to copy too much in a given time, 
consequently the sketch is apt to be rather ill considered and 
careless and of little artistic value. My idea of such study is 
to go to the Museum fresh and enthusiastic, select some beau- 
tiful object whose decoration suggests uses to you, say for 
instance an old Greek Jar, with beautifully spaced borders. 
First sketch the jar in outline and space the borders carefully, 
then the general masses of the decoration and then paint with 
brush and ink the design exactly in its relation to the back- 
ground. Endeavor to reproduce the design exactly as it is. 
Just this careful study of the ornament makes it worth while. 
We must not only try to reproduce the pattern but study the 
quality of the line also, or the brush stroke, — the manner in 
which it is executed. 

The collection of Greek Pottery at the Metropolitan 
Museum is full of inspiration to the ceramic decorator and 
many mornings could be spent there most profitably. The 
galleries devoted to the Persian Ceramics are simply fascinat- 
ing, the blues, greens and yellows verily singing against their 
quiet grey background. Such beautiful forms, colors and 



decorations! You are so thrilled by them that you are at first 
quite bewildered, but gradually you begin to study individ- 
ual pieces and then you wish there was no such thing as time 
in the world and that you had all time before you for copying 
them and making them your very own. 

Of course the Chinese Porcelains offer endless suggestions 
to the decorator also and especially are they interesting for 
the study of the disposition of the decorations. Another fine 
collection quite worthy of your study is that of the Mexican 
Majolica. This group is bold and telling in its big splashy 
and simpler designs and fine brilliant coloring which suits the 
coarse ware very satisfactorily. And then the splendid old 
Italian Majolicas constitute another source of joy for us in 
their deligthfully spirited illustrative designs in deep rich blues 
and glowing yellows, oranges and greens. The Italian lustred 
ware is particularly suggestive to us and is a type of decora- 
tion well adapted to some of the soft domestic wares that we 




BOWL— "THE CHASE" 

Polychrome decoration in enamel on Jblack enamel background — Enamel 
green enamel lining the bowl. 
Exhibited at the Master Craftsmens' Exhibition of the Art Alliance. 



158 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



are using so much at present; these pieces illustrate so 
beautifully the charm of lustre when treated with restraint 
and in! the right combinations. Their type of design also 
seems* thoroughly adapted to the medium, always strong in its 
light and dark and direct in its treatment. 

These few suggestions to the student of our beautiful 



ceramic craft, I hope will be taken seriously, as a conscientious 
effort in this direction cannot fail to be a great source of inspi- 
ration and pleasure, and bear a good influence upon our work, 
the idea being not merely to reproduce these fine old decora- 
tions, but to gather from such study an understanding of that 
which is fine and truly decorative in ceramics. 




PLATE— ADELINE MORE* 



OIL all dark bands, stems of berries and dust with Dark 
Blue for Dusting. Oil the widest grey band and dust 
with Glaze for Green and the outer grey band with Glaze for 
Blue. Paint light part of berries with Deep Blue Green and 
the darker side with Banding Blue and a little Violet No. 2 



with touches of Deep Purple for the darkest spots. Leaves 
are -Yellow Green and a little Shading Green. Brown Green 
and a little Albert Yelkw for the lightest ones. Caps of 
berries are Dark Brown and a little Yellow Brown. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



159 



II 




• 1 




n 




Q_ 









SEVEN BORDERS— A. L. BEVERLY 



(Treatment page 160) 



160 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




THE LINEN PAGE. 



JETTA EHLERS 



Editor 



18 East Kinney Street, Newark, N. J. 



RECENTLY^a piece of the wonderful Italian needle-work 
was shown on this page. Believing that the study of 
these fine things is an inspiration for us in our work, another 
sample of the foreign linens is brought to your attention this 
month. This mat is one of a set brought from Russia and is 
highly original in its treatment. While most of the work is 
done with linen thread of the same tone as the linen, a bit of 
yellow is introduced, and the effect is very pleasing. The 
yellow is so pale that it does not obtrude, but, at the same time, 
gives a richness and "snap" to the work. 

The simple lines of it are most charming. The stitch 
used in the wee bands of work is similar to Swedish weaving. 
The edge is rolled and hemmed. This is headed by a row of 
fagot stitch much like the Italian. A table-cloth treated in 
this fashion would be very interesting. Instead of the weaving 
Italian hemstitch could be used, and as this works up quickly 
it need not necessarily be a great task to attempt so large a 
piece. A runner and table mats suggest another way in which 
the same idea might be used. On many Russian pieces bands 
of cross stitch are used in combination with such work as is 
shown in the illustration. 

Last Hallow'een, a ringing of the door bell, accompanied by 
much giggling, told of visiting "goblins." With a few pennies 
in hand, the door was opened to discover two bobbing figures 
much bedecked, and crowned with grotesque masks. One 
tiny tad wore what was instantly recognized as a fine piece of 
Russian needlework. She seemed greatly pleased that it was 
noticed, and upon questioning, said that her mother's mother 
had made it when a young girl in far off Russia, and that it 
had been brought with them when they emigrated to this coun- 
try. It was one of the most beautiful peasant blouses imaginable. 
It was embroidered in most wonderful bands of cross-stitch with 
lines here and there, which upon closer examination were found 
to be almost exactly like the work used on the piece in our illus- 
tration. Bands extending over the shoulders and part way 



down the sleeve were outlined with it, as were the cuffs and the 
side fastening of the blouse. With many admonitions to be 
careful of the beautiful thing, the two youngsters disappeared 
down the corridor, followed by envious and covetous eyes. 

One of the most satisfactory fabrics we have ever had to 
work with is the Russian hand woven linen. This alas! can not 
now be had owing to war conditions. If by any chance you 
come upon some, gather unto yourself all that your purse will 
allow. 

If you happen to have a dark dining room, try the effect 
of bright colored linens on your sideboard, serving table, or 
anywhere you would use covers. 

A set was shown for such a room carried out in orange 
combined with old blue. Bands of the blue were appliqued and 
a crocheted edge of simplest pattern repeated the blue. Aside 
from the things with which it was intended to be used it was 
very garish but in the dark room it was beautiful. Much can 
be done with applique bands in making large pieces for covers 
and the like, as it permits of such a broad style of decoration. 
A little experimenting in this direction is sure to repay one. 
We have been conservative for so long in the use of white 
linens only that it is difficult for many to get away from it. 
But once the step is made the fascination of the colored material 
is bound to "get" you. We need all the brightness about us 
these days of storm and stress that we can have. Even the 
humble sideboard cover might "do its bit." 

SEVEN BORDERS (Page 159) 

Arthur L. Beverly 

NO. 1 — Border for Satsuma bowl. Design is especially 
adapted to this ware as it is suggestive of the Japanese. 
The white in design [is to be the china. Background spaces 
Warm Blue Enamel. Value is wash drawing. Flowers Coral 
enamel. 

No. II — Tint entire bowl in Trenton Ivory. Design in 
Green Gold. Flowers in Coral Enamel. 

No. Ill — Black parts of design to be painted in Black. 
grey value to be a rich green. Flower forms in brilliant 
Orange and leaf forms in Blue. Have these two colors in the 
same value and higher than the other parts of design. The 
white of the china runs in to make the band at the top and the 
buds and stems at the bottom. 

No. IV — Entire surface tinted a deep Old Ivory. Grey 
value in Gold. Black value in Black. White value in white 
of china excepting small centers which are to be in Yellow Green. 

No. V — Black value, soft Brown. White value, Yellow. 
grey value, Yellow Green. 

No. VI — Entire dish tinted in light Yellow Green. Black 
value a brilliant soft Blue Enamel. Grey value to be a warm 
Grey Enamel. Flowers in large panels to be in Yellow and 
Orange. 

No. VII — To be carried out in gold with red flowers and 
bits of green. These borders may be applied to bowls, adapted 
to plates, cups and saucers and small odd pieces. 




BIRD DESIGN UNIT BY ESSIE FOLEY 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



161 









MEDALLIONS FOR CREAMER AND SUGAR OR SMALL VASES— KATHRYN E. CHERRY 



NO. 1 — Oil outside band around medallion, the outline 
around flower and the outer vertical lines below flowers, 
also center of flower and dust with Dark Blue for Dusting. 
The dark grey next to flower and the center vertical space are 
Grey Blue and light part of flower is Glaze for Blue. 

No. 2 — The outline of flower and fine stem lines are Black. 
Dark part of large flower is 2 parts Warmest Pink Enamel 
and 1 part White. The dark centers of all flowers and circles 
are Mulberry. Light center of large flower is Jasmine. Large 
dark circles are Florentine No. 2 enamel, small circle and light 
spots are Cadet Blue. Remaining dark tones are Green Gold. 

No. 3 — Oil leaves and dust with Florentine Green and 
oil all light tones and dust with Dark Blue for Dusting. Re- 
mainder of design is Gold. 

No. 4 — Outline is Black. Light tone in all flowers is 
oiled and dusted with Bright Green. Stems and band is 1 
part Bright Green and 1 part Water Green No. 2. Darkest 



tone is Green Gold. Centers of flowers is Yellow Red painted 
in. 

No. 5 — Oil stems and dust with Water Lily Green. Light 
part of flowers is Yellow for Dusting. Center in flowers and 
small circles is Yellow Red painted in. Outer part of circles 
is Cameo and a little Peach Blossom. Remainder of design 
is Green Gold. 

No. 6 — Large flowers are 1 part Warmest Pink Enamel 
and 1 part Special White, small flowers are Chinese Blue 
Enamel. Centers of all flowers are Mulberry. All dark 
tones are Green Gold. Wide grey bands are 3 parts Dark 
Grey and 1 Yellow Brown painted on. 

No. ,7 — Outline in Black. Lightest tone in flowers is 1 
part Warmest Pink and 2 parts Special White Enamel, darker 
tone is Warmest Fink. Centers and dots are Mulberry. 
Stems are 2 parts Florentine No. 2 and 1 part Grass Green. 
Leaves are Green Gold. 



162 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




KERAMIC STUDIO 



163 



BEGINNERS* CORNER 

JESSIE M. BARD - Editor 

Dickinson Seminary, Williamsport, Pa. 



T 



LITTLE THINGS TO DECORATE (Page 162) 

HESE things can all be done in one firing if the work is 
done neatly enough so there will be no patching needed. 
SQUARE BOX 

In making this a tracing can be made of the whole design 
or just a quarter of it as preferred. After the design is traced 
on the box go over the lines with a thin grey line of India ink, 
correcting the drawing as this is done, then rub lightly over 
the design with a dry cloth to erase all carbon lines. If the 
outlines look heavy rub over them lightly with a piece of 00 
sand paper or fine emery cloth until lines are grey. Next oil 
with Special Oil for dry dusting all of the design except the 
dot in the very center of the lid, the eight buds near the center 
and the heavy stem leading from them, the small square at 
the corners of the box and the bud and stem on the bottom of 
box. All oiling should be done very lightly, as much oil as 
possible should be worked out of the brush before applying 
it to the china. Until one learns to oil lightly it is best to pad 
the oil a little after it is applied. Let it stand about five or 
ten minutes after padding and then dust Water Blue into it. 
Wipe the color off the remainder of the design that has not 
been oiled and then oil it and dust with 1 part Bright Green 
and 1 part Ivory Glaze. With a sharp pointed orange stick 



clean up all edges of the design and then clean all color that 
has adhered to parts of the china that has not been oiled, a 
very small piece of cotton wrapped on the edge of the orange 
stick will be found useful for this. It is then ready for firing. 
If after firing the color does not look even or if parts have 
become scratched it can be patched by mixing some of the color 
with painting medium and painting the color in where it is 
needed. 

AFTER DINNER CUP AND SAUCER 

All of the design and bands are to be oiled and dusted with 
Water Lily Green or if blue is preferred use 1 part Water Blue 
and 1 part Ivory Glaze. 

SUGAR BOWL 

Oil all of design except the small figures over the basket 
and the flower forms and dots in border and dust with Water 
Blue. Oil the seven outside spaces above basket, and the 
two dots at the top of flower form on border and the fine 
line on the lid and dust with Bright Green. Oil remainder of 
design and dust with Coffee Brown. Clean it up well and fire. 
JAM JAR 

Oil the flower form at top and bottom of jar and dust with 
4 parts Cameo and 1 part Peach Blossom. Oil leaf form lead- 
ing into wide band at the bottom and also the wide space 
at the top of jar and on edge of the lid and dust with 1 part 
Dove Grey, 1 Pearl Grey and 1 Ivory Glaze. Clean up well 
as for firing and then paint remainder of design with Green 
Gold. Gold wears better and is richer in tone if applied twice, 
burnish the gold after first fire and go over all of the gold again 
for second fire. 

*• if 

DINNER SET— MRS. F.H HANNEMAN 

BLACK lines and background in panel 
Cherry's Black enamel, also heavy 
bands; geometric bands, Gold; large flow- 
er, Orange enamel, red center; leaves, 
Meadow Green enamel, gold veins; forget 
me-not, Turquoise enamel, yellow center; 
rose, Warmest pink enamel, shaded deep- 
er; berries, Lavender enamel, red centers. 
Tint between two inner gold bands, Grey 
Green dusted. 




DINNER SET— MRS. F. H. HANNEMAN 



164 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




HOW I DO MY GLASS FIRING 

D. M. Campana 

IF you wish to use somebody else's experience, if you wish to 
do as successful people do and have good results, begin 
correctly and have the necessary equipment on hand before 
you start. 

Bear this point in mind. A carpenter needs the proper 
tools, so does an architect, a painter, or a blacksmith, and you 
will also find yourself hampered if you do not have the neces- 
sary articles to carry out your glass firing in a safe way. 

I spoiled many a dozen of fine glasses for that very reason, 
and having now everything in the proper place I spoil none of 
them. Every piece comes out of the kiln perfect in shape and 
as bright as a diamond. Follow my advice and you will be 
surprised to see what beautiful effects can be worked out on 
glass ware. 

In my experimenting or glass killing, I happened to re- 
member that in Venice glasses were fired within an iron-drum 
and following this idea I made myself a protecting Muffl,e (as 
I call it) with removable shelves, and made it in such a way that 
the heat of the Kiln can spread easily around it, giving an even 
temperature to top, bottom and sides, making the glasses per- 
fectly safe. 

I give an illustration on this page of my Muffle and of 
the way I work it with removable shelves, and even with space 
for hanging two or three glasses. It is very helpful and since 
I use it I have never spoiled a glass. I would call this Muffle 
a necessary part of the Glass Decorating equipment. 

I can place it into the kiln when I fire glass and take it out 
when I fire china. Of course, I place my glasses after the muffle 
is in the kiln and made solid and stable on its feet. (See that 
it stands straight on its feet.) 

Previous to this, I had tried to protect the bottom and 
walls of the kiln with iron, asbestos, etc., but found always 
difficulty, and uncertainty. Sometimes the result was good 
and sometimes bad. 

I place my glasses here and there, the thin stem glasses 
right in the centre of the muffle, on the middle shelf, my thicker 
and low glasses on the lower shelves or in any other place. 
I never place hollow glasses, such as goblets, tumblers, etc., 
head down, but stand them on foot. I am careful to have my 
shelves very flat, and if they warp occasionally, I make them 
straight again. This is very important, as crooked flooring 
will make your glasses crooked at the foot. A good piece of 
stacking board, or a perfectly straight piece of sheet iron will 
do well. 

Do not allow one glass to lean against another, and of 
course do not stack glass, do not use stilts, or have any sup- 



port. When your glasses are well placed and touch neither 
glass nor the walls of the muffle, close the door and start the 
fire. I let go full blast at once. 

It is difficult to give any definite time for the firing of glass, 
as much depends on the flow of your fuel, on the weather and 
on the size of your kiln. If you have fired china, you know 
about how long it requires for your kiln to begin getting red. 
When it begins to show a low red glow, be on the look-out. As 
to fire tests, I have tried fire test 0.22, which is the softest 
of all firing cones, and found it a little too hard for general 
use. I have tried zinc pyrometers and found them a little 
too soft, I have tried a piece of common glass as a fire test, and 
could not quite depend on it, but in all this experimenting I 
learned that a very good way to determine the time to stop 
is when I can see right through the glasses in the kiln, in 
other words, when glasses look transparent. 

In looking through the peep-hole when the red glow begins, 
your decorated glasses look black, gradually they lighten up 
and become hazy-dark, and then a little lighter until you can 
see through them. This is the time to stop your fuel and promptly 
open the door of your kiln about one inch or two and leave it 
open. This opening of the door will stop the after heat, will 
keep your glasses firm, and will injure neither kiln nor glass. 

I do my firing in a place that can be made dark at the pro- 
per moment, as in the dark I do not become confused when 
I look into the kiln, and my eyes have in this manner become 
correctly accustomed to the dark red glow inside the kiln. 

All these small points, apparently of little consequence, 
give me the results. I have said that I stop firing when my 
glasses look transparent and I wish to warn you also that it 
is far safer for you, in the few first times you fire glass, to stop 
your firing a few minutes before the glass can be seen right 
through. You will gradually learn by yourself, provided you 
observe closely, to remember the shade of the dark red glow 
required. 

The little opening of the kiln door will not injure your 
kiln nor the glasses. In fact, for curiosity's sake, I have several 
times opened the door wide, while the glasses were red hot, 
and with a flat spoon drawn out glasses without having break- 
ages. However, you should not open the door more than one 
or two inches, this being all that is necessary to stop the after- 
heat. 




KERAMIC STUDIO 



165 



Allow glasses to cool and if you take them out warm, lay 
them over a thick cloth as the contact with a cold body will 
split them at the bottom. 

To make matters more readily remembered, I will resume 
glass firing as follows: 

"Give your standing glass pieces a very flat flooring. 
Crooked flooring will give crooked glasses. 

Draw down your window shades and make the room dark. 
Do this every time you fire glass and you will always fire 
perfectly. 

When the kiln begins to show a little red, watch it. Your 
glasses look now dark, then middle dark, and when you can 
see through them, stop your fuel. Do not forget to open the 
door at once. 

Place delicate stem-ware in the very centre of the muffle 



(middle shelf) and thicker or low shaped pieces elsewhere. 

Gold and enamels require a trifle stronger firing than 
lustres and those pieces may be placed toward the back of 
the muffle or on the low shelf. 

Do not think glass firing is more difficult than china 
firing. It only requires a little more attention and method. 
Fire in the dark is my motto. 

Lest you forget, have the proper equipment. I have ex- 
perimented with almost everything, but found the glass muffle 
a necessity, a great economy in the end. It is a protection 
from the bottom and wall heat. It is clean, easily placed and 
taken out of the kiln. 

My next writing will be on enamels and perhaps on golds, 
all interesting and useful, but do not forget to master firing as 
this is the key to good success in glass decorating. 




DESIGNS FOR GLASS DECORATION— M. A. YEICH 

To be carried out in enamel. Body of the glass in lustre. 



166 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



I 







CHOCOLATE SET— MAY E. REYNOLDS JUDSON 



CIRST Fire — Outline design in outlining ink, fill in outline 
*■ with Green Gold, paint in small roses with Peach Blos- 
som and Rose, forget-me-nots in Baby Blue and Copenhagen 
Blue. Foliage in Moss Green and Copenhagen Grey. Sec- 



ond fire. — Retouch roses with Rose and American Beauty 
and Peach Blossom. Forget-me-nots in Banding Blue, and 
Copenhagen Blue. Foliage, Grey for White Roses and Peach 
Blossom. Retouch gold. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



*67 




LEMON LILY VASE 

Albert W. Heckman 

THIS is to be done with flat tones. They may be all dusted 
on or some of them may be painted in. The background 
however must be dusted. First outline the whole design with 



Glaze for Blue or with Grey Blue. Then paint in the lilies 
and leaves with flat washes of Lemon Yellow and Yellow Green 
or dust them with dusting colors. The background is Grey 
Blue and the stamens are Deep Ivory. The last fire is with 
Glaze for Green. Cover everything except the lilies. 



168 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

G. A . — Am sending a design, asking your opinion if it would be suitable 
for jardiniere as a band around top. 

2. Could you tell me of a rich deep mat brown for the body of it? 

1. Yes, the design would be all right as a border. It would be better 
not to have the dark brown back of design, use a tan or a light brown. 

2. We are not familiar with matt colors, write to a firm selling the matt 
colors and they will be able to give you the information. 

C. T. — I am painting a large punch bowl all in ivory, Roman gold and green 
gold. The inside first tinted a pale ivory I have dotted with small bunches of 
grapes the top being finished with a thin line of gold. I want to use some raised 
paste for gold and am told that the paste cannot be fired more than two times and I 
want to put more than two coats of gold on the leaves. Would it be all right to put 
on leaves, fire and then put on paste? Would the paste stick to green gold? 
Please send me directions for mixing paste. At what heat must it be fired? 

2. I also have a large tray done in gold dragons outlined in black, with 
metal lustre edge, and two shades of dark blue in matt finish. The matt finish 
cracked off and then I took all the rest off with acid. Can you tell me what was 
the matter? 

S. I have a Belleek tea set same as enclosed illustration, and am unable to 
select a design for it. At some time the butterfly design in December Keramic 
appeals to me as no other design ever has. How many colors would be permiss- 
ible? it is to be done in enamels. I wish to put a band and one butterfly on 
each cup. Would it be all right to have two each alike using three colors, coral, blue 
and green? 

1 . If paste is properly mixed it will stand more than two fires. It usually 
needs two applications of gold to produce a good color, so you could put the 
paste on for first fire and also put the first coat of gold on the leaf and then 
put gold on the paste the next two times and also another coat on the leaves. 
Yes, the paste would stick to the green gold. To mix the powder paste rub 
all lumps out of it and add a drop of fat oil of turpentine, there should not be 
enough of it to hold paste together but should just make it look moist, rub 
this through thoroughly on a ground glass slab and with a bone or horn knife 
(not a steel knife) then breathe three long breaths on it, rub it together a little 
and repeat this twice and then add enough garden lavender oil to make it the 




right consistency. The paste must not be rubbed after the lavender is added. 
Be sure that the lavender is a thin quality, it should not be oily. 

2. The oil was probably used too heavy causing it to peel off. 

3. The butterfly design could be used very well. As many colors as 
you desire could be used just so they harmonize. Yes it will be all right to 
have two cups of each color, that is often done. 

M . M. C. — If you can give formula for mixing gold, something that will 
keep open a little longer than turpentine it will be greatly appreciated. 

Use the cheapest quality of Garden Lavender Oil, it is also called Lav- 
ender Compound. It must not be an oily quality. 




PLANT ANALYSIS— FLORENCE WYMAN WHITSON 




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The entire contents of this Magazine are covered by the general copyright and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 

CONTENTS OF MARCH, 1918 



Editorial 

A Tribute to Mabel C. Dibble 

Cup and Saucer 

Jardiniere 

The Making of A Design for Filet Crochet Lace 

Plate with Berries 

Satsuma Vase with All-over Pattern 

Belleek or Satsuma Bowl 

Chocolate Pot, Cap and Saucer (Color Study) 

Suggestions from the Color Study 

Service Plate 

Enamel Decoration for Glass 

Sherbet Glass in Enamels and Lustre 

Fruit Bowl 

Salad Bowl and Plate 

Elderberry Blossom Vase 

Beginner's Corner 

Plate Design 

Answers to Correspondents 

Designs Adapted from the Wild Rose-Hip 

Design for Marmalade Jar and Plate 

Snow Berries 

Plate Border 



Eva E. Adams 
Adeline More 
Kathryn E. Cherry 
Albert W. Heckman 
Clara L* Connor 
Elise Tally Hall 
Elise Tally Hall 
Albert W". Heckman 
Adelaide Alsop Robineau 
May B. Hoelscher 
D. M. Campana 
Lola St. John 
Leah Rodman Tubby 
M. Louise Arnold 
Albert W". Heckman 
Jessie M. Bard 
Kathryn E. Cherry 

M. Janie Launt 
Florence McCray 
Margaret "Watkeys 
Mrs. F. H. Hanneman 



Page 
169 
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170 
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173 
174 
174 
174 
174 
175 
176 
176 
177 
178 
179 
180 
180 
180 
181 
182 
183 
184 



LUNN'S PRACTICAL POTTERY 

for 

ART TEACHERS AND STUDENTS 

2 volumes with about one hundred illustrations 
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Vol- XIX, No. n. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



March 1918 




UR editorial of last month asking 
subscribers who would be interested 
in the reopening of our Summer 
School in the old Robineau Pottery 
to notify us, so that we would know 
what kind of support we could 
depend on, has brought so few 
answers that it is impossible for us 
to make a decision on the subject 
for the present. The teachers also, 
as is natural and right, ask us what guarantee we would give 
them that their trip here would not be profitless and of course 
we cannot give any guarantee unless we are assured in ad- 
vance of a substantial support. Let us hope that the war 
will soon be over and that we can again plan and do things as 
we did when conditions were normal. That there will be an 
art revival after the war there is no doubt. Let us prepare 
for it by keeping the fires alive as much and as well as we 
can during the difficult times of the present, and for our part 
we are ready to open our building of the old pottery to a 
summer school as soon as we see a demand for it. 

K » 

The treatment for last month's supplement, plate by 
May B. Hoelscher, was by mistake left out of tne February 
issue. It will be found in this number. 
» » 

Lack of space prevents us from giving in this issue an 
interesting lot of photographs of the last exhibition of the 
Chicago Society. We reserve them for April number. 

K M 

The term Applied Art has so long borne the good natured 
but rather snobbish attitude of the pictorial art class that 
every once in a while we have to pull ourselves together and 
remember the larger significance of the term. Instead of 
the narrow concept of applying decoration to an object we 
should remember that art applied is art made practical — a part 
of our lives. Art is the result of the power to perceive and 
express the truths of nature. Art expressions may be of an 
emotional, an intellectual or spiritual nature. 

The function of art is to transform the daily routine of 
living from the material— the laborious — to the plane of pure 
enjoyment. It should reveal to us the purpose back of all 
activity. 

The arts which contribute most to this realization must 
be those which may be most closely woven into the lives of a 
people. Applied art in its broader sense then includes all of 
the industrial — the useful arts'. 

Under this classification we have the important branch — 
mural painting or mural decoration. Mural painting, while 
pictorial in essence, is decorative in treatment and subject to 
the laws and limitations of decorative art. It is art applied 
to a specific purpose and limited to a given shape and space. 
It is symbolic in concept— it preaches while it delights and 
charms the senses. It combines the aesthetic (the imaginative) 
and the practical; aristocracy and democracy; it is essentially 
the art of service, it is art applied. 

Reinforced by this big brother the lesser decorative arts 
take on an added dignity and importance. 



Without enumerating all of the useful arts, we can in our 
minds run over the many ways in which art, applied to the 
ordinary things of life, contributes to our pleasure and educa- 
tion and lifts us consciously or sub-consciously above the purely 
physical aspects of labor. If the art of living is the consum- 
mation of the application to our daily lives of the principles 
underlying all art and (what artist can doubt this) surely the 
arts which enter most intimately into this process of evolution 
are the ones by which we expand mentally and spiritually and 
which transform our physical acts into purposeful processes. 

So let us not be unduly alarmed because the demand for 
art craftwork is temporarily suspended. The world cannot 
evolve without the stimulus of the beautiful. The desire to 
beautify is the creative instinct; the appreciation for the beau- 
tiful is the sign of sanity and progress. There is a force at 
work now which is trying to preserve to the world the ideals 
which this generation as a whole has attained. This force 
is the concrete expression of ideals for which art in all its forms 
is responsible. (For is not art in its highest and fullest sense 
synonymous with religion?) When this victory is won and 
sanity and good will restored — evolution will resume its normal 
processes and the demand for the beautiful combined with 
the useful will reappear. The very necessity for the preserva- 
tion of the ideals we had gained,. has resulted in a spiritual 
growth in those actively contending, which we as yet hardly 
comprehend. This spiritual exaltation infused into the next 
generation must result in larger appreciation and a greater 
desire for artistic surroundings. We are only a few degrees 
less shocked at the wanton destruction of the art expressions 
of the past centuries, than at the terrible sacrifice of life. This 
is because these things destroyed are more to us than the 
physical structure. They represent the creative impulse of 
the generation past. They are concrete evidences of spiritual 
forces which impelled those workmen to put- their ideals into 
form. 

To come back to our own craft — it has been said recently 
that keramic art is a thing of the past and has no future. A 
thing of the past it surely is — for it stands as the most complete 
and conclusive evidence we have of past civilization. Through 
it we retrace our steps from the present back to races so re- 
mote that it constitutes the only records extant. 

As an art of the future, so long as the creative impulse 
persists in human nature, we will embellish those most useful 
and intimate objects of daily life, and with the added inspira- 
tion and knowledge gained through close association with the 
other arts of the period, we will some day cease running to and 
fro and settle down to the business of expressing our own 
impulses and ideals in a way which will establish evidence of 
this period for the Museums of the future. 

No other branch of decorative art has ever gained such a 
grip on the people of this generation as keramic art. It may 
not for a long period regain the immense popularity it has enjoyed 
in the past, but it is for us to say whether or not it shall die out 
for want of sincere devotees. 

Human nature is easily swayed and we are still much like 
sheep to follow a leader blindly, but we do not have to do this, 
it is "up to us." There are some, who, having exhausted the 
commercial possibilities of some one phase of an art will aban- 
don it for something more profitable: anyone is free to do so, 



170 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



but the sincerity of an artist who deserts her chosen branch of 
art when it most needs her loyalty, must be questioned. 

We may have to adjust ourselves temporarily to the business 
of meeting the problem of living, but we need not dub our craft 
a sinking ship and desert it like rats. We must stick to the 
pumps and keep it afloat. If it becomes a derelict it will be our 
fault and our shame and debt to posterity. 

— Henrietta Barclay Paist, Assistant Editor 

ir *• 

A TRIBUTE TO MABEL C. DIBBLE 

Eva E. Adams 
Miss Dibble was a woman of rare Christian character, 
living an exemplary, honorable and unselfish life, bestowing 
loving thoughts, sending messages to friends when weary 
hands would have simply turned aside from an effort. Her 
devotion to her aged mother was most touching and beautiful. 
As a ceramic artist Miss Dibble stood well to the front of 
her profession. I remember well our first meeting — and later 
the eager, cheerful face of the dear little woman, as we sat 
in Miss Louise Anderson's studio, in the Auditorium Tower, 
conferring with a half dozen women about placing an Atlan 
Exhibit in the Woman's Building at the World's Fair of 1893. 
At that time Miss Dibble was Secretary of the club, which 
office she held for seven years, and as I had the honor of being 
President, for several years, I was intimately associated 



with her. It was then that I learned to admire her sterling 
qualities, exacting in all details, never wearying, and ever 
forgetful of self in forwarding the success of the Club. With 
untiring energy and wonderful patience, she packed, listed and 
cared for each exhibitor's piece. Later she became a member 
of the Arts and Crafts Society in Boston and was the first 
woman in the West to receive the degree of Master of Arts. 
In 1909 she was invited to become a member of the Royal 
Society of Arts, London, England. 

Many of her articles and beautiful designs have ap- 
peared from time to time in Keramic Studio. Students 
from distant parts of the country have come to her for 
advice and instruction. The testimonials which have come 
to me during the past few weeks fill volumes, all emphasizing 
the value of such a friendship. A warm friend and co-worker 
writes, "I have lost a most precious friend, few we find these 
days, so just, so truthful, and honest; a wonderful example 
of self control and patience." I love to think that those who 
have passed on to where there is no sorrow, nor sighing, know 
and realize we love them and miss them. November 9, 1917, 
Miss Dibble was laid to rest in Forest Home Cemetery, in her 
old home town, Milwaukee. Dr. Edgar P. Hill, of McCor- 
roick Theological Seminary had charge of the funeral service, 
held in Chicago. He particularly described the heroic charac- 
ter of our friend when he said, "All soldiers are not in the 
trenches." Yes, she fought bravely the daily battle, fought 
a good fight to the end, and then quietly fell asleep. 




CUP AND SAUCER— ADELINE MORE 



(Treatment page 175) 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



\1\ 




JARDINIERE 

Kathryn E. Cherry 
COR outline and all dark tones use Black. Oil all light 
* bands, stems and buds and dust with Water Lily Green. 
Oil tips of buds and all the light centers of flowers and dust 
with Coffee Brown and a very small touch of Yellow Red. Oil 
petals of flowers and dust with Yellow for Dusting or they may 
be painted with Yellow Lustre. Paint remainder of design 
with Gold. 

Second Fire — Tint all of the background with a thin wash 
of Yellow Brown and a little Yellow Green and retouch Gold. 

ENAMEL TREATMENT FOR BELLEEK OR SATSUMA 

Outline with Black paint and paint all remaining black 
spaces with Black Enamel. Centers of flowers and tips of buds 
are Cafe au Lait. Petals are Citron Yellow. Stems, buds and 
light bands are 5 parts Grey Green and 1 part Blue Green. 
Leaves and remaining bands are Gold. 




172 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




Figure 4 
Designed by Albert W. Heckman. Executed by Miss A. Ruth Heckman. 

THE MAKING OF A DESIGN FOR FILET CROCHET LACE 

EVERY china decorator as well as the ordinary layman 
realizes the value of appropriate settings for her table 
service. Beautiful china calls for beautiful linen, whether it 
be in one's home or in an exhibition of one's wares. It is. 
difficult however, to procure linens in keeping with the work of 
a modern china dcorator. The stores to be sure are full of 
excellent things but where will you find ready-made just what 
you want? Either the designs are too elaborate with prices 
unreasonably high or they are of inferior quality with little or 
no individuality, such as are turned out by the hundreds. 

Recent experiments with the use of color in table linens 
have in many instances proven to be very satisfying and suc- 
cessful. Yet. they are never quite so practical as all white 
table coverings. Among the things that are all white there is 
nothing that lends itself so easily to artistic results as filet 
crochet. And furthermore, it is a thing that practically every- 
one who has ever attempted it can do. A little thoughtfulness 
in planning a design and careful workmanship in working it 
out can bring about wonderful results. 

In planning your design take a piece of squared paper and 
sketch on it one of the motifs from page 143 of the January 
issue of the Keramic Studio, or use a motif of your own. Then 
see how this can be worked out in little squares like Fig. 1 and 
Fig. 2. At first it may not seem easy but after one has made a 
few trials one will undoubtedly arrive at something similar to 
these, which are adaptations of motifs of the Mountain Ash ber- 
ries you will find on the page mentioned. 

In making a design to be applied to a lunch cloth, a buffet 
cover, a napkin, or what not, first plan the shape of the lace. 
Then make the motif fit that shape. In arranging the motif 
keep it as simple as possible and avoid fancy curves in the de- 
sign. A few straight lines and simple shapes in the abstract 
are much more to be desired and effective than any attempt at 
a realistic portrayal of a rose or a bunch of grapes with confused 
interlaced lines such as one sees so commonly. 

Even though one may not have the time to crochet the 
design herself it js well worth'the time and effort it takes to 
make a few designs. These could be used by an assistant, if 




Figure 3 
Designed by Albert W. Heckman. Executed by A. Ruth Heckman. 

necessary, in working out the designs or they could be submitted 
to the editor of a needlecraft magazine. In the latter instance 
it,is advisable to send photographs of the finished articles with 
the working drawings. There is so much work done which is 
mediocre in design that one feels, that if she had something 
worth while to offer a publisher, she ought to have no trouble 
in disposing of it. One should not think because so much 
mediocre crocheting is done that there is no art to be had in 




Figure 6 
Reproduced through courtesy of Metropolitan Museum 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



173 



Figure I 




this craft. It affords an especially fine medium for working out 
problems in dark and light arrangement. 

Fine art is a matter of fine relations. This should be borne 
in mind in planning the size of the cloth, the shape of the lace 
inserts, their arrangement on the cloth, the size of the edge and 
the placing of the design with relation to the cloth as a whole. 
Perhaps if one were to measure her work by the standard of 
excellence evident in the design and execution of the cloth 
illustrated in Fig. 5 she might arrive at something so beautiful 
that some day it would be tresured as this one is. This cloth is 
not filet crochet but it illustrates in a striking manner how 
beauty may be had through simplicity of design, thoughtful 
arrangement and careful workmanship. It shows too, how 
additional decorations may be added to a cloth in the way of 
embroidered design. 



Figure 2 








PLATE WITH BERRIES— CLARA L. CONNOR 

Omit outline. Oil outside band and dust with 3 Pearl Grey, 4 Dark Grey, 4 Apple Green, 
dust with Florentine Green. Berries and stems are Green Gold. 



Oil leaves and 



174 



KERAMIC STUDIO 






BELLEEK OR SATSUMA BOWL 

Elise Tally Hall 

TO be carried out in enamels. Outside of center circle is 
Lavender. Outside of remaining circles and center of 
center circle is Cadet Blue. Centers are Warmest Pink. 
Light part of center circle is 3 parts White, 1 part Warmest 
Pink and in the outer circles, 2 parts White and 1 part Citron 
Yellow. Leaves are Grey Green. Bands around flowers and 
at the top and bottom of panel and light bands at the bottom 
of bowl are Grey Violet. Remaining bands are Cadet Blue. 
The grey background is Sand, or it may be painted with a thin 
wash of Banding Blue, a little Copenhagen Blue and Dark Grey. 



suggestions 'fo/?- 
Supplement* 

• DESIO-N. 



SATSUMA VASE WITH ALL OVER -PATTERN 

Elise Tally Hall 

THIS may also be carried out on Belleek ware and is to be 
done in enamels. Outer part of circles in the sectional 
lines is Cafe au Lait and centers are Orange Red. Outer part 
of remaining circles is Lotus Yellow and centers are Orange 
No. 3. The remaining space in all centers is 3 parts White 
and 1 part Citron Yellow. Leaves are 1 part Sand and 1 part 
Florentine No. 2. Bands are Oak Brown. Dark tone at 
top and bottom is Cafe au Lait. 




FULL SIZE SECTION OF MEDALLION 



Suggestions from the Color Supplement — Adeline AIsop Rob.'neau 
*• I** 

CHOCOLATE POT, CUP AND SAUCER— (Color Study) 

Albert W. Heckman 

THIS design is to be carried out with soft enamels on Belleek 
ware. A cool green such as an Egyptian turquoise 
• with a light and a dark yellow were used for the effect given 
in the illustration. 

CHINA CUP (Page 176) 

Lola A. St. John 

OIL grey tones and dust with Florentine Green. Remainder 
of design is Green Gold. For the second fire paint the 
lighter tone in center of flowers with Yellow Green. 

FRUIT MOTIF FOR FRUIT BOWL (Page 177) 

Leah Rodman Tubby 

OIL and dust grapes and all lines on the bowl with 2 parts 
Dark Blue for Dusting, \ part Violet, 1 part Ivory Glaze, 
Oil leaves, stems and small squares above panel and dust 
with Water Lily Green. Oil fruit and dust with 3 parts Deep 
Ivory and 1 Peach Blossom. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



175 



CUP AND SAUCER (Page 170) 

Kathryn E. Cherry 

OUTLINE the tips of buds in the conventional part and 
dust with Water Blue or Banding and a little Copen- 
hagen. Oil buds and stems or remainder of light part of con- 
ventional and dust with 1 Grey Blue, 1 Water Lily Green, 1 
Ivory Glaze. The dark bands are Gold. Paint flowers in 



medalions with^Deep Blue Green and a little Violet, leaving the 
light part white. Centers are Albert Yellow shaded with Yel- 
low Brown. Leaves are Apple Green and a little Copenhagen 
Blue. Shadows are Blood Red and a little Violet. The re- 
maining surface of the cup and saucer is tinted with a delicate 
wash of Albert Yellow and Dark Grey. 




SERVICE PLATE— MAY B. HOELSCHER 



CIRST Firing— Lay in the design in black outline. Back- 
1 ground of flowers Yellow Brown and Brown Green equal 
parts. Second Firing— Retouch outlines. Flower and leaves 
are in flat enamel. For flowers use Silver Yellow mixed 



with enamel shaded into a real delicate yellow. Centers 
Yellow Red. For leaves use Apple Green, touch of Deep 
Purple and Black. Always test the enamels before applying. 
Lay in gold. 



176 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




SHERBET GLASS IN ENAMELS AND LUSTRE— LOLA A. ST. JOHN 
(Treatment for China page 174) 

ENAMEL DECORATION FOR GLASS 

D. M. Campana 

IF you ask an old practical glass decorator how to produce 
successful relief -paste- work and relief enamel decorations, 
he will wink his eye and tell you that everybody can do it 
well, that a wise person will not give away his trade secrets, etc. 
|2 ^ Every decorator is believed to have a special method, or a 
special enamel, or oil to mix them, or a special nack to apply 
it, but in the end every successful decorator does it very nearly 
in the same manner, and he will not undertake any work with 
anything else but what he knows by experience to be good. 

On the contrary, students will try many different materials, 
sometimes because they don't know what is best, sometimes 
because their teacher told them so, and sometimes just to see 
how it works, the result being that they do not produce good 
work, lose confidence and besides lose glass, time and money. 
The spirit of experimenting is a commendable spirit, but rather 
costly, and as I have done a large quantity of fancy enamel 
work on Venetian Glass, I will gladly help the student with a 
few fundamental suggestions. 

Many enamels on the market are used by experienced 
decorators in glass factories with splendid results. Those 
decorators have studied and found the proper enamel for the 
special brand of glass they are painting, and it fires very well. 
It must be understood, however, that the body of glass itself 
has a certain influence on the enamels used in those decora- 
tions. In my working, I found that by a small addition of a 
special Kaolin to a good staple white enamel, this enamel 
works more steadily and surely when applied over any kind 
of glass. 

This is a great advantage. If you have a good reliable 
White Enamel, you already know a good deal toward success- 
ful enamel work. 

When I come to mix it, the Kaolin makes my enamel 
much smoother, and enamel must be very smooth. As to 
mixing of the enamel, I use nothing else but pure clean turpen- 
tine. I place on the slab the certain quantity of powder enamel 
required for the whole work, heap it up on a corner of the slab, 
take now with my knife a part of it and moisten with turpen- 
tine, smoothing it down carefully. I then heap it up. 

One of the general mistakes of students is to mix glass 
enamels too thick, I mix mine rather liquid, perhaps like 
cream, and mix only a small quantity at a time so as to have it 
always fresh. If you mix much of it at a time, the turpentine 
will evaporate before you use it up, and you are compelled to 
keep adding turpentine, in this way making the enamel too fat. 



On the contrary, this small lot is easily used up, and a new lot 
quickly made. For every stroke I apply, I take new enamel 
and try to make every stroke work correctly without having 
to go over and over. It is true that turpentine alone will not 
give a thick, high body to the enamel, but it will avoid the 
boiling of the enamel one hundred per cent, and this lesson is 
meant for students rather than experienced artists, for the 
person that wishes to do well without much experimenting, 
rather than for a practical glass decorator 

If I wish to give more body to the enamel I add either a 
drop of tar oil, or a drop of fresh Damar Varnish to .twenty 
drops of fresh turpentine, but for general enamel work on 
glass you do not require much of thickness and the turpentine 
alone will be good and safe. 

In other words, enamel boiling is caused sometimes by bad 
enamel, but more often by too much fat or bad oils used in 
mixing. I also dry my enamels well before I fire them, as the 
drying of the enamel during the firing affects the fusing action 
of the enamel itself. 

I warn students that the keeping of the turpentine-mixed 
enamel in good condition requires some practice. Stir it up 
often, adding a trifle of turpentine so that it will keep always in a 
good running consistency, and discard what was left over or 
has dried. Above all have it half liquid. 

As for the brush I use long red sables, called Dresden 
liner, I clean my brush often of the old enamel, and scoop up 
enamel for every stroke. Referring to colored enamels, I find 
that these are not always reliable, and do often boil, so that I 
generally apply my enamel plain white, fire, and paint over 
it with colors on the second firing. 

Colors used over enamel should properly be glass colors 
as these are more soft than china colors. Another good use 
for enamel is a flat background, that (after firing) can be used 




SAT SUM A VASE— Design suitable for glass enamel 



KERAMICf STUDIO 



177 




FRUIT BOWL— LEAH RODMAN TUBBY (Treatment page 174) 

as a surface to paint monograms, or even designs, figures, 
flowers, etc. 

To be good, effects in enamel work over transparent glass 
should be delicate and light. Heavy designs, solid bands and 
showy flowers in enamel, give a clumsy appearance to the 
glass and make it cheap looking. On the other hand, a small 
festoon of flowers, or a delicate running design or light scrolls 
in a border form, with enamel, will be pretty, especially on 
bowls, dishes, or any kind of low shaped glass. 

As I mentioned before, I find it always more satisfactory 
to apply the enamel work, plain white, fire it, and paint it over 
with glass colors (not lustres) in the second firing. 

In mixing these glass colors, I again use turpentine as a 
medium, with a trifle of Damar varnish added to the turpentine. 
This to make the medium as reliable as possible. 

I have, in experimenting, applied the colors over the well 
dried white enamel, before this latter was fired, but though the 
work was sometimes successful, I find it would be dangerous 
for students, apt to tamper too much with the white enamel 
underneath. 

Taken all together, the important points for students to 
follow in enamel work, are as follows: 

1. See that you have a dependable smooth white enamel. 

2. Use no oils. Turpentine pure is good. When you 
are well acquainted with the work, you may add a trifle of 
fresh oil of tar or Damar, but very little. Use none at present. 

. 3. Have your enamel nearly liquid. Take up enamel 
for every stroke you apply. Clean your brush continually of 
the dried out enamel and stir up fresh, but small quantities of 
enamel. Throw old enamels aside. Apply the stroke in the 
proper place and do not tamper with it. 





Medallion for Center of Fruit Bowl 



Medallion for Sides of Fruit Bowl 



4. Dry your enamel thoroughly, in a hot place, before 
firing. 

5. Fire at a trifle higher heat than lustres. You can do 
this by placing enamel pieces a* little back in the kiln. 

6. Apply white enamel, and if necessary, paint over on 
the second firing with glass colors. 

The next lesson will be on gold decoration on glass. 

DESIGNS FROM THE WILD ROSE HIP (Page 181) 

M. Janie Launt 

BORDER I — Rose-hip, Red Orange; leaves, Shading Green; 
stems, Copenhagen Grey with touch of Shading Green; 
black bands and vertical lines of Red Gold ; black outlines. 

Border and medallion — Seed pods, Silver Yellow toned 
with Orange; other white units Orange; seeds, Hair Brown; 
other black units Olive Green; vertical lines of background, 
Bronze; black outline. 

Motif III — Rose-hip, I Orange; stem, Olive Green with 
touch of Orange, with same color in sepals of the rose hip; 
leaves, Moss Green with Olive Green. 

Motif IV — Rose hip, Red Orange; leaves, Moss Green 
and Shading Green; stems, Bronze; sepals, Bronze. 

Design V — Rose hips at center, Orange Yellow, with Red 
Orange sepals; stems, Moss Green and Hair Brown; leaves, 
Apple Green; black center and spots within stem, Orange; 
dots, Orange Enamel. 

Medallion Design VI — Center rose hip, Red Orange with 
Green Blue sepals; back, rose hips, Orange Yellow with Violet 
Blue sepals; stems, Violet Red; leaves, Yellow Green. 

Border Design VII — Large leaves, Apple Green; small 
leaves, Bright Yellow Green; rose hips, Orange Yellow with 
Violet Grey sepals; horizontal lines, Violet of Gold; dots, 
Yellow enamel; black outlines; stems, Soft Grey Green, 



178 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



PLATE (February Color Study) 

May B. Hoelscher 
lTMRST Firing — Outline everything except large flowers in 
*- - black. Outline large flowers in gold. Lay all geomet- 
rical figures in gold except drop design which is in Delft blue. 
The center of this design is in gold. Background of border 
Yellow Brown and Brown Green, equal parts. Center of plate 
the same only padded very light. 

Second Fire— Three large flowers are first Delft Blue, shaded 
in three tones, The outer one is the darkest. Second Yellow 
Brown and the third Old Rose. "Brown 4 and Deep Purple." 
Leaves, Apple Green, touch of Deep Purple and Black. Small 
flowers group; center flower Delft Blue with gold center, small 
flowers, one on either side, Old Rose. Center gold. Mix the 
colors for flowers and leaves with enamels and test, then lay, 
in flat enamel. Lay all gold twice. 



ART NOTE 

In the January number of the "Century" Magazine are 
examples of American Craftsmanship photographed by Hazel 
H. Adler. Out of ten groups five are examples of keramic art. 
Mrs. Adelaide Alsop Robineau is represented by a group of 
her beautiful incised porcelains. Leon Volkmar and Jeanne 
Durant Rice have collaborated on a beautiful dinner set of 
white majolica. There is a group of interesting pottery from 
the Newcomb College, New Orleans and two breakfast sets 
in overglaze decoration by artists familiar to Keramic Studio 
readers, Anna Southern Tardy of Birmingham, Ala., and Mrs. 
Sarah A. Draegert of Brooklyn, N. Y. The other five groups 
are examples of wood carving, designing and weaving and 
metal work. 




SALAD BOWL AND PLATE— M. LOUISE ARNOLD 

Black, Black; grey, Green; white, Gold; or Black and Silver on Celadon Ware. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



179 




ELDERBERRY BLOSSOM VASE— ALBERT W. HECKMAN 



THIS design is to be carried out in flat colors dusted on. 
Draw in the design and dust all the background with 
Grey Blue. Clean out all the design and dust the flowers with 
Yellow for Dusting, allowing an edge around the flowers with- 



in the design. Second Fire — Oil and dust all the leaves and 
stems with Water Lily Green one part and Glaze for Green 
four parts. Third Fire— Dust the whole vase with Glaze for 
Green and clean the color from over the flowers. 



180 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



BEGINNERS* CORNER 

JESSIE M. BARD ----.__ Editor 

Dickinson Seminary, Williamsport, Pa. 



KATHRYN E. CHERRY'S PLATE 

Kathryn E. Cherry 
OAINT all dark tones except tips of berries with Green Gold. 
*~ The berries are White Gold or Silver. Tips of berries 
are Yellow Brown and a touch of Yellow Red Grey. Space 
near edge of plate is Yellow Brown Lustre or a thin wash of 
Yellow Brown paint. 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

G. W. P .—1— Can you tell me of as good a book on "Color" as Batchelder's 
is on design, and do you know of any color charts and where same can be gotten? 

2. — Are colored enamels opaque enough to fire the same color on blue, mauve 
and yellow Japanese -pottery, as they are on white china"! 

1. There are a great many good books out on Color. Write to Brentano, 
New York City for information. Arthur Dow has a hook on Design with 



quite a little space devoted to color. The Prang Co., Chicago, or New York 
office has color charts. 

2. Yes, the enamels will not be affected by color under them. 

L. D. — Sometime ago in giving an account of an exhibition of Keramic 
work you spoke of a group beautifully done in "splash lustre" work. What do 
you mean by "splash lustre" work and how is it done? 

The term is probably a local one, it probably is the method of flowing 
one color into another obtaining a variegated effect. Two brushes are neces- 
sary for this using a separate brush for each color in order not to mix the lustres 
Apply as ordinarily working first with one color and then the other. 

H. B. K. 1 — As a gift from a friend I received with much pleasure the 
January Keramic Studio. 

I— In it is a design by Mrs. H. B. Paist. The outline is not given in the 
treatment. I want to use it on a fruit set. Thought of using green gold for panels 
band and outline of stems and leaves with the treatment given. 

I made a design with stick printing that is suggestive of wall paper and lino- 
leum and after reading the article on textile designing in the magazine I am 
determined to try again but would like to send my design to a critic to find if it is 
■worthy of consideration. Where should such design be sent? 

1. The gold will be affright as you suggest or you may omit the outline 
entirely. 

2. The design could be sent to any teacher of design, a number of them 
being advertised in this magazine or it could be sent to a factory manufactur- 
ing linoleum. 





PLATE DESIGN— KATHRYN E. CHERRY 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



181 




DESIGNS[ADAPTEP FROMJTHE WILD ROSE-HIP— M. JANIE LAUNT (Treatment page 177) 



182 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




DESIGN FOR MARMALADE JAR AND PLATE— FLORENCE McCRAY 



Lines back of design, bands and handles Green Gold. Oranges Orange Enamel shaded. Leaves Dull Green Enamel. 

Stems Red Brown. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



183 




SNOWBERRIES— MARGARET WATKEYS 



OUTLINE is Shading Green and Copenhagen Blue. . Light 
part of berries is left white and shaded with Albert Yel- 
low and a little Violet with Brown Green^added^for'deepest 
shadows. Stems are Violet, Brown Green' and a little Blood 



Red. Leaves are Yellow Green, Shading Green and Copen- 
hagen Blue with Brown Green added for the darker tones. 
Background is Dark Grey and a little Banding Blue. 



*84 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



ART NOTES 

Twenty-four members of the Twin City Keramic Club 
met at luncheon in St. Paul on Friday, Jan. the 18th, after 
which they visited the Minnesota State Capital accompanied 
by Mr. Lauros M. Phoenix, a local Mural Artist, who analysed 
the mural decorations throughout the building for the benefit 
of the Club. The mural paintings include some of the most 
important work of such well known men as John LaFarge, 
Kenyon Cox, Blashfield and Simmons, besides many wall 
paintings by lesser lights. 



A class has been formed in St. Paul, Minn., to study de- 
sign under the direction of Henrietta Barclay Paist. The 
course will consist of at least twelve lessons and will continue 
into the spring months 

Now, while the demand for the finished products is light, 
is the time to study, to prepare for busier times sure to come 
after the war. A conscientious study of the principles of design 
doubles the efficiency of a decorator. China decorators, take 
notice and take advantage of the lull instead of bemoaning the 
lack of demand. 




PLATE BORDER— MRS. F. H. HANNEMAN 



Oil leaves sand stems and dust with Water Green No. 2, Oil grey band and dust with 1 Dove Grey and 1 Pearl Grey. 

Outline and dark bands are Green Gold. Second Fire — Paint over flowers and buds with a thin wash of Albert Yellow 

and Yellow Brown and wide space at edge with Pearl Grey, and a little Albert Yellow. 





Take full advantage 

of these 
cut prices given to 

YOU 

as a supporter of 

Keramic Studio 



A REMARKABLE BOOK OFFER! 

50 per cent Discount on the Following: 

IT TO SUBSCRIBERS ONLY ! ~M 

Regular Price. 

Class Room No. 1 . Art of Teaching, etc., $3.00 

" No. 2. Flower Painting, etc., 3.00 

" No. 3. Figure Painting, etc., 3.00 

" No. 4. Conventional Decoration, etc. 3.00 
Little Things to Make, 2&£3ft& SS^&S 2.00 

Book of Cups and Saucers, 1.50 

SPECIAL NOTICE — We cannot deliver these books post paid at cnt prices, therefore add 15 cents for each book ordered 



Cf 



«« 



THIS IS AN OPPORTUNITY 
OPEN TO ALL SUBSCRIBERS OF KERAMIC STUDIO. 

Either New or Renewal. 



KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO., SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



The entire contents of thisTHagazine are corned by the general copyright and the articles must not be reprinted without special permissio 

CONTENTS OF APRIL, 1918 



Editorial 

W, S. S. Design Competition 

Chicago Ceramic Art Association 

Unity of Art 

Table Runners 

Tile for Book End 

Work Bag 

Gold Work on Glass 

Motif for Enamels on Glass or China 

Motif for Enamels on Glass or China 

The Linen Page 

Vase, Spiderwort Motif 

Decorated Porcelains Winning First Prizes at the 

Mineola Fan- 
Sugar and Creamer 
Beginner's Corner 
Creamer 
Cop andSaucer 
Child's Bread and Milk Set 
Plate and Bowl (Color Supplement) 



Henrietta Barclay Paist 
Cornelia A. Newman 
Henrietta Barclay Paist 
Cornelia A. Newman 
D. M. Campana 
Laurel G. Foster 
Flora Leland 
Jetta Ehlers 
Mrs. John Ehlers 

Maud M. Mason 
May E. Reynolds Judson 
Jessie M. Bard 
Georgia B. Spainhower 
Mary L. Brigham 
Hill^Carter Lucas 
Hill Carter Lucas 



135 
185 
186-189 
190, 191 
190 
191 
19J 
192 
192 
192 
193 
194 

194, 195 
196 
197 
197 
197 
198 



LUNN'S PRACTICAL POTTERY 

for 

ART TEACHERS AND STUDENTS 

2 volumes with about one hundred illustrations 
$4.00 postpaid. 



These volumes sold separately for $2.15 each postpaid, 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO. 
SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



Rare Volumes of Keramic Studio Magazine ! 

Volume 9 Loose numbers complete 

2 sets only $4.00 each 
Volume 12 Loose numbers complete 

2 sets only $4.00 each 

BOUND VOLUMES $5.50 EACH! 

In volumes 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 

Express or postpaid 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO., SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



FOR SALE. ! "WILKE" STUDIO CHINA KILN with all accessories. 
First check for $35.00 gets this bargain. It is almost new I 
Write at once to 
- P. N. STYLES, Bhinebeck, N. Y. 



THESE BOOKS SENT POST-PAID 
ON RECEIPT OF PRICE 

Mrs. Filkin's A. B. C. for Beginners in China Painting $1.00 

How to apply Enamels by Mabel C. Dibble.. . .50 

Book on Methods for painting in Water Color by Gertrude Estnbrook 1.00 

Colors and Coloring in China Painting 25 

Lunn'e Practical Pottery, 2 vola. (or vols, sold singly $2.15 eaoh) 4.00 

The Teacher of China Painting by D. M. Campari. 

Firing China and Glass by Campana .37 

Book of Monograms by Campana 

Books 2 and 3 "Decorative Designs," by Campana, each ... .83 

'Water Color Painting," Designs by Campagna,. . .53 

'The Teacher of Oil Painting," Designs by Campana .53 

Flat En&mal Decoration in China by Mrs. L. T. Steward 1.25 

Home Furnishing by Alice M. Kellogg (Pub. at 1.50) 

The Human Figure by Vanderpoo! 2.00 

Marks of American Potters by E. A. Barb 2.2S 

American Glassware, Old and New .1.00 

Grand Feu Ceramics 500 

The Fruit Book ... 3.00 

The Rose Book . 3.00 

The Art of Teaching China Decoration, Class Room No. 1 3.00 

Flower Painting on Porcelain, Class Room No. 2 ... 3.00 

Figure Painting on Porcelain and Firing, Class Room No. 3 3.00 

Conventional Decoration of Pottery and Porcelain, Class Room No. 4.. 3.00 

Book of Cups and Saucers i,go 

Book of Little Things to Make ... 2.00 

Keramic Decorations Nellie F. Mcintosh. 1,00 

Eberlein & McClure's "Practical Book of Early American Arts and 

Crafts," post paid, net .. q.qq 

"Handicrafts for the Handicapped" by Herbert J. Hall and Mertice M. 

C. Buck, post paid . 1.35 

Pottery for Artists, Craftsmen and Teachers by Geo. J. Cox, 1,35 

Design and the Decoration of Porcelain, by Henrietta Barclay Paist 

Paper Cover $1.50 Cloth Cover $2.50 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 



When writing to advertisers please mention this magaiinc 




PLATE AND BOWL-HILL CARTER LUCAS 



APRI L 1918 
KERAMIC STUDIO 



KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 

SYRACUSE. N. Y. 



Paint the black and let it stand about an hour and then dust over it with Black, this is easier than to oil the fine 
black lines and gives the same effect. Second Fire — Paint the orange color with Orange Lustre. 



Vol. XIX, No. 12. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



April 1918 




E notice with pleasure that dealers 
are beginning to take interest in 
glass shapes and to advertise their 
stock. We receive constantly let- 
ters from decorators in small places 
asking us where they can find glass 
shapes. In fact decorators are, as 
we expected, paying much attention 
to this work in addition to their 
work in china which is handicapped 
by the scarcity and high prices. And finally dealers seeing 
this growing demand are making arrangements for handling 
glass in addition to their regular lines of china. 

One dealer writes to us: "Glass is fast supplanting china 
for the amateur decorator. Many designs for china may 
just as well be applied to glass and we are surprised that more 
dealers are not advertising glass in your columns. We have 
tried it for over a year and find that we have worked up quite 
a trade for the glass itself. We are sending you an advertise- 
ment of our glass stock for the April issue." 
K » 
Dean Bossange of the School of Applied Design, Carnegie 
Institute of Technology, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, announces 
some special courses for undergraduates which will bring about 
a more complete co-operation between the High Schools and 
an Art School than has been accomplished elsewhere. These 
qualifying courses, as they are called, are to be given on Satur- 
days and are open to all students of High Schools or Prepara- 
tory Schools of corresponding grade. Instruction will be en- 
tirely technical in character and being limited to Saturday 
mornings will not interfere in any way with the work of the 
High Schools. The main object of the course is to encourage 
the boys and girls of Pittsburgh and vicinity to begin their 
technical work in art when they are still in the impressionable 
age. 

These courses will make it possible for a High School stu- 
dent to do four years of elementary technical work before he 
enters the design school and begins the advanced technical work 
leading to the Bachelor's Degrees offered in the five arts repre- 
sented in that institution. 

It is not expected that all students taking these courses 
will attempt to become artists. The courses will be of value 
nevertheless to those who do not continue because of the 
educational discipline involved, and the wider appreciation 
of art and deeper interest in it that will be^ awakened. Higher 
standards and better art should result from this co-operation. 
When it is realized that High School students having taken 
four years of qualifying work and four of advanced technical 
work will have had eight consecutive years of the best techni- 
cal training before receiving their degrees, the optimism of 
those in charge of the courses seems fully justified. 

Courses will be offered in Architectural Drafting, Free- 
hand Drawing and Modeling as preparation for entrance 
to the Department of Architecture. In the Department of 
Painting and Decoration instruction will be given in Free- 
hand Drawing, Design, Color, Sketching from costume model 
and a short course in Modeling. In the department of Music in- 
struction will be given in all instruments of the symphony 
orchestra, each student receiving one individual lesson of 



one-half hour per week. In addition to this, class lessons 
in Solfeggio and Elementary Harmony will be given and a 
weekly orchestra rehearsal. In the department of Dramatic 
Arts instruction will consist of exercises in diction, pantomime, 
the rehearsal and public performance of simple one act plays 
and a short period of Folk Dancing. Department of sculpt- 
ure offers a course in modeling in clay, beginning with very 
simple forms and -advancing as rapidly as the ability of the 
student will justify. 

For the present the Design School will limit those courses 
to 180 students, selected by competition from those recom- 
mended by the principals. The courses will continue for a 
period of fifteen weeks. At the end of that period an exhi- 
bition will be held and a concert and dramatic performance 
given. An enrollment fee of five dollars is required but this 
fee will be returned to those who do satisfactory work and are 
regular in attendance. 



WS.S. 

WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 



ISSUED 



BY THE 



UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 



W. S. S. DESIGN COMPETITION 

The War Savings Committee of New York, Frederick W. 
Allen, director, has organized a design competition for Poster, 
Cartoon, Newspaper Advertisement, Window Card, etc., with 
prizes of $2,000, as follows: 

Poster — First prize, $1,000; second prize, $300. Designs 
to be made in proportion to 24 inches wide by 36 inches high . 
Shape and size optional with the designer, the work does not 
have necessarily to fill the entire area. 

Newspaper, Magazine Advertisement, and Cartoon — First 
prize, $250; second prize, $100. Designs to be in proportion 
to quarter, half or full page newspaper, or in proportion to 5f 
inches wide by 8 inches high for magazines. 

Car Card and Window Card — First prize, $250; second 
prize, $100. Car card designs in proportion to 21 inches vude 
by 11 inches high. Size optional for window cards. 

The competition will close on April 25th. All entries must 
be sent prepaid, carefully packed. Any medium may be used, 
pen and ink, oil, water color, chalk, etc. Competitors may 
send in as many designs as they wish and enter all classes or 
two or one, as preferred. Text matter or wording is left en- 
tirely to the designer, but the W. S. S. mark illustrated with 
this notice must appear in all designs, and if the designs are in 
color, this mark should be yellow for the background, blue for 
the lettering, bands and medallion. 

Address all entries and inquiries to W. S. S. Competition, 
American Institute of Graphic Arts, 119 E. 19th St., New York. 



186 



KERAMIC STUDIO 





MRS. ANNE TAYLOR BROWN 



IONE LIBBY WHEELER 
Lustre Ware 




MARIE B. BOHMANN 

(Dr. Gunsaulus Prize) 



GRACE E. MINISTER 




CHICAGO CERAMIC ART ASSOCIATION 

r I ^HE Twenty-fifth annual exhibition of the Chicago Ceramic 
A Art Association, held at the Art Institute in the fall, 
was the best, both as to number and excellence of exhibits, 
given by the club during recent years. The work showed the 
good effects of the last year's study course, which has been, in 
the opinion of all, the best the club has ever had. In addition 
to Miss Bennett's invaluable criticism once a month, lessons in 
design and color, based on Mr. Ralph Johonnot's method, were 
conducted by Mrs. Edward L. Humphrey, and during the 
month of May Miss Ophelia Foley of Bridgeport, Conn., 
conducted a very helpful class for members of the association. 
The exhibition was held in one of the new galleries of the 
Art Institute and was well placed and lighted. The president, 
Mrs. Anne T. Brown, was represented by a number of pieces 
of unusual merit, a chop-suey bowl in lavender, blue and 
grey-green and pitcher in yellow, orange, lavender and green, 
being especially rich in color and good in design. A tea-caddy 
in antique effect produced by a combination of lustre, red bronze, 
green and Roman gold, a Belleek compote and small Satsuma 
vase were attractive in their handling. 




GRACE E. MINISTER 

MARIE B. BOHMAXX 



MRS. SENGENBERGER 

GRACE E. MINISTER 



MRS. ISABELLE C. KISSINGER 
Awarded A. H. Abbott Prize for best Individual Exhibit 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



187 




MRS. A. A. McGINNIS 

Miss Marie Bohmann, who received the Dr. Frank Gun- 
saulus Prize for decoration on pottery, showed a Japanese 
wistaria tea-service with a tasteful decoration, and several 
other pottery pieces, quite unusual in treatment. 

Another member who worked with success on Japanese 
pottery was Mrs. Nellie Sengenberger of Peoria, 111., whose 
large blue lamp-vase was a striking note in the exhibition. 

Mrs. George Emmons' covered vase designed in warm 
colors with black enamel background richly deserved the 
Honorable Mention which was given it. Her Satsuma lamp vase 
was unusual and interesting in color and design, being done in a 
wonderful shade of old-rose and harmonious greens, with a 
touch of brown. Among her other smaller pieces were two 
very well designed boxes and a unique miniature teapot. 

Mrs. Isabelle C. Kissinger was awarded the A. H. Abbott 
Prize for Best Collection. It was most varied and interesting, 
showing work on Satsuma, Belleek, Faience, Wedgwood pot- 
tery and tiles. The largest piece, a Satsuma lamp vase, was 
charming in blues and soft tans. A grey pottery teapot and 
bowl, designed in blue, attracted much attention. Several 



MRS. GRACE P. BUSH 
Awarded Burley y Co. Prize for most appropriate design for tableware 




IONE LIBBY WHEELER 

Awarded the Dr. Gunsaulus Prize for Lustrcd Glass 




OLIVE M. JOHNSON 
Awarded Devoe & Raynolds Prize for Plaque in Enamel 



MRS. A. H. McGINNIS 



MRS, GRACE BUSH 
MRS. ANNE T. BROWN OLIVE M. JOHNSON 

ISABELLE C. KISSINGER 



188 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




MRS. G. E. EMMONS 

pieces designed in copper lustre made a rich note in the exhi- 
bition. The Belleek cracker jar with an unusual bird design 
in old blue was one of the best in this splendid collection. 

Miss Florence McCray was given the Hasburg Gold Prize 
for a most unique handling of etched gold in a four piece tea set. 
Red bronze gold was used as a background for a border design 
in white and roman gold, the whole brought into harmony by 
a "rich Satsuma tint. The same coloring was used on a plate 
with peacock border. She also showed a Sedji tea-set in 
green and white gold. 

Dr. Frank A. Gunsaulus Prize for glass was given to Miss 
lone Wheeler. Her lustred glass was interesting in color and 
shape. She exhibited a number of lustred porcelain pieces, a 
large peacock vase was a beautifully developed piece, a rich 
rose lustre vase was most attractive. A copper lustre tea set, 
also one in blue, and smaller pieces of varied lovely colors 
completed this collection. 

Miss Mary Thrash showed two pieces, a well executed 
tile and fruit dish in soft colors. 




MRS. J. B. EMISON MRS. E. T. PHELPS 

MRS. MARGUERITE J. ROOD MISS MARY THRASH 

MISS MARY E. HIPPLE MISS IRENE ANDERSON 
MISS FLORENCE McCRAY— Awarded Hasburg Gold Prize for Etched Plate 
and Tea set 



MRS. ISABELLE C. KISSINGER 

Miss Irene Anderson sent a Satsuma trinket box, sugar 
and creamer, and dresser set, all showing careful work in both 
design and execution. 

A charming pair of small vases, a Satsuma box and a very 
effective larger vase made a small but strong exhibit for Mrs. 
E. T. Phelps. 

Mrs. Rood was represented by a pleasing vase, with dark 
brown background and border designed in orange lustre and gold. 

Mrs. Grace Bush sent a collection characterized by good 
design and harmonious coloring. The lamp-vase, bowl with 
bird motif, in peacock tones, and suggestion for dinner set 
were especially good. The latter was awarded the Burley & 
Co. prize for the most appropriate design for tableware. 

Mrs. J. B. Emison also showed successful tableware, a set 
of dinner plates in enamels and gold were noteworthy for 
daintiness of design and careful execution. 




Colors used— Alic 



ANNE TAYLOR BROWN 
Panel for Belleek Compote in Photo 
Blue, French Violet, Plum, Light Green, Yellow and Orange 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



189 



A snappy little luncheon set, in blue and white, was sent 
by Miss Mary E. Hippie, whose other pieces were also of 
interest, notably a flat Belleek bowl, in dull pinks and greens, 
and a Satsuma vase of vibrating blues and greens. 

Miss Olive Johnson was awarded the Devoe & Reynolds 
prize for the best individual piece, a large Satsuma placque 
with an all-over design in enamels, lavender, blue and black 
predominating. Her pieces were characterized by originality 
of design and very successful handling. 

Another worker who specialized in pottery was Mrs. A. 
H. McGinnis. She caught the spirit of the ware in her freely 



executed designs. Her Satsuma vases and bowl were also 
treated in an interesting way. 

Miss Grace E. Minister was represented by a well de- 
signed tea set in turquoise blue, green and Roman gold, a scarlet 
Japanese ware plate decorated in a geometric pattern in black 
enamel, and several unusual pottery vases. 

Despite the heavy demand on the time of all members for 
patriotic work, each one is making an earnest effort to be worth- 
ily represented next year and thus help to keep up art activities 
and interest. The Club will furnish the usual course in de- 
sign which is always well attended. 



/\ Xns/cje, bordch 




Border of Bowl shown in Group at Chicago Exhibition 



BORDER FOR FLOWER POT OR BOWL— ISABELLE C. KISSINGER 



AS shown in the photo this border was used on a Satsuma 
flower-pot 3 1 inches high, the spaces between motifs and 
lower part being covered with Green Blue enamel. The motifs 
were left the glaze of the ware with accents of enamel as fol- 
lows: narrow oval in upper center Deep Purple, the space next 
inside, Lavender Blue, scallop Dull Yellow with a line of Orange 
on the inside, while the smaller oval was Lavender with a 
Black center. The thin pointed bars on each side the oval 
and the panel at the bottom between motifs, Apple Green; 
the long curving bars in center same blue as background, 
the "hooks" at each side Lavender, with Yellow center. The 
small panels between the large motifs Dark Green . The blue on 
enamel background ran over the edge and § of an inch on 
the inside, as indicated, the small ovals being Lavender with 
a black center and the line below Apple Green. The inside 
below this line was tinted with Light Green lustre. 

II. For a bowl use color scheme as follows: 

Tint outside with Orange lustre padded. Add a band at 
bottom of border and lay background space with Roman 
gold, picking out design with white gold and red gold bronze with 
accents of Turquoise Blue enamel. 

III. Outline with Dark Green, use green lustre, green 
gold, and work out design in greenish blue and Red Violet 
enamels with a touch of Orange. 

ART NOTE 

A unique and interesting function was staged in the Min- 
neapolis Institute of Art last winter. It was in the nature of a 
fancy dress carnival and nearly five thousand persons assembled, 
most of them in costume and in true gala spirit. 



There were groups in each of the period rooms in appro- 
priate attire. These has been planned for by those in charge 
of the revel. 

There were three entertainments staged — one a clever 
play by the "Attic Club." There were tableaux vivants pre- 
sented on a stage at the east end of the wide corridor on the 
second floor. All were full of color and delightfully posed and 
accompanied by special music from a concealed orchestra. 
Shortly before midnight a chorus under the direction of a 
choir master from one of the Churches led the huge company 
in singing carols and other appropriate songs until the chimes 
announced the advent of the New Year. Then all of the cos- 
tumed throng formed a long line and marched in joyous pro- 
cession through the galleries and corridors of the second floor 
down the broad stairway for a similar tour of the main floor, 
making a spectacular finale to an unusual evening. . 

** *** 

Gentlemen: — Enclosed please find check for $4.00 to cover Keramic 
Studio for another year. 

I imagine I am one of a very few Keramic teachers who has a better 
business this year than for the last two years. Soon after the war broke out 
and every one was talking nothing but war, I decided to have no war talk in my 
studio, or at least as little as possible. My studio is a large one and light 
and airy so I make it as attractive as possible. It is now the one recreation 
of many pupils to come up to the studio and work. We often have little 
lunches and work all day. They all say they go away feeling better. Most 
of them have some one in the camps or at the front. I have one brother 
in the camps in this country and one somewhere in France. I have 20 pupils 
every week and then odd ones dropping in. 

Thought this might help some other teachers. 

Yours truly, 

E. M. L. 



190 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




■<:•'.'*: .--s 




ards. How many homes we see with rich hangings and 
oriental rugs but inartistic couch pillows and table runners. 
Some homes which are the product of the commercial In- 
terior Decorators have every luxury except well chosen pic- 
tures or china. How many china decorators have never 
given a serious thought to the study of interior decoration 
with the view of making their homes a harmonious setting 
for the porcelain they are decorating? 

How many pictorial artists shrug their shoulders when 
keramic art is mentioned— as if they knew little and cared 
less about the subject. How many musicians are there 
who appreciate the value of color in their surroundings, the 
psychological effect it has on the emotions and on the creative 
instinct? We must enlarge the opening through which we are 
looking at life if we would see art as a unity and develop more 
uniformity. We must recognize the interdependence of all 
departments of art if we would seek a permanent place for 
our own specialty. 

The thing that is not born of necessity will not long 
survive. "No man liveth to himself alone." No branch 
of art can exist independent of all the other arts. So, friends, 
let us welcome and encourage and study to appreciate all 
art expression and not begrudge a part of our space to art 
products expressed in other mediums. Let us try to see 
them as necessary adjuncts to our products and hope for a 




TABLE RUNNER No. I— CORNELIA A. NEWMAN 



UNITY OF ART 

Henrietta Barclay Paist, Ass't Editor 

THE Art embroideries illustrated in this issue are the work 
of Miss Cornelia Newman and were shown — with other 
specimens — at the Minneapolis Art Institute in November 
last, and formed a brilliant and charming bit in the exhibition. 
The Art of embroidery has been slow to adapt itself to the 
modern thought concerning design, but there are a few pio- 
neers who having mastered the problem of design, have put 
their theories into practice in this direction. Among these the 
names of Mr. and Mrs. Johonnot stand out prominently. 
Miss Waldvogal, of Pasadena, is a Swiss woman, another 
individualistic worker, who is combining strong design and 
craftsmanship. It was in her studio that Miss Newman 
studied and while some of the designs show strongly the 
influence of the teacher, she is nevertheless fast evolving 
a style of her own and her craftsmanship is sincere and her 
sense of color harmony strong. 

When one sees specimens of embroidery like these one 
cannot helping associating them with the surroundings which 
they merit. 

It makes little difference what materials and tools we 
employ if we are interpretating nature in terms of design 
and have made a sincere and conscientious study of the princi- 
ples which govern design. 

A home cannot be furnished consistently and harmoniously 
unless every bit of furnishing measures up to the same stand- 



:'■--,. 



■: ■ 



TABLE RUNNER No. 2— CORNELIA A. NEWMAN 



KERAMIQ 'STUDIO 



M 



return of the encouragment and appreciation we bestow. 
For myself I would like to see Keramic Studio open its pages 
to all craft work — for the inspiration and educational value 
it would be to the keramic workers. 

Work Bag 

The material of the bag shown is a heavy black silk. The 
little flower units are embroidered in shades of Blue, Rose, Yel- 
low, Green and Grey. The hoops are Turquoise Green echoing 
the green in the units. It is lined with grey and the cords of 
grey have brilliant green beads pendents. The craftsmanship 
is sincere and the color harmony most satisfying. 

Another bag not shown, also of black silk, had a large 
round medallion on either side showing a bird motif embroid- 
ered on an applied background of royal blue. The color 
scheme combined shades of Orange, Blue Green, darker Green, 
bright Moss Green, Mulberry, Rose and Black. The body of 
the bag is shot with threads of green and blue. The hoops are 
enameled in black with decoration of tiny units in brilliant 
colors echoing those in the design. The lining is Moss Green to 
match that in the decoration and the black cords have brilliant 
large colored beads matching hues in the design. 

Table Runner No. 1 
This runner is of grey linen with applied units in darker 
grey. The embroidery (flower basket design) is in shades of 

(Continued on page 198) 




WORK BAG— CORNELIA A. NEWMAN] 




TILE FOR BOOK END—HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST 



192 



KERAMIC STUDIO 








Motifs for enamels and gold on glass or china — Flora Leland 

GOLD WORK ON GLASS 

D. M. Campana 

AS glass decorations require a much lighter firing than 
china decorations, all materials used in the decoration 
of glass should consequently be softer than materials used 
for china. This applies also to gold. Golds used on glass 
must be prepared somewhat differently. In my many ex- 
periments I found that the addition of more flux to the gold 
used for china for the purpose of melting it quicker does not 
bring a dependable gold. 

Sometimes this gold fires out dull, sometimes more dull 
yet and sometimes it comes out fairly successfully. The 
natural body of the glass has much to do with the results 
and in experimenting I found that a small part of Platinum 
added to the gold and a certain mixed-flux will make the 
gold more adhering to the glass, perhaps a trifle lighter in 
color, but very dependable and clearer than any other gold 
I have used. 

I use my gold pure, mixed with a clean Turpentine and 
nothing else. The mixing of Liquid Bright Gold will make 
it darker and not always so reliable. If you apply this tur- 
pentine-mixed-gold on the outside of a tumbler for instance, 
it will look good and' yellow, not only on the side where the 



gold is applied but also on the inside of the glass. By 
mixing it with Liquid Bright Gold, these very same designs 
would look bright on one side and dark on the other. 

Of course, on such a thing as handles or feet where the 
whole is to be covered, you may apply a Liquid Bright mixed 
with glass Roman gold, also Liquid on the first firing and 
Roman on the second. My choice, however, would always 
be the pure glass Roman gold mixed with the Turpentine, 
because if applied smoothly one coating would be sufficient 
for a good solid effect. I call your attention to the word 
smoothness as gold or colors or any other material applied roughly 
over glass will be seen through the transparency of the glass 
and will make your decorations faulty and bad. 

As to possibilities of gold decoration over glass, I find 
that a touch of gold looks good and for instance on 
drinking glasses, either at the top or at the foot, an etched 
border is good and very effective. The handle of a basket 
or the feet of a bowl covered in gold will look good and pleas- 
ing. One of the most popular decorations on goblets or 
tumblers is the gold monograms which it is not difficult to pro- 
duce and is always very popular with the public. I generally 
apply my monogram on the outside of the glass and have a 
delicate shade of lustre on the inside of the same glass in this 
way making the full decoration in one fire. Good lustre 
colors for this purpose would be Amethyst, Blue Pearl, Rose 
Shell, Golden Amber, Orange or also Iridescent. You can 
draw your monogram with pencil on a piece of paper and 
keep it on the inside part of the glass so that you can follow 
the line when you apply the gold on the opposite side, making 
it very easy to repeat the very same monogram on a quantity 
of glasses. 

As I have mentioned before a good border either etched 
or painted in gold, makes a very pretty decoration and etching 
can be done in the very same manner as on china. You cover 
your glass with the Acid Varnish and dip your glasses in the 
hydro-fluoric acid, only being careful to give about half 
of the time in the acid for the etching of glass as you would 
give to the etching of china. 

Liquid Bright Gold may be used on glass with good re- 
sults though even this article must be a trifle different from 
the one used on china. Roman gold is burnished after the 
fire but I advise you to use Burnishing-Sand instead of Glass 
Brush. Take a piece of rag thoroughly moistened in water, 




MOTIF FOR ENAMELS ON GLASS OR CHINA— LAUREL G. FOSTER 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



193 



dip it in the sand and rub it over the gold until it looks nice 
and clear. Wash the sand off the glass and dry. You will 
find that this method of burnishing will give you a more solid 
and not so streaky effect. 

Resuming on glass gold work I advise you to remember 
the following points: 

1. Have the proper gold, this being the very important 
thing. 

2. Mix your paste gold with pure turpentine only. 

3. Apply gold as smoothly as possible. 

4. Pure Roman gold is more reliable than the gold 
mixed with the Liquid Bright Gold. 

5. Fire your gold at a fair degree of heat. 

6. Burnish with Burnishing Sand rather than ' any- 
thing else. 

Next number: general suggestions for glass decorations. 




THE LINEN PAGE. 



JETTA EHLERS 



Editor 



18 East Kinney Street, Newark, N. J. 



AT first glance the table cover illustrated may seem much 
like work previously shown on this page, but it has one 
very novel feature, which I feel sure will appeal to many work- 
ers. Instead of the usual hem, the piece is finished with a 
binding. This is a very practical manner in which to finish 
things, especially where one wishes to introduce another color. 
This makes a most interesting variation of applique of which 
so much mention has been made in these articles. 

The cover which measures twenty-six and a half by fifty- 
three and a half inches, is made of ecru linen, really a warm 
sand color. Upon this is appliqued a band of blue, and the 
piece is bound with a beautiful dull orange-red. A crocheted edge 
finishes this. The sand colored center measures forty-seven 
and a half by twenty and a half. The band of blue is two inches 
in width, and is sewn to the center section by hand, the raw 
edges on the under side being neatly overcast to prevent any 
ravelling. As can be seen by the illustration the corners are 



not mitred. The binding of dull orange-red is cut straight and 
also sewn on by hand, turning and felling it on wrong side. It 
shows a half inch on both sides, and in cutting it, enough should 
be allowed for a good turn in. A bias binding would of course 
pull and get out of shape when washed. 

The crocheted border is about three quarters of an inch 
wide and is done with a heavy mercerized thread. The first 
row is in double crochet in sand color. Next are three rows in 
single crochet of blue, the first a rather light, then a medium, 
and the last of dark. This has the appearance of a picot at 
intervals. The thread is too heavy for that, but the same 
effect is obtained by making a loop of several chain stitches, 
then skipping a couple of stitches in the previous row and going 
on again. The whole thing is very rich and unusual, in fact, 
it is one of the most interesting pieces which has come to my 
attention in some time. The illustration gives but a faint idea 
of its charm. It so completely meets our requirements that a 
thing should have beauty, distinction and simplicity. It is part 
of a set made by Miss Foley from design by Marshal Fry. Mr. 
Fry is doing much to educate our ceramic workers away from 
old and narrow viewpoints, towards those that are broader and 
more free. There are still those of course who are much like 
the old lady of the story, who, disapproving of modern peda- 
gogies, insisted that her grandchild be taught the alphabet as 
she herself had been, "picked out with a big brass pin." In 
these troublous days when our supply of china is so limited and 
the prices ever soaring, it would seem an opportune time in 
which to plan some table linens. What an interesting and 
profitable study there might be in designing linens to go with 
some of the china we have already decorated. If you have a 
set of Sedji for instance, work out something on the order of 
the piece illustrated. Use grey linen for a foundation perhaps, 
and then study your decoration and see what would be best 
for the applique and for the touch of color on the edge. Try 
several combinations until you feel sure you have one that will 
be right. Applique also suggests itself for sets for the bedroom. 
Perhaps you have a dresser set which you could plan linens for. 
Window curtains for the bed room would be interesting treated 
with a binding of color. It is curious how far one is carried 
along when once started in planning things to go with china. 
And yet it is not so remarkable after all, for the whole field of 
interior decoration is opened to us. 

Many workers are turning to the decoration of glass during 
these days of china shortage. Linen things are quite as suc- 
cessful with glass and many charming things may be worked 
out in this direction. 

A set of glasses for grape juice might have a tray cloth and 
tiny napkins. There is something very attractive about the 
very small napkins, and it is really all one needs with light 
refreshments. A square for the table and the same sort of 
wee napkins could be used with a set of tumblers and capacious 
pitcher for lemonade or iced tea for the porch. There are very 
good shapes to be found in the department stores, some of the 
rather heavy and inexpensive glass firing in a very satisfactory 
way. It is quite fascinating when one gets into it. At any 
rate we must all keep working let it be china, linen or glass, or 
interior decorating. It is most important to keep things going 
so that we may all tide over these trying clays. We at home 
must go on with the usual business of living, so let us put some 
beauty into it as we pass along. 

BOUND COPIES 

Volume 19 of which this (April) number is the last, will 
soon be ready. 

Place your order now ! 



194 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



DECORATED PORCELAINS WINNING FIRST PRIZES AT 
THE MINEOLA FAIR 

Maud M. Mason 

THE group of decorated porcelains receiving first prizes 
at the Long Island Fair at Mineola, illustrated this 
month, gives a very good idea of the benefit to the decorators 
and the value to the public of a demonstration of artistic 
table decoration. All of the articles shown in the photographs 
were designed and decorated by the exhibitors and were most 
satisfying and charming in their effect. 

Mrs. Pearsall's tea-set was fresh and inviting in its soft 
blues and yellows and her design was well adapted to the 
shapes selected. The breakfast set in its soft old rose col- 
oring with black decorations was very delightful in its sim- 
plicity and color combinations. The linens, made to accom- 
pany it, were equally charming, making a most satisfactory 
table. The flowers used in the decorations were pale yellow 
roses shading to a deep pinkish salmon towards the centre, 
completing the unusual scheme. 




FIRST PRIZE VASE— MISS ANNA VAN SICLEN 
Dark Blue and Chinese Rose Enamel on a neutral yellow ground. 



Miss Van Siclen's work showed great variety in its treat- 
ment, the lamp vase being strong in design and having a 
good decorative effect, the decorations being in soft blues 
and rose on a dull yellow background. The enamel tray was 
simple and bold in design and delightful in color. The mono- 
gram plate was especially interesting in its gold decoration 
and shows the use of a monogram as a decorative unit as 
opposed to the usual commercial use of this theme. In the 
lustre tray the same motif used in the enamel tray has been 
adapted to the requirements of a different medium — lustres, 
the design also being very interestingly adapted to the form 
of the oval tray. 

I hope that other State Fairs may have opportunities for 
such a display of artistic table decorations. 



VASE SPIDERWORT MOTIFS 

Mrs. John Ehlers 
>TVEIE outline may be omitted if preferred. Use Black if 
A the outline is used. Oil leaves under the large flower 
at the bottom of vase and the two short ones leading from it. 
Also the two short ones back of upper group and dust with 1 
part Water Green No. 2 and 3 parts Ivory Glaze. Oil re- 
mainder of leaves and dust with Florentine Green. Oil the 
dark petals of flowers and dust with Mode and the light petals 



,t^ 



(%m 



/gfc^- 




with 2 Cameo and 1 Peach Blossom. Leaf in border is Flor- 
entine Green. Dark bands and centers of flowers are Green 
Gold. A gold band may be added at the bottom of vase. 

Second Fire — If the colors need patching or strengthening 
they are to be painted in. Paint the entire background with 
a very thin wash of 2 parts Albert Yellow and 1 part Dark 
Grey. This should be a delicate Ivory tint. Retouch Gold. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



J95 





FIRST PRIZE BREAKFAST SET— MRS. J. N. PEARSALL 
China, Japanese crackle ware in old rose. Decoration in Mason's black 
enamel. 



FIRST PRIZE TEA SET— MRS. T. N. PEARSALL 
Flower forms and bands Dark Blue enamel and Orange, Soft Yellow. 
Leaves Emerald and Florentine Green. Mason's enamels were used. 





SANDWICH TRAY— MISS ANNA VAN SICLEN BON-BON BOX— MISS ANNA VAN SICLEN 

Ground in Rose Lustre. Design in Liquid Bright Silver. Light Brown lustre ground. Design in Copper lustre. 

FIRST PRIZE FOR LUSTRE DECORATIONS 





MONOGRAM PLATE IN GOLD 
FIRST PRIZE FOR MONOGRAM DESIGN 



BELLEEK TRAY— MISS ANNA VAN SICLEN 
Blue, Green, Pink, Yellow, Madder Red enamels — Mason Enamels. 
FIRST PRIZE FOR ENAMEL DECORATION 

DECORATED PORCELAINS WINNING FIRST PRIZES AT THE MINEOLA FAIR 



196 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



SUGAR AND CREAMER 

May E. Reynolds Judson 
THIRST Fire— Outline lilies of the valley with out- 
-*- lining ink that fires in, paint tint in background 
in Yellow Green. Narrow bands in Old Dutch Blue, 
have tint very dainty. Wider bands are in Yellow 
Brown; use very delicately, so that tone will not be 
heavy. Leaves of flowers are in Olive Green and 
Yellow Green, also Apple Green for the light parts, 
and Brown Green for the deeper tones. Centers of 
the lilies are in Yellow Brown and flowers are toned 
with Grey for White Roses. Trenton Ivory is used 
back of the flowers in the oval spaces. Handles and 
bands at top are in Roman Gold. 

Second Fire — Go over the tints if necessary, and 
wash over the flowers and leaves with same tones 
used in first fire. Go over the gold. 

This piece can also be done in enamels, using the 
white enamel for the flowers, and Yellow Brown for 
the centers and Apple Green, Grass Green and Brown 
Green, in the enamels. Use Belleek, if you wish to 
do it in soft enamels. 




CREAMER— MAY E. REYNOLDS JUDSON 




SUGAR— MAY E. REYNOLDS JUDSON 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



197 



BEGINNERS' CORNER 

JESSIE M. BARD ------- Editor 

Dickinson Seminary, Williamsport, Pa. 

CUP AND SAUCER 

Design by Mary L. Brigham 

THE outline may be omitted, but if it is preferred use Black. 
Oil the leaves and stems of flowers with Special Medium 
or Oil and pad it to be sure that it is not on heavy and dust 
with 2 parts Florentine Green and 1 part Ivory Glaze. Oil the 
flowers and dust with 3 parts Cameo and 1 part Peach Blossom. 
Paint the dark spots in the flowers with Peach Blossom and a 
very little Yellow Red. The bands and dots are Green Gold. 
Handle is painted with 3 parts Bright Green and 1 part Dark 
Grey. 

CREAMER 

Georgia B. Spainhower 

OIL the three vertical oblongs in the center of the design 
and the shorter horizontal ones in the border and dust 
with 2 Cameo and 1 Peach Blossom. Clean and straighten 



edges with an orange stick and clean all surplus color from the 
china. Paint the remainder of the design except the wide 




upper band with Green Gold. Paint the wide band with a 
thin wash of Dark Grey and a little Peach Blossom. 

Second Fire — If the pink is too delicate paint a thin wash 
of Peach Blossom over it and retouch Gold. 




CUP AND SAUCER— MARY L. BRIGHAM 



198 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



UNITY OF ART 

(Continued from page 191) 

orange, mulberry, peacock blue, purple, green and black. 
The unit is heavily buttonholed with orange and black. The 
little outside units are in mulberry and blue outlined with 
orange and the edge is heavily buttonholed with orange. The 
little moulds at the corners are of silver with black and pur- 
ple beads pendents. The design is original. The color scheme 
brilliant and daring, but in rare harmony and would act as a 
beautiful setting and for any piece of pottery or porcelains, 
be it lamp, vase or jardinierre. 

Table- Runner No. 2 

This is a most charming piece of color and design. This 
design enamated from the studio of Miss Waldvogal, Pasa- 
dena, one of the leaders in this country in modern art em- 
broidery. The material is of natural colored crash, the 
heavily decorated edge in brown and purple with little units in 
shades of pink, golden brown, soft tans and greens. The 
large units are in shades of rose, yellow, orange, purple and 
greens with dark blue base. The small units scattered over 



the surface are in rose and tans with greens and purple leaves. 
The influence in this design is Russian and Bulgarian but it 
is a purely modern piece of designing and the craftsmanship is 
remarkable. The coloring gives almost the effect of bril- 
liant enamels and the piece would grace any library or drawing 
room table. 

Miss Newman does not confine her talents to articles of 
the types shown but has produced some charming blouses 
o f voile, crepe de Chine and Georgette, exquisitely embroid- 
ered and made and dainty children's frocks, artistic in color 
design and workmanship. 

A blouse recently turned out from this studio was a sand 
colored Georgette crepe — with a charming border design in 
two shades of mul berry and turquoise green with touches of 
orange and emerald green. The design and color harmony of 
the whole was something to gloat over and remember. An- 
other blouse was of grey crepe worked in two shades of coral 
and a darker grey with touches of emerald green. It would 
have done justice to any student of design and color harmony, 
but would have to be seen to be appreciated. 




CHILD'S BREAD AND MILK SET— HILL CARTER LUCAS 

In one color or gold and silver. 



KERAMIC ISTUDIO 



KERAMIC STUDIO 

A MAGAZINE PUBLISHED MONTHLY 
for the 
DESIGNER— POTTER— DECORATOR— FIRER 
AND CRAFTSMAN 



SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

Editor — -Mrs. Adelaide Alsop-Robineau 
Publishers— KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING COMPANY 
Samuel Edouard Robineau, President; George H. Clark, Vice-President and Tre 
Adelaide Alsop-Robineau, Secretary. 

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JEWELERS' ENAMELS 

^OR the decoration of French Ivory, metal, celluloid, glass, 
china, etc. No firing required. Dry in 24 hours. These 
enamels withstand a surprising amount of wear, may be washed 
' in warm soap suds when soiled. Complete set of 11 colors with 
directions for use and a sample hand decorated breast pin for only 
$1.50. For sale only by 
KERAMIC SUPPLY CO., 358 Hume-Mansur Building, INDIANAPOLIS, IND 




u 



WEBER'S SPHINX" 

KERAMIC BURNISH GOLDS 




Highest Quality Roman, Unfluxed, White and Green Golds 
"SPHINX" KERAMIC BRONZES 

"SPHINX" ANTIQUE COPPER BRONZE "SPHINX" GREEN GOLD BRONZE 

"SPHINX" RED GOLD BRONZE "SPHINX" YELLOW GOLD BRONZE 

SPECIAL QUANTITY PRICES ON REQUEST 

jg Special Rates to Schools and Teachers . We solicit your trial order . 

Put up on glass slabs in absolutely Dust Proof Boxes. The CELLULOID COVER IS 
NOT DESTROYED WHEN* TAKEN OFF THEjGOLD, being held firmly by a tin 
cover with four clamps, which when removed, with the clamps bent upwards, serve, 
with lid of box closed, to keep the gold free of dust and air tight until entirely used. 

F. WEBER & CO. Estab. 1854 

REQUISITES FOR THE CHINA PAINTER. 

1125 Chestnut St. PHILADELPHIA, PA 



F* W- Devoe & C L Raynolds Co. 

DISTRIBUTING AGENTS FOR 

HASBURG'S GOLD 



Prepared Ready for Use on Glass Slabs 313 inches 




THE ONLY GOLD 

on the market put up right. COST NO MORE than others and is 
WORTH MORE because iMs better, goes further, works smoother 
is purer, richer, and always uniform. ALL SHADES ALWAYS IN 
STOCK. 



F. W. Devoe & Co.'s Liquid Bright Gold 

Oils and Mediums 

Pencils and Brushes for China Painting 

Agents for Coover's Gold Outline Letters and Designs 



NEW YORK 



CHICAGO 



KANSAS CITY 



CHINA TO DECORATE 

and Artists' Materials. 

Considering the difficulty of securing goods from abroad 
we are remarkably well equipped to meet your needs 
in china and decorating materials. Find out what we 
have on hand. We may be able to supply you with just 
the pieces and colors you have been waiting for. 

Send for Catalog and Price List To-day. 
The A. B. CLOSSON, JR. COMPANY 

FOURTH STREET WEST OF RACE, CINCINNATI, OHIO 



Send for our full list of Books on China Painting. 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 



LIQUID GOLD 35c Vial 



BASKET TRAITS 
Suited to a great 
VARIETY OF USES 

BONBONS SALTED NUTS 
MACAROONS CRACKERS RELISH 




Cake Tray No. 2677-10 in. $1.25 



GEO. W. DAVIS & CO., 
2346 Pleasant Street 



Importers since 1888 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



When writing to advertisers please mention this magazine 



II 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




Overglaze Colors 
in Powder 




Colored Relief 
Enamels 



A comprehensive range of thoroughly reliable Colors and also Colored Relief Enamels, such as 

are used by Miss Mason in her classes. 
Test Tiles showing fired samples of both Hard and Soft Enamels. These are for sale, or will be 

sent on approval, upon payment of postal charges. 
Catalogues with instructions for the use of all materials sent upon request. 

M. M. MASON, 218 West 59th Street, New York City 



/* 



a "%> 




USE NEW METHODS! 



PAINT CHINAor GLASS with WATER COLORS 





ELIMINATE THE INJURIOUS EFFECTS OF TURPENTINE 

VITRO WATER COLORS for GLASS or CHINA 

and 

VITRO WATER GOLD «« CHINA «r GLASS 



BEAUTIFUL YELLOW GOLD 



PUT UP ON GLASS SLABS 



Manufactured only by 



A. SARTORIUS & CO., .*, I 

( 57 MURRAY STREET, NEW YORK | 

m IF YOUR DEALER HAS NOT THESE COLORS, WRITE US FOR CATALOGUE AND INFORMATION 

^ii=h=i i=ir=n=u=n=] ei t=n=i i=ii=] ei j=j [=h=i r=i \=i i=h=h=if=if=h=i[=i i=ir=i [=]r=i[=i[=i[=][=]r=ii=i[=i[=]i=]r=ii=it=]i=ir=n=ii=n=ii=3iy 

Star Self Centering and Dividing Banding Wheel 

THE STANDARD OF VALUE AND QUALITY. 

THE BANDING AND SPACING WHEEL OF THE 
CHINA DECORATORS CHOICE. 

It is probably no exaggeration to say nine out of ten 
Decorators will prefer the Star Banding Wheel to 

any other in the moderate price field. 

The Star is the ideal Banding and Spacing Wheel, mechanically correc t 

of perfect design and construction. 

This is why it makes such an instantaneous appeal to all China Painters. 
WRITE FOR PRICE AND CATALOGUE. 

J. KAEFER MFG. CO., Hamilton, Ohio. 

When writing to advertisers please mention this magazine 




KERAMIC STUDIO 



III 



GLASS DECORATING! 



i 



OPAQUE AND TRANSPARENT GLASS COLORS 



MATT OR SILK FINISH GLASS COLORS 



ENAMELS FOR FLAT AND HIGH RELIEF FOR GLASS 




IRIDESCENT LUSTRES FOR GLASS 



PATENT ROMAN GOLD FOR GLASS 
PATENT SILVER WHITE FOR GLASS 

Guaranteed and tested for all kinds of glass. 



Focht Gas Kiln fires positively uniform 

the most delicate and frailest glass and will reduce breakage 
to a minimum 

specially Prepared for BELLEEK, SATSUMA, ENGLISH, FRENCH and GERMAN CHINA 
For HARD and SOFT GLAZES 

SEND FOR OUR ENCYCLOPAEDIC CATALOGUE 

L. REUSCHE & CO., 12 Barclay St., NEW YORK 

IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS 



Elarco Enamels 



HALL'S 

SUPERIOR GOLDS 

FOR CHINA AND GLASS 
PUT UP IN SEALED BOXES OR IN GLASS JARS 



PLEASE NOTE! 

FIRED TESTS OF HALL'S GOLD 

in comparison with other Ceramic Golds always 

DEMONSTRATES ITS SUPERIORITY 



OUR FAMOUS UNIQUE GOLD 

IS SPECIALLY ADAPTED 

FOR GLASS DECORATION 

AND IS NOW PUT UP BOTH ON GLASS SLABS AND IN PANS 

Single Box 50 cents One dozen $4.75 

SEND FOR OUR CATALOG 



ESTABLISHED 

UPWARDS 




OF 



FORTY YEARS 



FRANKLIN HALL 

1211 West Lehigh Avenue, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

SUCCESSOB TO JAS. F. HALL 

DEALER IN ALL MATERIALS FOR CHINA DECORATION 



SLEEPER'S 




GOLDS 



Look on advertising page IX. 
CLUB RATES WITHDRAWN APRIL 30. 



CHINA PAINTERS 

Be enthusiastic — progressive — on the alert for 

NEW IDEAS ! 

They mean SUCCESS and MORE MONEY for you. We 
are going to keep you posted — you will thank us some day. 

Send ns yonr address now— also your friends'. 

This will place you all on our SPECIAL 
SERVICE MAILING LIST and you will 
receive our new catalogs, circulars, 
studies, designs and announcements of 
new ideas — as we issue them from 
time to time. 

Write today, address "Special Service Department." 

CHINA PAINTERS ! 
Ask about "ART-O-NAMELING" for your Easter work. 

Yours for progress and co-operation 

A. H. ABBOTT & CO. 

Now 19 N. Wabash Ave. CHICAGO. 



When writing to advertisers please mention this magazine 



IV 

r 1 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



t^F 1 r== 1 p= lr=Tr==Tr== i p=ii — i i — i r=ii — i i — ir=n r=ir=i n=nr=i T=ir=nr=ir=n r=nr=i r=iT=ni — n — ir==^ i^=^r=^ r=^i=^r=^r^^ r==^r==^ i=^r==ir=^F==^F==^T=^ i=^r=^P==^r=^ r=^ 

PERFECTION KILNS 



SAFE 



BEST KILNS BUILT 

ECONOMICAL IN OPERATION UNIFORM HEAT 

Fire-brick of Unequaled Quality and Durability 



CLEAN 



EQUIPPED FOR KEROSENE OIL, MANUFACTURED GAS AND NATURAL GAS 



Perfection 

Kilns 

FOR FIRING 

DECORATED CHINA 

and 

GLASSWARE 




Perfection 
Pottery 
Kilns 

FOR FIRING 

POTTERY, TILES, 

TERRA COTTA, 

GLAZES, ETC. 



Perfection Pottery Kiln No. 12, with Oil Burners 

MANUFACTURED BY BELLEVUE INDUSTRIAL FURNACE CO., DETROIT, MICH. 

ADDRESS ALL CORRESPONDENCE TO 

B. F. DRAKENFELD & CO., Inc., SOLE DISTRIBUTORS 

Main Office, 50 Murray Street, New York 



Illustrated Catalogue giving details as to Equipments, Dimensions, Prices, etc , of the various Stock Sizes [jj 

will be mailed on request. m 



ILe 



3f=]r=]r=]r=]r=]| 



iJ 



When writing to advertisers please mention this magazine 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



V 



M.T.WYNNE 

IMPORTER OF WHITE CHINA FOR DECORATING 

52 WEST 36TH STREET 

NEW YORK, N. Y. 



OUR NEW 

ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE 



OF 



ROYAL JAPANESE SATSUMA WARE 

Is Now Ready for Mailing 



Agents for 

Revelation Kilns, Coover's Outlines, 

Hasburg's Gold, Sherratt's Gold 

and Keramic Studio 




HOMEiSTUDIO KILN No. 12 

LIFE-LONG SERVICE 

The [wonderful lasting quality of the "Keramic" 
Kiln is due to the use of tile in their costruction, 
that by government test was pronounced one of the 
highest grades in the world. It is the long-life of 
"Keramic" Kilns combined with easy operation and 
perfect firing qualities, that have made them the 
first, choice of china and glass decorators. 

COLORADO CRUCIBLE & CLAY CO., 

16th and Clay St., Denver, Colo. 



THE OWEN CHINA BANDER 




<JThe Owen China Bander has become a necessary article 
in all up-to-date studios, making accurate banding a 
pleasure instead of a nerve-racking process. 

<I Its simplicity of operation, ease of adjustment and many- 
uses make it an essential device for every China decorator. 
It may be used on plain or scalloped edged, square or 
irregular surfaces and the gold or color will flow with 
uniform width and thickness. 

<J The width of the band may be easily regulated by adjust- 
ing the screw on the side of the pen. 

<I Decorators who are using this simple and inexpensive ban- 
der indorse it as a time and labor saver. 

*I Simple in construction, no working parts to get out of 
order, easily' adjusted, requiring but little practice (by 
amateurs) to accomplish with ease, the same results that 
are only obtained by professionals. 



<J Try the Owen Outlining Pen — it surpasses all others for 
free hand outlining, dotting and semi-conventional decor- 
ating in gold or other colors. 

<I Directions for mixing paint for use in the Owen Outlining 
Pen furnished free on application. 

<I If you are interested in the Owen Bander and Pen send 
for Free Descriptive Catalog. 

P. 0. Box 594 The Oweil Co. Los Angeles, Cal. 



On May 1st we expect to put on the market 
A LINE OF TWENTY OR MORE 

COLORS AND ENAMELS 

for 

GLASS DECORATING. 

These tried Colors are bound to fill a long 
felt want among the Decorators. 



We will also put out a Gold for Glass 

under our 

"KLONDIKE LABEL" 



Send for price list and full information. 
It is bound to interest you. 

W. A. MAURER, Council Bluffs, la. 

MFG. KLONDIKE GOLD— AGT. LIMOGE'S COLORS 
AGT. REVELATION KILNS 



When writing to advertisers please mention this magazine 



VI 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



*m*imiMmrt*m*M*mmmwWffl®ffl 



qpHEFRYARTCO, 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Fry's Celebrated Verifiable Colors 

IN POWDER, AND 

ROMAN GOLD FOR CHINA 



DEALERS IN ALL MATERIAL USED IN 

CHINA DECORATION 



Oil and Water Color Painting 

AGENTS FOR 
HASBURG'S AND MARSCHING'S GOLD 
THE REVELATION CHINA KILN 
THE KERAMIC STUDIO 

Send for Catalogue, mentioning "Keramic Studio" 

35-37 WEST 31ST STREET, NEW YORK 



WHITE CHINA AND MATERIALS 

Large Stock Still On Hand 

The increased cost of goods which arrived last winter and this 
Spring compels me to advance prices on June 1 st. 

PLACE YOUR ORDERS NOW ! 



SUMMER SCHOOL 

JUNE, JULY and AUGUST 

Many interesting lines of work may be taken by the China Painter. 

Tapestry, Oil, Water Coloring Photographs, Lantern Slides, etc., 

all of which are profitable and easy to learn. 

WRITE FOR PARTICULARS. 



Revelation Kilns, Coover Outlines, Designs, 
Hasburg's and Sleeper's Gold. 



Manufacturer of 



Filkins* Burnish Gold 

A 90c Gold for 65c or $7.20 per dozen. 

Buying this Gold from the Manufacturer eliminates all the 
Middlemen's Profits. 



MRS. C. C. FILKINS 

609 Main St., (above Chippewa) BUFFALO, N. Y. 



Smoothest, Richest 
Purest Gold Made 

P\AY after day, year after year, 
^ all the country over, china 
painters are trying other golds to see 
if they are as good as Hasburg's 
Phoenix Gold. They never are! 
Long comparison has confirmed 
the supremacy of Hasburg's. 

If it were only a little better, it could not have 
held its acknowledged prestige. When you 
accept an imitation you are missing a very great 
difference— in smoothness, richness and in 
perfect results. 

AT YOUR DEALERS 
AVOID SUBSTITUTES 

JOHN W. HASBURG COMPANY 

1119 North La Salle Street 

Chicago 




mmmm 



WHITE CHINA FOR DECORATING 

AND 

ARTISTS' MATERIALS 




BURLEY'S FAVORITE 

ROMAN GOLD 

ALL COLORS 



BURLEY'S COLD COLORS 
FOR GLASS 



STEM GLASSWARE 
FOR TABLE USE 



BURLEY & COMPANY 

7 North Wabash Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 




When writing to advertisers please mention this magazine 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



VII 







V'SlHiT Any btitanTi«Tini} Ijtt. 
Ay>a l bed mT,s»>m 




©ad »r smjrynpsi^is isrg<^ ^IfwchBasn^ 
eSni j»f ka% ncpf-r i& a W vfwk og3 fe 

la P" ' i.-'sKib eiens, 

Ajijpptng ikies ^eu Ugp^lffp^sUsytt l$« 



WHY NOT WATER COLOR WORK? 

These mottoes sell for $2.00 each. They cost you in Black hand lettering 
and Grey outline of flowers on art paper readv to color 25c each. Your profit 
for the art work and mat is SI. 75 each. OTHER GOOD MOTTO PAT- 
TERNS 10c each. 

PLACE CARDS 12c DOZEN. SAMPLE OF 50 STYLES FOR 50 CENTS 

Birthday, June Bride and Occasion cards in outline with envelopes to match. 
Many new styles and ideas this month. Some for Graduation and Birth 
congratulations and many of the designs are by Mrs. K. E. Cherry. Sample 
dozen assorted 60c. Other styles of cards and score cards, sachet envelopes 
12c, 24c and 40c dozen. 

NO CATALOG AS YET. Dealers may arrange for sample book. Selection 
on approval to teachers. 

EDWARD F. CHRISTMAN'S BOOK OF DESIGNS 

For those who paint and design in china, water color and oil. Besides 40 pages 
of inspiring new designs the book contains: 

1 A lesson in Tapestry painting. 

2 A lesson in water color painting on the new velvet paper. 

3 Two studies in full color. 

4 Complete instructions for acid etching. 

5 How to do enamel work and four pages of designs. 

6 Alphabet of Gold Letters and Lodge Emblems. 

7 Many clever ideas for water color and other art novelties. 

8 Ten new bird designs for china and water color. A veritable 
artist's scrap book of good practical ideas and all for $1.00. Money 
will be refunded if you are not moie than pleased. 

We have position for two good artists and Al teachers in china 
and water color. 

T. G. COOVER CO., LINCOLN, NEB. 



D. M. CAMPANA ART CO. 



MONOGRAM BOOK 40c 

THE TEACHER OF OIL PAINTING 

BOOK 50c 

THE TEACHER OF WATER COLOR 

PAINTING BOOK 50c 

THE TEACHER OF DRAWING FIG- 

"— URES FROM NATURE 75c 

THE TEACHER OF CONVEN- 

• TIONAL DECORATING BOOK..90c 

LUSTRE BOOK 45c 

FIRING BOOK 30c 

THREE DECORATIVE DESIGN 

Books 1, 2, 3. 535 Orig. Designs. ...$2.10 

THE LEATHER CRAFT BOOK 40c 

FLEXIBLE RULES 18 INCH 30c 

GOLD REMOVER, NON-ACID 25c 

CAMPANA'S KILN MENDING 

MOIST CLAY, PER CAN 30c 

ONE FIRING INK, FIRES BLACK 
Per Bottle 20c 

NOTICE OUR 



Inc. 



OPEN-INE, the new water color medium 
made to keep colors open. Finest thing. 

Per Bottle 25c 

COVERED PALETTE, 8x10 57c 

FINE ROSE STUDY, 9x15 25c 

FINE GRAPE STUDY, 9x15 25c 

LIQUID ERASER, for fired colors. ...45c 
CAMPANA'S DILUTING MEDIUM 

FOR OUTLINING 25c 

OPAL LUSTRE, FINEST 16c 

BEST MOTHER PEARL 20c 

STERLING ROMAN SILVER 

VERY SMOOTH, Per Box 35c 

CAMPANA'S PURITY GOLD 

THIS MONTH, PER BOX 48c 

Campana's catalog contains thousands of 
olher specialties. Colors in vials and bulk. 
Golds in bulk. Moderate price goods abso- 
lutely guaranteed. 



NEW ADDRESS 

323 SOUTH WABASH AVENUE, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



FINAL NOTICE ! 

On account of advance in labor and materials All Club 
Rates and Premium Offers will be withdrawn on April 30th. 
KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO. 



VIRGIN GOLD! Prepared by Walter Herbert Marsh 

FOR CHINA AND BELLEEK 

Adopted by the Leading Art Pottery in U. S. A. 

after 26 years experience with other preparations (using several 

thousand dollars worth of gold yearly) as the 

Best for Purity, Economy and Utility. 

A pleasure to use this Gold. No irritating and discouraging 

glueyness and no essence required, just Turpentine. 

Try it, you will be delighted. $1.00 a Box. 

W. H. MARSH, 
1303 East State Street, Trenton, N. J. 



IDEAL CHINA KILNS 



Patented 1W>4 




Ideal China Kiln Co., 



These Kilns are of such 
simple design and con- 
struction and so easy to 
operate, that 

the novice can 

succeed with them 

and 

they are so 

durable, economical and 
quick in operation 
that they are also the best 
kiln offered for the 

professional china firer. 

Write for catalogue 
and testimonials 

Port Huron, Mich. 



WHITE CHINA 



COMPLETE STOCKS OF 



WHITE CHINA and MATERIALS 
lor CHINA PAINTING 

HAVE YOU TRIED OUR COIN GOLD? 
50 CENTS A ROX 

Wright, Tyndale & van Roden 

INCORPORATED 

1212 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia 



A NEW BOOK "Design and The Decoration of Porcelain" 

By Henrietta Barclay Paist, from her articles Published in "Keramic Studio" 
Paper Cover $1.50 post paid Cloth Cover $2.50 post paid Send card for information and prospectus 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO., SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

When writing to advertisers please mention this magazine 



VIII 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



The Art Institute of Chicago — 

N. H. Carpenter, Secretary and Director, pro tern. 

School of Drawing, Painting, Sculpture, Illustrating, 
Designing, Normal Instruction, 

Ceramic Design and Decoration 

Send for Catalogue Department K, Chicago, 111. 

Miss Jessie M. Bard 

INSTRUCTOR IN 

Design, Jewelry, Leather Work and China Decoration 

The Williamsport-Dickinson Seminary, Williamsport, Pa. 

Blanche Van Court Boudinot 

HOME STUDIO 1316 ALBION AVE., CHICAGO, ILL. 
Special designs in naturalistic, conventional, semi-conventional 
and enamel work, made to your order on china or in water colors. 
STUDIES FOR SALE AND KENT 

SCHNEIDERS CHINA AND LEATHER COLORS 
FOR SALE 

Telephone Rogers Park 61S5 

Mrs. K. E. Cherry 

DESIGNS TO ORDER 



MARINA BUILDING, STUDIO 1, 2. 



ST. LOUIS, MO. 



Jessie Louise Clapp 

TEACHER OF CHINA DECORATION 

IN THE USE OF "COOVER'S OUTLINE DESIGNS" AND 
K. . . CHERRY'S COLORS AND ENAMELS, ETC. 

Sphinx Gold, Roman-Unfluxed, White, Green, 
67 cents per box post-paid. 

516 McCarthy Building, SYRACUSE, N. Y. 
Carrie E. Conley 

Studio: 1164 Downing Street, DENVER, COLO. 

Teacher of Enamels, Conventional and Naturalistic Work 
on Porcelain. Water Color Artist. 

The only "One Grade Enamels" on the market that can be suc- 
cessfully fired on hard and soft china. 
These beautiful colored enamels are prepared r.nd bottled 
in my studio. 
Enamel Medium — Send for information. 

Miss Mabel C. Dibble 

STUDIO— 806 Marshall Field Building 

110 N. Wabash Avenue, Chicago. 

Teacher of Conventional Enamel Work on Porcelain. 

Water color designs for rent. Catalogue, 

Send for price list of ray enamels. Full size vials. 

Prepared and bottled in my studio. 

Enamels Bold as mine at 10c, small vial, are imitations. 

Booklet on Enamel Work 50c. 

Edna Louise Einbigler 

600 WEST 113 STREET, NEW YORK. 

Instructor in China Decoration, Conven- 
tional and Naturalistic, Enamels. 

Telephone Morningside 7686. 

Jetta Ehlers 

STUDIO 18 EAST KINNEY ST., NEWARK, N. J. 

PORCELAIN DECORATION AND DESIGN 

PLANS FOR TABLE LINENS 
Linens and materials for working purchased on commission. 

Miss Gertrude Estabrooks 

Water Color Pictures to Rent — Heads, Flowers, Land- 
scapes and Fruit. Send for Catalogue. 
Book on Methods and Colors, in Water Colors. Price $1. 

Lessons in Water Color, Oil and Tapestry. 
17 N. State St., Stevens Bldg., Room 1505, Chicago, 111. 

Mrs. A. A. Frazee 

STUDIO 919 FINE ARTS BUILDING 

410 Michigan Boulevard, South, Chicago 
Teacher of Conventional Design and Enamel Work on Porcelain 

Send for my Tested, Hard and Satsuma Enamel. 

Original Designs for Conventional Work made to Order. 

Importer of Royal Satsuma for Decorating 



Teachers' Directory 

California 

LOS ANGELES 

Chapman-Bailey Studio, 416-417 Blan- 
chard Building, 233 S. Broadway 

Colorado 

DENVER 

Carrie E. Conley, Studio: 1164 Down- 
ing Street. 

District of Columbia 

WASHINGTON 

Sherratt Art Studio, 608 13th St, N. W. 

Georgia 

ATLANTA 

Miss Jeannette Williams, 375 Piedmont 
Avenue 

Illinois 

CHICAGO 

D. M. Campana Art School, 323-325 S. 
Wabash Ave. 

Miss Mabel C. Dibble, Studio 806 Mar- 
shall Field Building 

Mrs. A. A. Frazee, 918 Fine Arts Bldg., 
410 Michigan Boulevard, So. 

Blanche Van Court Boudinot, 5315 
Kenmore Avenue ti 

Gertrude Estabrooks, 1103 Auditorium 
Tower 

The Art Institute of Chicago, Dept. K. 

Miss Adelaide Liebolt, 1101 Audito- 
rium Tower. 

lone Libby Wheeler, 1020 Fine Arts 
Building, 410 Michigan Boulevard. 

OAK PARK 

Prof. Franz J. Schwarz, 126 So. Ridge- 
land Avenue 

Iowa 

DAVENPORT 

Miss Edith Alma Ross, 312 E. 14th St. 
DES MOINES 

Miss Frances Blanchard, No. 3 Flor- 
entine Building, 7th and Locust St. 

Louisiana 

SHREVEPORT 

Mrs. Anna C. Tarrant, 1165 Louisiana 



ST. I OUIS 

Mrs. K. E. Cherry, Marina Building, 
Grand and Lindell Avenues 

Minnesota 
ST. PAUL 

Henrietta Barclay Paist, 229S Com- 
monwealth Avenue 

New Jersey 

NEWARK 

Mrs. F. N. Waterfield, 149 Washington 

Street 
Miss Charlotte Kroll, 149 Washington 

Street 



Ne 



York 

s, 609 Main Street 



BUFFALO 

Mrs. C. C. Filkii 
NEW YORK 

Edna Louise Einbigler, 600 West 113 

Street 
Mrs. Ada Murray Travis, Florentine 

Court, 160 West 129th St., cor. 7th 

Avenue 
Miss M. M. Mason, 21S West 59th Si. 
Rhoda Holmes Nicholls. 39 W. 07th St. 
Mrs. Carrie L. Gwatkni, 3905 Broadway 
Mrs. L. Vance-Phillips, 13 Central Park 

West 



Lillie M. We 

(cor. 7th Ave.) 

SYRACUSE 

Miss Jessie Louisi 
Block, corner Soi 
daga Streets. 

Ohio 

COLUMBUS 

Miss Mint M. Hood, 



159 W. 125th St., 



1092 E. Rich St. 



Pennsylvania 
PHILADELPHIA 

A. B. Cobden 13 South 10th St. 
H. Foerster, 1554 North 13th Street. 

Tennessee 
CHATTANOOGA 

Mrs. B. B. Crandall, 220 E. Terrace 



MILWAUKEE 
Anna E. Pierce 
194 11th St. 



and Adcle P. Oha: 



H. Foerster 

1554 North 13 St., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Selling my product of ACIDING CHINA WITHOUT 

DIPPING, ready for use, with direction, whereby it is 

not necessary to cover backs and insides with resist at 

$10.00 for first order. 

Further orders, a 2 oz. bottle will cost $1.50 only. 

Mrs. F. N. Waterfield 
Miss Charlotte Kroll 

DOMESTIC ART ROOMS, 149 Washington St., Newark, N. i. 

Importers and Dealers in China for Decorating 

PAINTS, MEDIUMS, ETC. CHINA FIRED DAILY 

Agents for Perfection Kilns 

Send for our "Rose," stands repeated firings. 25c per vial 

Miss Adelaide Liebolt 

1101 Auditorium Tower, Chicago, 111. 

Teacher of Conventional Design on China. 

Designs for rent for enamel work. 

Formula for enamel work given by ma i 1 . 
Work started or finished for out of town students. 

Miss M. M. Mason 

218 West 59th St., New York 

THE PRINCIPLES OF DESIGN— with studio work 
for teachers, craftsmen and designers. 

CERAMICS — the use of colors, enamels, and lustres, 
— modeling in clay — the building of pottery 
forms. 
Catalogue of designs upon request 

Rhoda Holmes Nicholls 

CLASSES IN WATER COLORS AND OILS 



Colonial Studios, 39 W. 67th St., New York City 
Henrietta Barclay Paist 

A Non-resident Course of Design for the China Decorator. 

Simple and practical. 

This course was the outcome of a demand for help in this direction 

and has been in practice since 1910. 

The advantages are obvious. You can put yourself 

in the Creative Class. Write for particulars. 

Special arrangements for Clubs or groups of four or more. 

2298 Commonwealth Avenue, ST. PAUL, MINN. 

Emily F. Peacock 

104 South Street, Freehold, N. J. 

DEALER IN UNUSUAL ANTIQUES 



Miss Edith Alma Ross 

New Studies in Water Color for Rent 

New designs for china decoration, naturalistic and conventional 

New water color studies for landscape and flower painting. 

New designs for china arranged in sets. 

Studies sent on approval upon receipt of reference. 

For price-list Address 312 E. Fourteenth St., Davenport, Iowa. 

Special designs made to order. 

THIS SPACE together with name and address 
in "The Directory" $3.00 Per Month 

A YEAR'S CONTRACT CARRIES WITH IT A YEAR'S 

SUBSCRIPTION TO THIS MAGAZINE. 

Send for yearly contract rates 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 

J. Blair Suffolk 

Classes in the modern decoration of porcelain and glass. 

The Old Persian method of decorating porcelain over the glaze. 

Enamels, Colors, Lustres, Metals, Water Color, 
Japanese Wood Blocks. 

9 West 64h St., New York 93 Rue de Vaugirard. Paris 



Mrs. Anna C. Tarrant 

1165 Louisiana Avenue, SHREVEPORT, LA. 

TEACHER OF CHINA DECORATION 

OUT OF TOWN STUDENTS, 

write for terms and particulars, 

CHINA FLRED DAILY. MATERIALS. 



When writing to advertisers please mention this magazine 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



IX 



Mrs. Ada Murray Travis j^ p £ 7 ning8ide 

Studio FlorenHn* Court 166 West lZ9lh St., New York City 

TO OUT OF TOWN TEACHERS 
I have one of the largest collections of New and Original 
Designs for Enamel in Water Colors either for sale or rent. 

Designs sent an approval. 
Also have large assortment of Conventional and Naturalistic. 

LilHe M. Weaver Telephone 58S5 Morningside 

CLASSES IN CHINA DECORATION 
Conventional, Naturalistic, Enamels, Lusters. 

OIL PAINTING 

Landscape. Still Life. 

Studio 159 W. 125th Street, (corner 7th Avenue) 

NEW YORK CITY. 

Expert Firing Daily. Especial Attention to Enamesl 

St. Louis School of Fine Arts 

WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY 

POTTERY, CERAMIC DECORATION 

AND INSTRUCTION IN ALL BRANCHES OF THE ARTS 
LINDELL BOULEVARD AND SKINKER ROAD 

For Full Information and Free Illustrated Catalogue 
Apply to E. H. WUERPEL, DIRECTOR 

Inquiries and orders from all parts of the world 
are coming for the new book 

"Design and the Decoration of Porcelain." 

By HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST. 

recently published by this Company 1 

Paper Cover $1.50 Cloth Cover $2.50 

POST-PAID. 

Teachers and students of design seeking after original ideas! 

This book will interest you. Send for Prospectus ! 

The above with paper binding mailed with one year' s 

subscription to Keramic Studio for $5.00 
KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO.. SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



TEACHERS! 

Club Rates for United States 
only 

Until April 30th. 

Club of Ten Members 
For $35.00 

Your pramium, a year'* subscription and 
one of our Class Room Book*, worth $7.00. 

Club of Five Members 
for $18.25 

Earn your own subscription for one 
year by sending us Fire Yearly Subscrip- 
tions at the club price, $3.65 each. 

Work for us and yourselves! 

WANTED ! 

Copies of Palette and Bench 

for October, 1909. 

Quote price. — Address: 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO. 
201 Gifford Street 

Syracuse, N. Y. 



SUMMER TERM 



University of Pittsburgh 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



W. G. CHAMBERS 

Dean of School of Education 



H. R. KNIFFIN 
Prof. Fine and Industrial 



Specialization in the Fine Arts, Industrial 

Arts and Crafts 
Standard Courses in all Other Departments 

Bulletin on Application to Registrar 

THE BOOK OF CUPS AND SAUCERS 

Price $1.50 

will be mailed to any regular active subscriber 
for $1.00 postpaid. 

The combination price for this book and subscrip- 
tion is $5.00 ! 

LITTLE THINGS TO MAKE 

Price $2.50 

will be mailed to any regular active subscriber 
for $1.75 postpaid. 

The combination price for this book and subscrip- 
tion is $5.75 ! 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO., 

Syracuse, N. Y. 

A NEW BOOK 

In Preparation. 

Modern Lustres — By lone Libby Wheeler 

1029 FINE ARTS BLDG., 410 Michigan Boulevard, Chicago, 111. 

Price SI. 00 post-paid 

Instructions in Lustre and Conventional Decoration 

by appointment. 



A. B. Gobden's Ceramic Art School 

COBDEN'S SPECIAL CERAMIC COLORS in Powder 

COBDEN'S PURE ROMAN GOLD First Quality Only 
MEDIUMS, BRUSHES AND ALL MATERIALS FOR CHINA DECORATING 

FULL STOCK COOVER LINES 

A Beautiful Reproduction of a Cobdetl Rose Study 

By Mail 75c. 

13 South Sixteenth Street PHILADELPHIA, PA 

Special Agent for Keramic Studio Publications 



WHITE CHINA FOR DECORATING 

Open Stock Dinner Sets, Haviland & Co. Derby, Plain, Ranson and 
Star Shapes. 

J. P. FRENCH CHINA DINNER SETS 

Ideal and Flora Shapes. 

No Catalogue 

Prices net ! No discount ! 

Write us your wants, large selection French and German China. 

JOHN G. YERGAN, - - PITTSBURGH, PA. 

424 Penn Avenue, Opposite Hotel Lincoln. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

SHERRATT'S ROMAN GOLD 

ROMAN, UNFLUX, GREEN and RED GOLD, $1.00 per box. SILVER 
50 cents per box. Dealers and Teachers rates on application. This Gold is 
Superior in Quality and Quantity. Once used always used. Hand Painted China 
a Specialty. Lessons in China Painting. White China for Decorating and 
household use. All kinds of China Art Materials. Oiders promptly filled. 
AGENT FOR REVELATION CHINA KILNS. 

SHERRATT'S CHINA ART STORE 

608 13TH STREET. N. W.. WASHINGTON. P. C. 



COOLEY'S GOLDS! 

NONE BETTER! 

FINEST OILS, COLORS AND LUSTRES. 

Whatever you need for Decorating we have it. 
BOSTON CHINA DECORATING WORKS, 

ESTABLISHED 1860 

38 Tennyson Street, BOSTON, MASS. 



Copy for advertisements for Jane number should be in by 

MAY 1st. 

Keramic Studio Publishing Co. 



HIGGINS' 



DRAWING INKS 
ETERNAL WRITING INK 
ENGROSSING INK 
ITAURINE MUCILAGE 
PHOTO MOUNTER 
DRAWING BOARD PASTE 
LIQUID PASTE 
OFFICE PASTE 
VEGETABLE GLUE 
Are the Finest and Best InKs and Adhesives. 
Emancipate yourself from the use of corrosive and ill-smelling inks and 
adhesives, and adopt the Higgins Inks and Adhesives. They will be a 
revelation to you, they are so sweet, clean, well put up, withal so efficient. 
At Dealers Generally 

Chas. HI. Biggins & Co., Mfrs., 271 Ninth Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 




Bozeman, Mont., April 3, 1917 
We have a copy of Keramic Studio for August, 1912, which 
we will sell for $1.00. 

Elizabeth T. Stone, Librarian. 
Montana State College Library. 



When writing to advertisers please mention this magazine 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



THE REVELATION KILNS 



H. J. CAULKINS 




Especially well adapted for Glass Firing »• c. perry 

** // china decorators would do their own firing with a 
Revelation Kiln, then figure what they had saved, the 
results would be another revelation. 



The most perfect device for public or private 
studio use, as good chimney connection is all that 
is required for perfect operation. The fuel, kerosene 
oil, is easily obtained in all places. 





Being of tubular construction, so 
that a series of little firebrick flues form 
the wall of the oven, there is no chance 
for warping and going out of shape, as 
in the case of a flat brick wall. 




No plumbing, no gas 
bills, no flying back in the 
mixer, no escaping of un- 
healthful or disagreeable 
fumes into the room. 



This is our new No. 3 round kiln. 

The removable tubes by the door constitute 
the essential advantage of this kiln, as they make 
a complete circle of flame about the oven. They 
may be used or not, at the will of the firer, but 
are especially desirable when an even, strong heat 
is necessary for certain classes of work. 

Our Pottery Kilns are built on 
the same plan, with heavier construc- 
tion and Crane Hinge Doors. We 
have a small combination kiln for 
studio and craft work as well as 
school work, which cannot be surpassed 
We also make larger kilns, 
which will fire to any heat 
required for developing 
clay bodies or porcelain 
glazes. For the first time 
in the history of ceramics 
these kilns have made it 

possible for 
the ama- 
teur to de- 
velop the 
highest 
grade of 
profession - 
al pottery. 




The radiation of 
heat into the interior 
is almost without loss, 
since the fire-brick 
forming the tubes is 
very tj thin. On the other hand, the 
fire-brick and heavy non-conduct- 
ing wall on the outside prevents 
the radiation of heat into the room 
so that the kiln can be fired with 
comfort. 

No. 6 (see below) — This is the most popular 

size for general studio use. No. 7 is for profes- 
sional These kilns may be 
an( ^ - * 1 arranged with a series 
factory g, of shelves to accommo- 
firing. I i\ date flat glass. 








We also construct to order 
all sizes and shapes of kilns 
for all purposes requiring heat 
in manufacturing, for melt- 
ing, enameling, fusing, test- 
ing, etc., both in the open 
flame and closed oven. 



W- 



Send for one of our catalogues containing 
testimonials of the foremost decorators in 
this and other countries who make exclusive 
use of Revelation Kilns. 

If you want to know about the Reve- 
lation Kiln ASK THOSE WHO USE THEM 




H. J. CAULKINS & CO. 

Manufacturers of China Kilns, Pottery Kilns, Enamel Furnaces, Dental, and other high heat furnaces 
Smith Building, State and Griswold Streets, DETROIT, MICH. 




OUR ADVICE 1 

TO 

SUBSCRIBERS 

Take full advantage 

of these 
cut prices given to 

YOU 

as a supporter of 

Keramic Studio 




50 per cent Discount on the Following: 

I^ TO SUBSCRIBERS ONLY I ~*| 

Regular Price. 

Class Room No. 1. Art of Teaching, etc., $3.00 

" No. 2. Flower Painting, etc., 3.00 

" No. 3. Figure Painting, etc., 3.00 

" No. 4. Conventional Decoration, etc. 3.00 

Little Things to Make, ™C b e ° d to^ s gStf? &S 2.00 

Book of Cups and Saucers, 1 .30 

SPECIAL NOTICE — We cannot deliver these books post paid at cat prices, therefore add IS cents (or each book ordered 

THIS IS AN OPPORTUNITY 



l Y. 



Either New or Renewal. 
KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO., SYRACUSE, 



To Subscribers Only ! 

Ask about "Removal Sale'' on back numbers to subscribers only. List mailed on appli- 
cation. Good opportunity to fill vacant spots in past volumes, at a nominal price. 



New address: 53 J South Clinton Street, 



KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO., 

SYRACUSE, N* Y. 



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